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Optimum Climb to Height

Optimum Climb to Height TWO distinct types of climb arise in aviation. In the first, it is necessary to climb to a given height without attaching any importance to horizontal distance covered. An example is a climb to take up patrol at a given height. Obviously the quickest way to do this is to climb at the maximum rate of climb possible at each instant. The second type of climb is more important. In this it is necessary to climb to cruising height while, at the same time, travelling as far as possible in a certain horizontal direction. Examples are the initial climb of transport 'planes and bombers, and the chasing climb of a fighter which has taken off to pursue an enemy. It seems possible that the first type of climb is not the best in this case a flatter climb, such as that shown dotted in Fig. 1, may have a horizontal speed sufficiently great to more than compensate for the extra time required to reach cruising heightvertical distances are exaggerated to show more clearly. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TWO distinct types of climb arise in aviation. In the first, it is necessary to climb to a given height without attaching any importance to horizontal distance covered. An example is a climb to take up patrol at a given height. Obviously the quickest way to do this is to climb at the maximum rate of climb possible at each instant. The second type of climb is more important. In this it is necessary to climb to cruising height while, at the same time, travelling as far as possible in a certain horizontal direction. Examples are the initial climb of transport 'planes and bombers, and the chasing climb of a fighter which has taken off to pursue an enemy. It seems possible that the first type of climb is not the best in this case a flatter climb, such as that shown dotted in Fig. 1, may have a horizontal speed sufficiently great to more than compensate for the extra time required to reach cruising heightvertical distances are exaggerated to show more clearly.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1940

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