Organizational commitment and hospital pharmacists

Organizational commitment and hospital pharmacists Examines the level of organizational commitment of hospital‐based pharmacists in Perth, Western Australia, and the relationship between commitment and some variables which research in other areas has suggested might be its antecedents. Argues that there are such relationships in this case as well, and that they are in the expected direction. Suggests that programmes undertaken to increase job satisfaction should have a significant impact on pharmacists’ commitment to the depart‐ment. If such programmes are successful they should result in a more highly committed workforce. Interestingly, the findings indicate that it is increased satisfaction with quality of working life and extrinsic factors (e.g. evaluation systems), rather than satisfaction with pay or job security, which has the biggest impact on commitment, and that low committed people tend to have higher stress levels than more highly committed people. Concludes, therefore, that any effort to improve organizational commitment will be beneficial in lowering stress levels in the job concerning areas such as staffing, and the perceived pressure of the job. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management Development Emerald Publishing

Organizational commitment and hospital pharmacists

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/organizational-commitment-and-hospital-pharmacists-KjnsdPxpuc
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0262-1711
DOI
10.1108/02621719610107773
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examines the level of organizational commitment of hospital‐based pharmacists in Perth, Western Australia, and the relationship between commitment and some variables which research in other areas has suggested might be its antecedents. Argues that there are such relationships in this case as well, and that they are in the expected direction. Suggests that programmes undertaken to increase job satisfaction should have a significant impact on pharmacists’ commitment to the depart‐ment. If such programmes are successful they should result in a more highly committed workforce. Interestingly, the findings indicate that it is increased satisfaction with quality of working life and extrinsic factors (e.g. evaluation systems), rather than satisfaction with pay or job security, which has the biggest impact on commitment, and that low committed people tend to have higher stress levels than more highly committed people. Concludes, therefore, that any effort to improve organizational commitment will be beneficial in lowering stress levels in the job concerning areas such as staffing, and the perceived pressure of the job.

Journal

Journal of Management DevelopmentEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1996

Keywords: Australia; Commitment; Hospitals; Job satisfaction; Pharmaceutical industry

References

  • Age and job satisfaction
    O’Brien, G.E.; Dowling, P.
  • A note on procedures for testing the quality of a clustering of a set of objects
    Milligan, G.W.; Mahajan, V.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off