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OILING THE STEAMER

OILING THE STEAMER A lesser known strength of Texaco is as a supplier of lubricants to the operators of old steam engines. The cylinders of a steam engine may present the easiest or the most difficult lubrication problem of any machinery. Some vertical steam engines, operating with very wet steam, require no lubricating oil and behave quite satisfactorily with the lubricatio n provided by the condensed water. On the other hand, where engines operate under extremely high superheat it is impossible to provide 100 per cent lubrication and heavy wear of the piston rings can be experienced. The temperature of the steam in a cylinder may be from something above the normal boiling point of water, say 125°C, up to 400°C or even higher. Cylinder lubrication is always separate from the lubrication of the bearings or crosshead, with oil fed into the steam pipe by a mechanical lubricator , where it becomes powered locomotives. Recently distributed in finely divided particles restored by the "Duke of Gloucester" throughout the steam in the cylinder. Trust Preservation Society, the engine Cylinder lubricants are very viscous now has an active life in the summer oils with low volatility. Where the pulling excursion trains from Crewe steam is wet from condensation to Anglesey and back. before it reaches the cylinder, fatty One problem has been excessive additives will help the oil to adhere wear of the piston rings operating in bette r to the cylinder walls. steam with a superheat to over 400°C, Compounde d oils are therefore in spite of using a cylinder oil with a generally used for wet steam. viscosity of 1,000 cSt. Texaco Research in Ghent came up with a Texaco has supplied a 550 cSt possible solution in the form of one compounded oil for the 60 year old their CLAVIS grades, a straight 40 rpm inclined steam engine mineral oil with a viscosity of 1,500 powering the "Kingswear Castle" the cSt at 40°C. A product somewhere oldest coal-fired paddle steamer between honey and tar in consistency. afloat, now operating on the Medway. This oil is now in use and appears to The "Waverley", the only ocean-going be working well in the very hostile paddle steamer still in commission environment where temperatures are around England also has its steam high enough to cause oil cracking in engine oils supplied by Texaco. the valve chest. The demand for steam cylinder oils today is understandably rather small, but these very viscous Duke of Gloucester "cylinder oils" still find applications as Built in Crewe in 1954, the 3,000 worm-gear lubricants where speeds are horsepower "Duke of Gloucester" very low. proved to be the last of an era as British Rail decided to move to diesel 4 Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Vol. 44 No. 5. 1992, p. 4, MCB University Press. 0036-8792 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

OILING THE STEAMER

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 44 (5): 1 – May 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb053421
Publisher site
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Abstract

A lesser known strength of Texaco is as a supplier of lubricants to the operators of old steam engines. The cylinders of a steam engine may present the easiest or the most difficult lubrication problem of any machinery. Some vertical steam engines, operating with very wet steam, require no lubricating oil and behave quite satisfactorily with the lubricatio n provided by the condensed water. On the other hand, where engines operate under extremely high superheat it is impossible to provide 100 per cent lubrication and heavy wear of the piston rings can be experienced. The temperature of the steam in a cylinder may be from something above the normal boiling point of water, say 125°C, up to 400°C or even higher. Cylinder lubrication is always separate from the lubrication of the bearings or crosshead, with oil fed into the steam pipe by a mechanical lubricator , where it becomes powered locomotives. Recently distributed in finely divided particles restored by the "Duke of Gloucester" throughout the steam in the cylinder. Trust Preservation Society, the engine Cylinder lubricants are very viscous now has an active life in the summer oils with low volatility. Where the pulling excursion trains from Crewe steam is wet from condensation to Anglesey and back. before it reaches the cylinder, fatty One problem has been excessive additives will help the oil to adhere wear of the piston rings operating in bette r to the cylinder walls. steam with a superheat to over 400°C, Compounde d oils are therefore in spite of using a cylinder oil with a generally used for wet steam. viscosity of 1,000 cSt. Texaco Research in Ghent came up with a Texaco has supplied a 550 cSt possible solution in the form of one compounded oil for the 60 year old their CLAVIS grades, a straight 40 rpm inclined steam engine mineral oil with a viscosity of 1,500 powering the "Kingswear Castle" the cSt at 40°C. A product somewhere oldest coal-fired paddle steamer between honey and tar in consistency. afloat, now operating on the Medway. This oil is now in use and appears to The "Waverley", the only ocean-going be working well in the very hostile paddle steamer still in commission environment where temperatures are around England also has its steam high enough to cause oil cracking in engine oils supplied by Texaco. the valve chest. The demand for steam cylinder oils today is understandably rather small, but these very viscous Duke of Gloucester "cylinder oils" still find applications as Built in Crewe in 1954, the 3,000 worm-gear lubricants where speeds are horsepower "Duke of Gloucester" very low. proved to be the last of an era as British Rail decided to move to diesel 4 Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Vol. 44 No. 5. 1992, p. 4, MCB University Press. 0036-8792

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1992

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