Online media rivalry A latent class model for mobile and PC internet users

Online media rivalry A latent class model for mobile and PC internet users Purpose – This study aims to identify distinct online media user segments on the basis of three media theories, namely media displacement theory, media complementarity theory and media richness theory. Design/methodology/approach – A large‐scale, mobile‐based web survey was conducted in Japan to assess behavioural variables (media time allocation, media richness perceptions, and media access motives) and demographics. Findings – The latent class model reveals four distinct media user segments: dual media users (i.e. users of the internet on both the mobile and the PC); mobile internet users; PC internet users; and passive online users. Dual media users are likely to: spend more time on information searching; perceive greater levels of media richness in online media; and share common motives for accessing internet media via both mobile and PC. The findings are consistent with our theoretical expectations. Research limitations and implications – Any exploratory clustering of consumers is by definition a snapshot that depends on time and place. Consequently the findings would very likely have been different if the underlying data had been sampled at another time or in different locations. Despite this limitation the findings corroborate some of the basic tenets of theories of media competition and complementarity. Practical implications – The fact that almost a third of online media users access internet content via both mobile and PC suggests the increasing importance of cross‐media strategies. Originality/value – This is a pioneering study that examines media competition and complementarity between the mobile internet and the PC internet. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Online Information Review Emerald Publishing

Online media rivalry A latent class model for mobile and PC internet users

Online Information Review, Volume 34 (1): 17 – Feb 23, 2010

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1468-4527
DOI
10.1108/14684521011024146
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to identify distinct online media user segments on the basis of three media theories, namely media displacement theory, media complementarity theory and media richness theory. Design/methodology/approach – A large‐scale, mobile‐based web survey was conducted in Japan to assess behavioural variables (media time allocation, media richness perceptions, and media access motives) and demographics. Findings – The latent class model reveals four distinct media user segments: dual media users (i.e. users of the internet on both the mobile and the PC); mobile internet users; PC internet users; and passive online users. Dual media users are likely to: spend more time on information searching; perceive greater levels of media richness in online media; and share common motives for accessing internet media via both mobile and PC. The findings are consistent with our theoretical expectations. Research limitations and implications – Any exploratory clustering of consumers is by definition a snapshot that depends on time and place. Consequently the findings would very likely have been different if the underlying data had been sampled at another time or in different locations. Despite this limitation the findings corroborate some of the basic tenets of theories of media competition and complementarity. Practical implications – The fact that almost a third of online media users access internet content via both mobile and PC suggests the increasing importance of cross‐media strategies. Originality/value – This is a pioneering study that examines media competition and complementarity between the mobile internet and the PC internet.

Journal

Online Information ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 23, 2010

Keywords: Internet; Japan; Mobile communication systems; Computers

References

  • Exploring the implications of m‐commerce for markets and marketing
    Balasubraman, S.; Peterson, R.A.; Jarvenpaa, S.L.
  • The theory of the niche: quantifying competition among media industries
    Dimmick, J.; Rothenbuhler, E.W.
  • What do we know about mobile Internet adopters? A cluster analysis
    Okazaki, S.
  • Comparing internet and mobile phone usage: digital divides of usage, adoption, and dropouts
    Rice, R.E.; Katz, J.E.
  • Guidelines for conducting research and publishing in marketing: from conceptualization through the review process
    Summers, J.O.

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