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Permali Blades for British Aerospace Wind Tunnel

Permali Blades for British Aerospace Wind Tunnel Permali Blades for British Aerospace Wind Tunnel PERMALI Gloucester Ltd. has recently supplied laminated fan blades for the wind tunnel used to test one of British Aerospace's most advanced projects, the Horizontal Take-Off and Landing space vehicle (HOTOL). This is the fourth set of fan blades Permali has supplied to the 5.5 metre wind tunnel at Warton Aerodrome, which has been used extensively for HOTOL testing since development began four years ago. The blades are testing has caused the HOTOL prototype made from Brazilian mahogany, edge- to be modified considerably. The initial bonded into laminations, which are design included foreplanes and rear fins, then built up into a blade block using which have now been discarded as the blades offer high structural integrity, Resorcinol glue. The block is rough- wind tunnel tests and other analyses resistance to operating stresses, freedom machined to its aerodynamic shape, showed that the required aerodynamic from fatigue and corrosion-resistance. hand-finished to a final tolerance of stability and control could be achieved Permali blades have an excellent strength 0.02" and then coated with an epoxy without them. to weight ration and are lighter than resin and glass system. Permali has built fan blades for a those made from other materials. variety of end-users, including NASA, All manufacturing stages are closely monitored and inspection procedures the National Physical Laboratory, Ford Permali Gloucester Ltd, 125 Bristol and General Motors. Their lamianted are complemented by laboratory testing Road, Gloucester. GL1 5TT. to ensure the assembled fan is correctly balanced when operating. The course starts with a review of linear HOTOL is a re-usable launch vehicle systems, investigates the limitations of designed to place a payload of up to 8 linear techniques when applied to non­ Short Courses linear systems and finally looks at the tonnes in low earth orbit, cheaply and tools available for a detailed study of safely. Although designed for entirely non-linear systems. automatic control, HOTOL can be fitted with a manned capsule for The second course, "An Introduction particular tasks. The vehicle has an THE Continuing Education Unit (CEU) to Signal Processing Techniques" 18th- entirely new propulsion technique which 20th June is aimed at the many in the Department of Engineering, enables it to go into orbit in one single engineers involved in dynamic testing University of Manchester was established stage. 18 months ago to provide a wide range and the analysis/interpretation of real of advanced and continuing education test data. The emphasis of the course is HOTOL achieves its take-off speed courses for industry. There is now a on understanding basic concepts and of 280 knots after 7,500 feet on the their application to real situations. To programme of 23 courses for the present ground, goes supersonic within one and achieve this the course consists of a half minutes, reaching Mach 5 in an academic year. A number of these courses are in the field of dynamic structured lectures and hands-on exper­ accelerating climb after eight minutes. testing and signal processing. ience using the extensive computer and At 90km above the earth, Hotol has laboratory facilities available within the gained sufficient speed to go into orbit. Two such courses are being offered in Department. The latest PC based signal The main engine then cuts off and the June. The first of these, "Vibration pocessing systems will also be introduced vehicle coasts to its operating altitude of Testing and the Analysis of Linear and used in the laboratory exercises. This 300km. Non-Linear Structures" 11th-13th June, course will also be of interest to all is concerned with the identification and Missions are expected to last an engineers and scientists who are involved modelling of the dynamic behaviour of average of 50 hours, at the end of which in random signal analysis. linear and non-linear structures. This is time the vehicle is automatically slowed a relatively new area and as such there down and brought to 70km for re-entry. are very few established tools and The 5.5 metre tunnel is one of four Contact: Continuing Education Unit, techniques for practising engineers to Department of Engineering, University tunnels of different specifications at refer to for guidance when first con­ of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester Warton. It is a low speed tunnel, where fronted with either testing or analysing air is drawn over scale models at 21 M13 9PL. Telephone: 061 275 4398/ the non-linear behaviour of structures. metres/second (45 mph). Wind tunnel 4372. Fax: 061 275 3844. AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING —Apri l 1991 19 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Permali Blades for British Aerospace Wind Tunnel

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 63 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb037086
Publisher site
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Abstract

Permali Blades for British Aerospace Wind Tunnel PERMALI Gloucester Ltd. has recently supplied laminated fan blades for the wind tunnel used to test one of British Aerospace's most advanced projects, the Horizontal Take-Off and Landing space vehicle (HOTOL). This is the fourth set of fan blades Permali has supplied to the 5.5 metre wind tunnel at Warton Aerodrome, which has been used extensively for HOTOL testing since development began four years ago. The blades are testing has caused the HOTOL prototype made from Brazilian mahogany, edge- to be modified considerably. The initial bonded into laminations, which are design included foreplanes and rear fins, then built up into a blade block using which have now been discarded as the blades offer high structural integrity, Resorcinol glue. The block is rough- wind tunnel tests and other analyses resistance to operating stresses, freedom machined to its aerodynamic shape, showed that the required aerodynamic from fatigue and corrosion-resistance. hand-finished to a final tolerance of stability and control could be achieved Permali blades have an excellent strength 0.02" and then coated with an epoxy without them. to weight ration and are lighter than resin and glass system. Permali has built fan blades for a those made from other materials. variety of end-users, including NASA, All manufacturing stages are closely monitored and inspection procedures the National Physical Laboratory, Ford Permali Gloucester Ltd, 125 Bristol and General Motors. Their lamianted are complemented by laboratory testing Road, Gloucester. GL1 5TT. to ensure the assembled fan is correctly balanced when operating. The course starts with a review of linear HOTOL is a re-usable launch vehicle systems, investigates the limitations of designed to place a payload of up to 8 linear techniques when applied to non­ Short Courses linear systems and finally looks at the tonnes in low earth orbit, cheaply and tools available for a detailed study of safely. Although designed for entirely non-linear systems. automatic control, HOTOL can be fitted with a manned capsule for The second course, "An Introduction particular tasks. The vehicle has an THE Continuing Education Unit (CEU) to Signal Processing Techniques" 18th- entirely new propulsion technique which 20th June is aimed at the many in the Department of Engineering, enables it to go into orbit in one single engineers involved in dynamic testing University of Manchester was established stage. 18 months ago to provide a wide range and the analysis/interpretation of real of advanced and continuing education test data. The emphasis of the course is HOTOL achieves its take-off speed courses for industry. There is now a on understanding basic concepts and of 280 knots after 7,500 feet on the their application to real situations. To programme of 23 courses for the present ground, goes supersonic within one and achieve this the course consists of a half minutes, reaching Mach 5 in an academic year. A number of these courses are in the field of dynamic structured lectures and hands-on exper­ accelerating climb after eight minutes. testing and signal processing. ience using the extensive computer and At 90km above the earth, Hotol has laboratory facilities available within the gained sufficient speed to go into orbit. Two such courses are being offered in Department. The latest PC based signal The main engine then cuts off and the June. The first of these, "Vibration pocessing systems will also be introduced vehicle coasts to its operating altitude of Testing and the Analysis of Linear and used in the laboratory exercises. This 300km. Non-Linear Structures" 11th-13th June, course will also be of interest to all is concerned with the identification and Missions are expected to last an engineers and scientists who are involved modelling of the dynamic behaviour of average of 50 hours, at the end of which in random signal analysis. linear and non-linear structures. This is time the vehicle is automatically slowed a relatively new area and as such there down and brought to 70km for re-entry. are very few established tools and The 5.5 metre tunnel is one of four Contact: Continuing Education Unit, techniques for practising engineers to Department of Engineering, University tunnels of different specifications at refer to for guidance when first con­ of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester Warton. It is a low speed tunnel, where fronted with either testing or analysing air is drawn over scale models at 21 M13 9PL. Telephone: 061 275 4398/ the non-linear behaviour of structures. metres/second (45 mph). Wind tunnel 4372. Fax: 061 275 3844. AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING —Apri l 1991 19

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1991

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