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Paediatric tonsillectomy Impact assessment using a validated patient reported outcome measure (PROM)

Paediatric tonsillectomy Impact assessment using a validated patient reported outcome measure (PROM) Purpose – The published evidence in support of a tonsillectomy is equivocal relying on historical studies using objective outcome measures. Based on this, NICE have suggested that tonsillectomy is a “low clinical value treatment” and its funding curtailed by PCTs. This paper aims to prospectively evaluate the effect of a tonsillectomy on quality of life (QOL) of children affected by recurrent infective tonsillitis using a qualitative patient reported outcome measure (PROM). Design/methodology/approach – Parents of children under the age of 16, undergoing a tonsillectomy, were enrolled. Parents completed a paediatric throat disorders outcome (PTDO) test prior to their child's surgery and then six months post‐operatively. Results were analysed using the Mann‐Whitney U test. The power of the study was 0.8 to detect a difference of 10 in a total score of 70. Findings – A total of 63 children participated and an 86 per cent response rate was received at six months. The mean total score improved from 31.29 pre‐op to 7.41 post‐op ( p <0.001). The mean score for the first two subgroups remained static but for the remaining 12 sub‐groups significantly improved post‐op. Originality/value – The study demonstrates that performing tonsillectomies in a carefully selected cohort of children, significantly improves their QOL. It adds to a growing body of evidence that tonsillectomy is not a “low clinical value procedure” and has a substantial impact on the patients' symptoms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Governance: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Paediatric tonsillectomy Impact assessment using a validated patient reported outcome measure (PROM)

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-7274
DOI
10.1108/14777271311317918
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The published evidence in support of a tonsillectomy is equivocal relying on historical studies using objective outcome measures. Based on this, NICE have suggested that tonsillectomy is a “low clinical value treatment” and its funding curtailed by PCTs. This paper aims to prospectively evaluate the effect of a tonsillectomy on quality of life (QOL) of children affected by recurrent infective tonsillitis using a qualitative patient reported outcome measure (PROM). Design/methodology/approach – Parents of children under the age of 16, undergoing a tonsillectomy, were enrolled. Parents completed a paediatric throat disorders outcome (PTDO) test prior to their child's surgery and then six months post‐operatively. Results were analysed using the Mann‐Whitney U test. The power of the study was 0.8 to detect a difference of 10 in a total score of 70. Findings – A total of 63 children participated and an 86 per cent response rate was received at six months. The mean total score improved from 31.29 pre‐op to 7.41 post‐op ( p <0.001). The mean score for the first two subgroups remained static but for the remaining 12 sub‐groups significantly improved post‐op. Originality/value – The study demonstrates that performing tonsillectomies in a carefully selected cohort of children, significantly improves their QOL. It adds to a growing body of evidence that tonsillectomy is not a “low clinical value procedure” and has a substantial impact on the patients' symptoms.

Journal

Clinical Governance: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 19, 2013

Keywords: Tonsillectomy; Patient reported outcome measures; Tonsillitis; Quality of life; Children (age groups); Surgery

References