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Organizational supports and individuals commitments through work integrated learning

Organizational supports and individuals commitments through work integrated learning Purpose– The development of individual work competencies through work integrated learning (WIL) emanates from expectations of students to learn from both the workplace and their educational institution, and an assumption that WIL stakeholders will support them. This exchange between individuals and organizational insiders, according to the social exchange norm of reciprocity, may also nurture organizational behaviors. WIL student-workers may perceive support from insiders, and orient their behaviors to increase their contribution to the host organization in terms of performance, by developing specific bonds of commitment toward different targets. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach– By designing a “WIL perception of workplace support system” including four core stakeholders as a predictor of bonds of commitments, the author tested these relationships on a sample of 2,457 co-op students enrolled in a North American University. Findings– Results globally supported the hypotheses. Student-workers perception of co-workers and supervisor supports developed commitment to team. Student-workers perception of co-workers, supervisor, and organizational supports developed commitment to the host organization and to the work. However, the effect of perception of University support on commitment to host organization and to work was non-significant. Originality/value– Given the lack of studies in the WIL field from an organizational approach, the author propose to investigate what supports are perceived by WIL student-workers, and whether these supports develop specific bonds of commitment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning Emerald Publishing

Organizational supports and individuals commitments through work integrated learning

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2042-3896
DOI
10.1108/HESWBL-07-2015-0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The development of individual work competencies through work integrated learning (WIL) emanates from expectations of students to learn from both the workplace and their educational institution, and an assumption that WIL stakeholders will support them. This exchange between individuals and organizational insiders, according to the social exchange norm of reciprocity, may also nurture organizational behaviors. WIL student-workers may perceive support from insiders, and orient their behaviors to increase their contribution to the host organization in terms of performance, by developing specific bonds of commitment toward different targets. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach– By designing a “WIL perception of workplace support system” including four core stakeholders as a predictor of bonds of commitments, the author tested these relationships on a sample of 2,457 co-op students enrolled in a North American University. Findings– Results globally supported the hypotheses. Student-workers perception of co-workers and supervisor supports developed commitment to team. Student-workers perception of co-workers, supervisor, and organizational supports developed commitment to the host organization and to the work. However, the effect of perception of University support on commitment to host organization and to work was non-significant. Originality/value– Given the lack of studies in the WIL field from an organizational approach, the author propose to investigate what supports are perceived by WIL student-workers, and whether these supports develop specific bonds of commitment.

Journal

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 8, 2016

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