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Of Shoes and Ships

Of Shoes and Ships Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXV No 296 OCTOBER 1953 Of Shoes and Ships A New Development A closely allied subject which occurred to us as most noticeable T was generally agreed that 1953 did not provide a 'vintage' was the remarkable differences of opinion as to the best place to put S.B.A.C. Display in the same sense as 1952—or even, indeed, air brakes. Those raised above and below the wing surface—in the I most of the post-war shows. There were only four completely dive-brake style originated we believe by Junkers—are of course a new types of aeroplane flown in public for the first time—the Victor, commonplace, but we now have them spreading to the fuselage, the P. 111 A, the Seamew and the S.B.5—though there were of course ranging in position from the forward end in the 'star' pattern ex­ new marks of various others, many with bigger and better engines. emplified in the Boulton Paul delta to the protruding side panels at Jn the same way, the new regulations in regard to the flying, desirable the rear end as dramatically displayed in the Handley Page Victor. though they were, did undoubtedly make the demonstrations by The only variety we failed to find was the split rudder opening out the pilots less, shall we say, exciting than they had in recent years to form a vertical surface to the line of flight which was used, if become. memory serves, round about 1912 in one of Sir Alliott Verdon Roe's This is not to decry the show but merely to state facts, which, biplanes. We look forward to seeing that device revived, as a result admittedly, to a large extent give a superficial and misleading impres­ of this hint, in 1954. sion. When one got down to detail it became clear that there was much of very considerable interest to be noticed. It can indeed be The New Materials argued that the lack of high-lights was a good thing as being indi­ cative of a period of consolidation when it is possible to take note To strike a more serious note, it was most interesting to see how of certain trends, some of which may prove to be of considerable the use of plastics is spreading beyond the sphere of cockpit cowlings significance for the future. and astrodomes into places which come more truly within the definition of parts of the airframe. It would seem that their adapt­ Jets and turbo-props have become accepted as common objects ability is leading to their introduction for some of what may be of the aircraft world—even sonic bangs and booms have for some described as the more awkward parts of the surfaces where by their of us lost their thrill—and the chief interest lies in watching how nature they are suited to separate construction as moulded compo­ different designers go out to meet the same problems. nents easily applied and put into position. Instances of cases of this character which seemed to be new were to be found in the Individuality and Variety plastic wing tips of the Seamew—they are of course already com­ monly found as coverings for navigation lights—and the formation One of the outstanding impressions one has brought away is the of fin tips from similar substances in several types of civil aircraft. continuing increase in the complication and variety of what may be We are still perhaps some way from the complete plastic wing— described as slottery and flappery. Some of the machines when they though these have of course been produced experimentally—but came in to land had the impression of being provided with the rapid development is taking place in these materials, which seem smallest possible area of fixed wing surface as a vehicle for carrying likely to have many advantages from the constructional point of the largest possible number of slots, flaps, air-brakes and what-not view, and there is no question whatever that they will be more and to destroy as completely and rapidly as possible the aerodynamic more widely used in the aircraft of the future. Another instance we efficiency needed for the phenomenal performance in near-sonic noted of a new use was the plastic cabin floor of the Beaver. flight. The variety of these ancillaries was quite astonishing and most bewildering. Whether eventually some order will arise out of this There was a noteworthy, though perhaps small, increase in the apparent present chaos remains to be seen. At the moment the per­ number of aeroplanes designed for strictly limited special purposes mutations and combinations available and used appear to be limited shown this year. The Pioneer which we have seen before, though it only by the number of individual designers concerned. It does not appeared in a developed form, is a striking example of what can be seem possible that they are all right and one cannot help having a done in the modern manner for Army co-operation use; the Beaver feeling—probably quite unjustified—that one day an aerodynamic is another instance of an aeroplane produced with a special end in pundit will arise who will clear up and simplify the whole issue. On view, as is, in a different class, the Seamew which, though not that happy day we shall presumably know whether a flap, for instance, particularly outstanding in performance, is obviously exactly what should be on the leading or trailing edge, inboard or outboard, and the Royal Navy needs for anti-submarine operations. The Short running to the tip or stopping short thereof—and why. Though no S.B.5 provided a most interesting study of an aeroplane in which, doubt even our pundit will safeguard himself and his vulnerable while the basic design remains unaltered, full-scale research can be reputation by saying that all will depend on the purpose for which carried out on such matters as sweep-back and arrangement of tail the flap is required—as indeed it will. surfaces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Of Shoes and Ships

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 25 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1953

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032341
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXV No 296 OCTOBER 1953 Of Shoes and Ships A New Development A closely allied subject which occurred to us as most noticeable T was generally agreed that 1953 did not provide a 'vintage' was the remarkable differences of opinion as to the best place to put S.B.A.C. Display in the same sense as 1952—or even, indeed, air brakes. Those raised above and below the wing surface—in the I most of the post-war shows. There were only four completely dive-brake style originated we believe by Junkers—are of course a new types of aeroplane flown in public for the first time—the Victor, commonplace, but we now have them spreading to the fuselage, the P. 111 A, the Seamew and the S.B.5—though there were of course ranging in position from the forward end in the 'star' pattern ex­ new marks of various others, many with bigger and better engines. emplified in the Boulton Paul delta to the protruding side panels at Jn the same way, the new regulations in regard to the flying, desirable the rear end as dramatically displayed in the Handley Page Victor. though they were, did undoubtedly make the demonstrations by The only variety we failed to find was the split rudder opening out the pilots less, shall we say, exciting than they had in recent years to form a vertical surface to the line of flight which was used, if become. memory serves, round about 1912 in one of Sir Alliott Verdon Roe's This is not to decry the show but merely to state facts, which, biplanes. We look forward to seeing that device revived, as a result admittedly, to a large extent give a superficial and misleading impres­ of this hint, in 1954. sion. When one got down to detail it became clear that there was much of very considerable interest to be noticed. It can indeed be The New Materials argued that the lack of high-lights was a good thing as being indi­ cative of a period of consolidation when it is possible to take note To strike a more serious note, it was most interesting to see how of certain trends, some of which may prove to be of considerable the use of plastics is spreading beyond the sphere of cockpit cowlings significance for the future. and astrodomes into places which come more truly within the definition of parts of the airframe. It would seem that their adapt­ Jets and turbo-props have become accepted as common objects ability is leading to their introduction for some of what may be of the aircraft world—even sonic bangs and booms have for some described as the more awkward parts of the surfaces where by their of us lost their thrill—and the chief interest lies in watching how nature they are suited to separate construction as moulded compo­ different designers go out to meet the same problems. nents easily applied and put into position. Instances of cases of this character which seemed to be new were to be found in the Individuality and Variety plastic wing tips of the Seamew—they are of course already com­ monly found as coverings for navigation lights—and the formation One of the outstanding impressions one has brought away is the of fin tips from similar substances in several types of civil aircraft. continuing increase in the complication and variety of what may be We are still perhaps some way from the complete plastic wing— described as slottery and flappery. Some of the machines when they though these have of course been produced experimentally—but came in to land had the impression of being provided with the rapid development is taking place in these materials, which seem smallest possible area of fixed wing surface as a vehicle for carrying likely to have many advantages from the constructional point of the largest possible number of slots, flaps, air-brakes and what-not view, and there is no question whatever that they will be more and to destroy as completely and rapidly as possible the aerodynamic more widely used in the aircraft of the future. Another instance we efficiency needed for the phenomenal performance in near-sonic noted of a new use was the plastic cabin floor of the Beaver. flight. The variety of these ancillaries was quite astonishing and most bewildering. Whether eventually some order will arise out of this There was a noteworthy, though perhaps small, increase in the apparent present chaos remains to be seen. At the moment the per­ number of aeroplanes designed for strictly limited special purposes mutations and combinations available and used appear to be limited shown this year. The Pioneer which we have seen before, though it only by the number of individual designers concerned. It does not appeared in a developed form, is a striking example of what can be seem possible that they are all right and one cannot help having a done in the modern manner for Army co-operation use; the Beaver feeling—probably quite unjustified—that one day an aerodynamic is another instance of an aeroplane produced with a special end in pundit will arise who will clear up and simplify the whole issue. On view, as is, in a different class, the Seamew which, though not that happy day we shall presumably know whether a flap, for instance, particularly outstanding in performance, is obviously exactly what should be on the leading or trailing edge, inboard or outboard, and the Royal Navy needs for anti-submarine operations. The Short running to the tip or stopping short thereof—and why. Though no S.B.5 provided a most interesting study of an aeroplane in which, doubt even our pundit will safeguard himself and his vulnerable while the basic design remains unaltered, full-scale research can be reputation by saying that all will depend on the purpose for which carried out on such matters as sweep-back and arrangement of tail the flap is required—as indeed it will. surfaces.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1953

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