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Our Letter Bag Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 218 APRIL 1947 realities of the matter and raising the peaks of essential truth higher above the mists. HERE can be few instances of a monthly magazine running a There the matter can safely be allowed to rest, the whole cor­ serial, however popular, over twenty-two issues. Even the respondence having provided designers with a firm foundation on Tearlier stories of Charles Dickens, long though they are by • which to base their calculations when considering the underlying comparison with many modern novels, can hardly have taken so principles of the three methods for future surveys. long as nearly two years to reach their finale in the pages of 'House­ hold Words' nor did, we suppose, an eager public avidly devour American Testimony 'The Yellowplush Papers' over so long a period. When we received MR. CLEAVER'S letter which appears in this issue we looked back On another page we print a welcome letter from MR. BROADSTON through the files of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING to refresh our memory as of NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION testifying to the practical use of to when his original article appeared. In the end it was not a case of analytical geometry as an aid to the laying out of aeroplanes and recalling to mind a well-remembered fact so much as of making a avoidance of the somewhat cumbersome method of the loft. He, too, fresh incursion into history. For to our astonishment we discovered appears to have been burrowing in the files of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, that it did not appear, as we had thought, during 1946 but dated unearthing the issue of June, 1946 and being impelled by what he back to so long ago as June, 1945. Like the best cheese or, to adopt a found there to write to us. We have appended to his letter a list of more pleasing simile, a vintage wine, it was some time in coming to articles dealing with this method which have appeared from time to maturity. Indeed the comparison with a feuilleton breaks down on time in these columns so that those who are not familiar with it can closer examination because there was a gap of three months before look up and study the examples we have provided. the next instalment appeared, in September, 1945, in the form of a It is always gratifying for an editor to receive confirmation from letter from MR. MALLINSON and it was not in fact until January of the responsible quarters of the views he has expressed, and the excellence following year that the subject was reviewed by a further contribution of the aeroplanes produced by this American firm are sufficient —this time from Holland—pointing out a slight mistake made by guarantee of the quality of the support emanating from such a source. MR. MALLINSON; his frank acknowledgment of which we published For this reason, we are peculiarly pleased to have his tribute to the two months later. After another lull, there appeared in September technical standard and usefulness of the editorial material we place a letter from M. JAUMOTTE of the University of Brussels questioning before our readers. the basis of the structure on which MR. CLEAVER'S theories, as on the whole confirmed by MR. MALLINSON, had been built up. This A Hint to Advertisers produced firmly worded protests from both these gentlemen, sup­ By the same post we received another letter from the United States ported from a fresh quarter by a letter from one whose name was which raises a point which we feel should be brought to the notice of already well-known as a contributor, MR. KRZYWOBLOCKI, a Pole those who advertise in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. This contains a com­ who had found sanctuary in the University of Illinois. Owing to the plaint that some of our advertisers fail to give the detailed informa­ exigencies of space we were unable to make room for these con­ tion about their products for which readers of this paper look. It is tributions till December, when between them they filled two pages. emphasized that the advertisements we print are read by engineers, There we thought the matter would rest but there was still one more for whom a general laudatory announcement of the excellence of the letter to come, this time from M. EESTERMANS of Paris; adding still articles or materials referred to is not enough. If an engineering another to the number of nations that have interested themselves in reader is to be invited to try something with which he is unfamiliar— the controversy. be it tool or material—what he likes to be given is the precise details —such as, for instance, chemical composition and test results of a metal—in order that he may be able to judge whether or not it is Closing the Correspondence likely to be suitable for the particular purpose he has in mind. British firms advertising in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should realize Though, as he says, the story would seem to be capable of being that they are not only bringing their wares to the notice of British continued 'in our next' indefinitely we feel that the time has really engineers but that their announcements will be read by aircraft come to call a halt to the controversy; leaving the last word, as the engineers all over the world. The name of a firm or a product that is a first, with MR. CLEAVER. The net result of all the ink that has flowed 'household word' in this country may be quite unknown to an through the ebbing and flowing of the tide of battle is to leave his engineer in, for example, the United States and he may not take the , head erect. Such serious criticism as there has been of his conception trouble to write to this country for the full details which are omitted of the relative propulsive efficiencies of the propeller, jet and rocket from the advertisement. In the particular instance of the correspon­ has been mainly directed at minor details of expression and his main dent to whom we are referring he did bestir himself and write to us theories of the true bases of comparison have remained unchallenged. specifically to call our attention to this defect, but others who might In view of the abstruse character of the problem, and the somewhat be interested will not be so minded and thus an opportunity of inchoate nature of the knowledge of it at the time when his article spreading the gospel of British engineering genius will be lost. We was written, we feel that he is much to be congratulated on this out­ cannot do more than pass on the criticism, as we have received it, to come and, as we wrote at the time, to be commended for the good those concerned. Verbum sapientibus satis est. service he has done in dispelling the clouds that were obscuring the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Our Letter Bag

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 19 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1947

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031492
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XIX No 218 APRIL 1947 realities of the matter and raising the peaks of essential truth higher above the mists. HERE can be few instances of a monthly magazine running a There the matter can safely be allowed to rest, the whole cor­ serial, however popular, over twenty-two issues. Even the respondence having provided designers with a firm foundation on Tearlier stories of Charles Dickens, long though they are by • which to base their calculations when considering the underlying comparison with many modern novels, can hardly have taken so principles of the three methods for future surveys. long as nearly two years to reach their finale in the pages of 'House­ hold Words' nor did, we suppose, an eager public avidly devour American Testimony 'The Yellowplush Papers' over so long a period. When we received MR. CLEAVER'S letter which appears in this issue we looked back On another page we print a welcome letter from MR. BROADSTON through the files of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING to refresh our memory as of NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION testifying to the practical use of to when his original article appeared. In the end it was not a case of analytical geometry as an aid to the laying out of aeroplanes and recalling to mind a well-remembered fact so much as of making a avoidance of the somewhat cumbersome method of the loft. He, too, fresh incursion into history. For to our astonishment we discovered appears to have been burrowing in the files of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, that it did not appear, as we had thought, during 1946 but dated unearthing the issue of June, 1946 and being impelled by what he back to so long ago as June, 1945. Like the best cheese or, to adopt a found there to write to us. We have appended to his letter a list of more pleasing simile, a vintage wine, it was some time in coming to articles dealing with this method which have appeared from time to maturity. Indeed the comparison with a feuilleton breaks down on time in these columns so that those who are not familiar with it can closer examination because there was a gap of three months before look up and study the examples we have provided. the next instalment appeared, in September, 1945, in the form of a It is always gratifying for an editor to receive confirmation from letter from MR. MALLINSON and it was not in fact until January of the responsible quarters of the views he has expressed, and the excellence following year that the subject was reviewed by a further contribution of the aeroplanes produced by this American firm are sufficient —this time from Holland—pointing out a slight mistake made by guarantee of the quality of the support emanating from such a source. MR. MALLINSON; his frank acknowledgment of which we published For this reason, we are peculiarly pleased to have his tribute to the two months later. After another lull, there appeared in September technical standard and usefulness of the editorial material we place a letter from M. JAUMOTTE of the University of Brussels questioning before our readers. the basis of the structure on which MR. CLEAVER'S theories, as on the whole confirmed by MR. MALLINSON, had been built up. This A Hint to Advertisers produced firmly worded protests from both these gentlemen, sup­ By the same post we received another letter from the United States ported from a fresh quarter by a letter from one whose name was which raises a point which we feel should be brought to the notice of already well-known as a contributor, MR. KRZYWOBLOCKI, a Pole those who advertise in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. This contains a com­ who had found sanctuary in the University of Illinois. Owing to the plaint that some of our advertisers fail to give the detailed informa­ exigencies of space we were unable to make room for these con­ tion about their products for which readers of this paper look. It is tributions till December, when between them they filled two pages. emphasized that the advertisements we print are read by engineers, There we thought the matter would rest but there was still one more for whom a general laudatory announcement of the excellence of the letter to come, this time from M. EESTERMANS of Paris; adding still articles or materials referred to is not enough. If an engineering another to the number of nations that have interested themselves in reader is to be invited to try something with which he is unfamiliar— the controversy. be it tool or material—what he likes to be given is the precise details —such as, for instance, chemical composition and test results of a metal—in order that he may be able to judge whether or not it is Closing the Correspondence likely to be suitable for the particular purpose he has in mind. British firms advertising in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING should realize Though, as he says, the story would seem to be capable of being that they are not only bringing their wares to the notice of British continued 'in our next' indefinitely we feel that the time has really engineers but that their announcements will be read by aircraft come to call a halt to the controversy; leaving the last word, as the engineers all over the world. The name of a firm or a product that is a first, with MR. CLEAVER. The net result of all the ink that has flowed 'household word' in this country may be quite unknown to an through the ebbing and flowing of the tide of battle is to leave his engineer in, for example, the United States and he may not take the , head erect. Such serious criticism as there has been of his conception trouble to write to this country for the full details which are omitted of the relative propulsive efficiencies of the propeller, jet and rocket from the advertisement. In the particular instance of the correspon­ has been mainly directed at minor details of expression and his main dent to whom we are referring he did bestir himself and write to us theories of the true bases of comparison have remained unchallenged. specifically to call our attention to this defect, but others who might In view of the abstruse character of the problem, and the somewhat be interested will not be so minded and thus an opportunity of inchoate nature of the knowledge of it at the time when his article spreading the gospel of British engineering genius will be lost. We was written, we feel that he is much to be congratulated on this out­ cannot do more than pass on the criticism, as we have received it, to come and, as we wrote at the time, to be commended for the good those concerned. Verbum sapientibus satis est. service he has done in dispelling the clouds that were obscuring the

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1947

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