On the beat: variations in the patrolling styles of the police officer

On the beat: variations in the patrolling styles of the police officer Purpose – This article seeks to look at the police officer on patrol. It aims to explore three categories of work undertaken during periods of un‐tasked patrol where officers can self‐direct their work. Design/methodology/approach – Informed by empirical data from an ethnographic study of front line community policing in Britain, the categories of work are illustrated through the profile(s) of officer(s) whose actions best support each style. Findings – The coming together of officers with different skills and the propensity to undertake different types of police work can broaden the community policing philosophy as well as the practice itself. While an expansive policing mandate can be used to justify and explain the pursuit of preferential areas of police work by the patrolling officer, findings also uncover evidence of the persistence of police practices and attitudes that alienate certain community groups. Research limitations/implications – Given the sustained popularity of localized policing models, further ethnographies are needed to broaden the analysis of patrol work particularly as additional research of this kind conducted with different groups of officers may well reveal evidence of different patrol styles. Practical implications – If the full potential of community policing is to be recognized then the police service needs to encourage front line officers to devise ways of learning about, making contact with, and working with, the diverse groups that comprise local communities. However, introducing new policies and working practices needs to be accompanied by attitudinal and behavioural change. Originality/value – The paper presents a new and original set of patrolling styles of the police officer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Ethnography Emerald Publishing

On the beat: variations in the patrolling styles of the police officer

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, Volume 1 (2): 21 – Aug 24, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/on-the-beat-variations-in-the-patrolling-styles-of-the-police-officer-B9Oxz0Y4J5
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2046-6749
DOI
10.1108/20466741211248868
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This article seeks to look at the police officer on patrol. It aims to explore three categories of work undertaken during periods of un‐tasked patrol where officers can self‐direct their work. Design/methodology/approach – Informed by empirical data from an ethnographic study of front line community policing in Britain, the categories of work are illustrated through the profile(s) of officer(s) whose actions best support each style. Findings – The coming together of officers with different skills and the propensity to undertake different types of police work can broaden the community policing philosophy as well as the practice itself. While an expansive policing mandate can be used to justify and explain the pursuit of preferential areas of police work by the patrolling officer, findings also uncover evidence of the persistence of police practices and attitudes that alienate certain community groups. Research limitations/implications – Given the sustained popularity of localized policing models, further ethnographies are needed to broaden the analysis of patrol work particularly as additional research of this kind conducted with different groups of officers may well reveal evidence of different patrol styles. Practical implications – If the full potential of community policing is to be recognized then the police service needs to encourage front line officers to devise ways of learning about, making contact with, and working with, the diverse groups that comprise local communities. However, introducing new policies and working practices needs to be accompanied by attitudinal and behavioural change. Originality/value – The paper presents a new and original set of patrolling styles of the police officer.

Journal

Journal of Organizational EthnographyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 24, 2012

Keywords: Community policing; Police patrol; Ethnography; Police occupational culture; Policing

References

  • Changing police culture
    Chan, J.
  • Community Policing
    Fielding, N.
  • Theorizing community policing
    Fielding, N.G.
  • What's your problem? Signal crimes and citizen‐focused problem solving
    Innes, M.
  • The Politics of the Police
    Reiner, R.
  • Police (canteen) sub‐culture. An appreciation
    Waddington, P.A.J.
  • Broken windows
    Wilson, J.Q.; Kelling, G.L.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month