Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

On the end of the queue

On the end of the queue Editorial commen This is not an easy time to talk about employment of the handicapped. In spite of hopeful signs, this country will have a long dole queue for many, many months. Standing in it are hundreds of thousands of fit and able men and women—anxious to provide for their families once again, and desperate to lose the social stigma of being out of work. But such queues should not automatically be headed by those who can literally stand on their own two feet. On that basis, people who need a bit of a helping hand would never reach the front and get jobs that they really are able to do. Even in easier times it was often like that, and lately things have been extraordinarily difficult. Now it seems, the economy is starting to lift. Every management man must be bursting to really see it take off. But, with things gathering momentum, it would be understandable if the handicapped were, not exactly forgotten, but just not remembered. That it why it is important for companies to think about the problem today. Each charity asks for money, that is its purpose in life. But each individual handicapped person is not asking for charity when he looks for a job . The first thing that most employers who have used such labour will tell you is that, once settled, a handicapped worker has more interest in the job, and more company loyalty than the average employee. Mistakenly, some would assume that these qualities stem from gratitude towards a firm which has put itself out to find a vacancy. The handicapped have to face the world with physical disabilities; and often, it cannot be ignored, they are awkward-looking in their movements. It is just these sort of things, however—together with the discomfort felt when others take the easy way out and label them as 'the responsibility of the state' —that makes the handicapped so determined to prove themselves. This is what often makes them such good employees; plus the fact that something like spastic disability does not equate with lack of intelligence. There are many with fine, indeed university, qualifications. Compared with the total out of work, the handicapped are only a tiny fraction. That doesn't make it any less of a problem. Looked at another way, it should make it easier to solve. Societies like the Spastics get over a lot of the early difficulties even before they arise. That is, they take an individual, do searching ability and personality tests, and then guide that person towards suitable work. But there's no question of branding someone as a particular type of worker. Young handicapped people often have precise ambitions. The social workers maintain that too many firms say they employ the required number of disabled by going along to personnel and finding that 'old Fred in despatch has lost the top of a finger'. If they com­ plain, it only gets those companies on the defensive and, therefore, not open to reasonable suggestions about employment. What must also be stressed is that, for the young handicapped person, the first jo b is so very important. Lately, so many have not only had the usual difficulty in obtaining a suitable vacancy but in getting any job at all. Nobody is badgering anybody—all that management is being asked to do is to give sympathetic consideration to their plight and to look honestly for ways to help. JUNE 1972 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Management Emerald Publishing

On the end of the queue

Industrial Management , Volume 72 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1972

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/on-the-end-of-the-queue-89sjDYMX4u
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-6929
DOI
10.1108/eb056198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial commen This is not an easy time to talk about employment of the handicapped. In spite of hopeful signs, this country will have a long dole queue for many, many months. Standing in it are hundreds of thousands of fit and able men and women—anxious to provide for their families once again, and desperate to lose the social stigma of being out of work. But such queues should not automatically be headed by those who can literally stand on their own two feet. On that basis, people who need a bit of a helping hand would never reach the front and get jobs that they really are able to do. Even in easier times it was often like that, and lately things have been extraordinarily difficult. Now it seems, the economy is starting to lift. Every management man must be bursting to really see it take off. But, with things gathering momentum, it would be understandable if the handicapped were, not exactly forgotten, but just not remembered. That it why it is important for companies to think about the problem today. Each charity asks for money, that is its purpose in life. But each individual handicapped person is not asking for charity when he looks for a job . The first thing that most employers who have used such labour will tell you is that, once settled, a handicapped worker has more interest in the job, and more company loyalty than the average employee. Mistakenly, some would assume that these qualities stem from gratitude towards a firm which has put itself out to find a vacancy. The handicapped have to face the world with physical disabilities; and often, it cannot be ignored, they are awkward-looking in their movements. It is just these sort of things, however—together with the discomfort felt when others take the easy way out and label them as 'the responsibility of the state' —that makes the handicapped so determined to prove themselves. This is what often makes them such good employees; plus the fact that something like spastic disability does not equate with lack of intelligence. There are many with fine, indeed university, qualifications. Compared with the total out of work, the handicapped are only a tiny fraction. That doesn't make it any less of a problem. Looked at another way, it should make it easier to solve. Societies like the Spastics get over a lot of the early difficulties even before they arise. That is, they take an individual, do searching ability and personality tests, and then guide that person towards suitable work. But there's no question of branding someone as a particular type of worker. Young handicapped people often have precise ambitions. The social workers maintain that too many firms say they employ the required number of disabled by going along to personnel and finding that 'old Fred in despatch has lost the top of a finger'. If they com­ plain, it only gets those companies on the defensive and, therefore, not open to reasonable suggestions about employment. What must also be stressed is that, for the young handicapped person, the first jo b is so very important. Lately, so many have not only had the usual difficulty in obtaining a suitable vacancy but in getting any job at all. Nobody is badgering anybody—all that management is being asked to do is to give sympathetic consideration to their plight and to look honestly for ways to help. JUNE 1972

Journal

Industrial ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1972

There are no references for this article.