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On unconventional lines

On unconventional lines May 1945 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 125 all by pointing out so clearly what serious investigators have been aiming at and striving to achieve. Aircraft Engineering Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical An Educational Role Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering Whatever advantages the tailless aeroplane may have over its more conventional brother we feel that it has one great merit from Professio n the purely scientific or technical point of view. It raises so many fresh problems in stability and control in such acute forms that Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.At.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. it is worth investigation and experimentation if only for the reason that if solutions can be found for the difficulties it provides, an enor­ Vol. XVII. No. 195 May, 1945 mous amount of light will be thrown on these problems in their general aspect; from which aviation as a whole cannot help but bene­ fit. Indeed we arc not at all sure that every budding aeroplane de­ signer might not fruitfully be set the tailless aeroplane as an exercise E conclude in' this issue a series of articles on the tailless to test his ingenuity and give him an idea of the complexity of the aeroplane which has occupied a considerable proportion of whole subject of control. If this were made a necessary introduction each issue over a period of six months. In the result, this to a consideration of the design of an aeroplane fitted with an scries constitutes a survey of the subject which has never previously empennage, we believe tha t he would feel such a sense of relief at the been approached in completeness. comparative simplicity of the later task that he would find many puzzling matters surprisingly easy of comprehension. It may seem somewhat iconoclastic to the tailless enthusiast to suggest that his Accumulated Knowledge favourite type should be looked upon as providing a test of in­ genuity rather than as an end in itself, but we are not at all sure The author, MR. A. R. WKYL, has now been an occasional con­ that it would not be educationally sound. At any rate, wc are quite tributor to these columns for twelve years—his first article, on convinced that no aeroplane designer, young or old, would be any "The Design of Commercial Aeroplanes", running through three the worse for studying MR. WEYL'S admirably clear expositions of issues in 1933—and the variety of the subjects.on which he has the intricacies of stability and control—first in an elementary written is evidence of the catholicity of his knowledge and experi­ form in their general aspect and later in the more complex guise ence. His outstanding characteristic, which makes all his contri­ they assume when the problem-solving tail is removed. butions unusually interesting, is his encyclopaedic knowledge of what has happened in the past and familiarity with the work of research workers and experimenters in almost any branch of The Problem of the Future aeronautics from the earliest days down to the present time. He has put this accumulated knowledge to good purpose for the information MR. WEYL has charmed so wisely that lie has almost made of us and benefit of readers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING in connexion with converts to the thesis that the tailless type is inevitably the aero­ tailless aeroplanes in the first three of the series of articles to which plane of the future. We still feel, however, that the fuselage has we are referring, in which he gave a very complete, if not exhaustive, developed so many advantages in the provision of storage space for account of the many investigations and experiments in this type loads of all kinds—from passenger to projectiles—that it has* long that have been carried out from time to time over many years. gone beyond its original function as a mere link between wings and In the course of this historical survey he, incidentally, rescued from tail and has become more of an asset than a liability and ex­ oblivion the name of a forgotten British pioneer, RICHARD HARTE, crescence to be-discarded as soon as may be. We still continue whose contributions to the subject had been completely overlooked. contumaciously to view it more from the educational than the prac­ tical point of view. Prominent Names I t is curious to find in juxtaposition to HARTE the name of PENAUD as a patentee of an aeroplane of this specialized type, in A QUESTION OF PRIORITY view of the fact that most of us had always looked upon him as the We have ,bcen asked to bring to the notice of British Aircraft true originator of the tail as a scientifically considered device for design staffs, by publishing it in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, the paper longitudinal stability and control - as indeed he was. Coming to by MR. A. L. KLEIN of the DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT CORPORATION-on more recent times, the names of DUNNE and HILL in England, "Fundamentals of Aeroplane Design" which appears in this issue. HORTEN and LIPPISCH in Germany and NORTHROP in America, Originally read at the S.A.E. National Aeronautic Meeting a year stand out as investigators who did, and in some instances still are ago, it was printed in the S.A.E. Journal for December, 1944. It doing, more than just grope blindly in the dark. Indeed, it will will not, therefore, be new to many of our American readers but the probably be a surprise to many to learn how much serious and source from which it was indicated to us that it would be helplul for intelligent work has been done on the peculiar problems associated it to appear also in these columns was one which we could not ignore with this type. Few, in fact; except those who have investigated the and we trust that in view of this they will forgive its second ap­ subject for their own purposes, will be aware how much actual flying pearance. experience has already been gained-with the type. In which con­ nexion MR. WEYL does well to enter a caveat against excessive MR. KLEIN brings a welcome breath of fresh air into the occa­ optimism resulting from successful experiments with gliders, since sionally, if we may be forgiven for saying so, rather stuffy atmo­ the introduction of the engine and airscrew very markedly alters sphere of the design office with a plea that first things shall be put matters. It may be that here is a case where jet propulsion may first and that the ultimate effect of various designfeatures in opera­ possibly throw a different light on the picture and help towards a tion shall be envisaged. He does well to emphasize the importance of solution. weight-saving and points the moral of his tale by some striking instances of "horrible examples". We like immensely, for instance, There is no doubt that the tailless type has a fascination which his example of the aeroplane in which ease of maintenance features has had unfortunate results in so often attracting those without the had been carried to such excess. "A good layout of the equipment requisite qualification or knowledge to provide any ground for on an aeroplane will-save more weight than the use of the latest and serious progress. It is this feature which has led it to be so widely fanciest alloys together with the best possible structure" is a real looked upon as a pure freak with no real merit or advantage behind apophthegm. it. MR. WEYL has at least succeeded in killing this idea once and for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

On unconventional lines

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 17 (5): 1 – May 1, 1945

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031245
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

May 1945 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 125 all by pointing out so clearly what serious investigators have been aiming at and striving to achieve. Aircraft Engineering Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical An Educational Role Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering Whatever advantages the tailless aeroplane may have over its more conventional brother we feel that it has one great merit from Professio n the purely scientific or technical point of view. It raises so many fresh problems in stability and control in such acute forms that Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.At.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. it is worth investigation and experimentation if only for the reason that if solutions can be found for the difficulties it provides, an enor­ Vol. XVII. No. 195 May, 1945 mous amount of light will be thrown on these problems in their general aspect; from which aviation as a whole cannot help but bene­ fit. Indeed we arc not at all sure that every budding aeroplane de­ signer might not fruitfully be set the tailless aeroplane as an exercise E conclude in' this issue a series of articles on the tailless to test his ingenuity and give him an idea of the complexity of the aeroplane which has occupied a considerable proportion of whole subject of control. If this were made a necessary introduction each issue over a period of six months. In the result, this to a consideration of the design of an aeroplane fitted with an scries constitutes a survey of the subject which has never previously empennage, we believe tha t he would feel such a sense of relief at the been approached in completeness. comparative simplicity of the later task that he would find many puzzling matters surprisingly easy of comprehension. It may seem somewhat iconoclastic to the tailless enthusiast to suggest that his Accumulated Knowledge favourite type should be looked upon as providing a test of in­ genuity rather than as an end in itself, but we are not at all sure The author, MR. A. R. WKYL, has now been an occasional con­ that it would not be educationally sound. At any rate, wc are quite tributor to these columns for twelve years—his first article, on convinced that no aeroplane designer, young or old, would be any "The Design of Commercial Aeroplanes", running through three the worse for studying MR. WEYL'S admirably clear expositions of issues in 1933—and the variety of the subjects.on which he has the intricacies of stability and control—first in an elementary written is evidence of the catholicity of his knowledge and experi­ form in their general aspect and later in the more complex guise ence. His outstanding characteristic, which makes all his contri­ they assume when the problem-solving tail is removed. butions unusually interesting, is his encyclopaedic knowledge of what has happened in the past and familiarity with the work of research workers and experimenters in almost any branch of The Problem of the Future aeronautics from the earliest days down to the present time. He has put this accumulated knowledge to good purpose for the information MR. WEYL has charmed so wisely that lie has almost made of us and benefit of readers of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING in connexion with converts to the thesis that the tailless type is inevitably the aero­ tailless aeroplanes in the first three of the series of articles to which plane of the future. We still feel, however, that the fuselage has we are referring, in which he gave a very complete, if not exhaustive, developed so many advantages in the provision of storage space for account of the many investigations and experiments in this type loads of all kinds—from passenger to projectiles—that it has* long that have been carried out from time to time over many years. gone beyond its original function as a mere link between wings and In the course of this historical survey he, incidentally, rescued from tail and has become more of an asset than a liability and ex­ oblivion the name of a forgotten British pioneer, RICHARD HARTE, crescence to be-discarded as soon as may be. We still continue whose contributions to the subject had been completely overlooked. contumaciously to view it more from the educational than the prac­ tical point of view. Prominent Names I t is curious to find in juxtaposition to HARTE the name of PENAUD as a patentee of an aeroplane of this specialized type, in A QUESTION OF PRIORITY view of the fact that most of us had always looked upon him as the We have ,bcen asked to bring to the notice of British Aircraft true originator of the tail as a scientifically considered device for design staffs, by publishing it in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, the paper longitudinal stability and control - as indeed he was. Coming to by MR. A. L. KLEIN of the DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT CORPORATION-on more recent times, the names of DUNNE and HILL in England, "Fundamentals of Aeroplane Design" which appears in this issue. HORTEN and LIPPISCH in Germany and NORTHROP in America, Originally read at the S.A.E. National Aeronautic Meeting a year stand out as investigators who did, and in some instances still are ago, it was printed in the S.A.E. Journal for December, 1944. It doing, more than just grope blindly in the dark. Indeed, it will will not, therefore, be new to many of our American readers but the probably be a surprise to many to learn how much serious and source from which it was indicated to us that it would be helplul for intelligent work has been done on the peculiar problems associated it to appear also in these columns was one which we could not ignore with this type. Few, in fact; except those who have investigated the and we trust that in view of this they will forgive its second ap­ subject for their own purposes, will be aware how much actual flying pearance. experience has already been gained-with the type. In which con­ nexion MR. WEYL does well to enter a caveat against excessive MR. KLEIN brings a welcome breath of fresh air into the occa­ optimism resulting from successful experiments with gliders, since sionally, if we may be forgiven for saying so, rather stuffy atmo­ the introduction of the engine and airscrew very markedly alters sphere of the design office with a plea that first things shall be put matters. It may be that here is a case where jet propulsion may first and that the ultimate effect of various designfeatures in opera­ possibly throw a different light on the picture and help towards a tion shall be envisaged. He does well to emphasize the importance of solution. weight-saving and points the moral of his tale by some striking instances of "horrible examples". We like immensely, for instance, There is no doubt that the tailless type has a fascination which his example of the aeroplane in which ease of maintenance features has had unfortunate results in so often attracting those without the had been carried to such excess. "A good layout of the equipment requisite qualification or knowledge to provide any ground for on an aeroplane will-save more weight than the use of the latest and serious progress. It is this feature which has led it to be so widely fanciest alloys together with the best possible structure" is a real looked upon as a pure freak with no real merit or advantage behind apophthegm. it. MR. WEYL has at least succeeded in killing this idea once and for

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1945

There are no references for this article.