Nutritional information on restaurant menus Who cares and why restauranteurs should bother

Nutritional information on restaurant menus Who cares and why restauranteurs should bother Purpose – Dining out is integral to the American lifestyle. Diners want to make informed choices. The purpose of this research is to measure consumers' need for, and attitudes toward, nutritional information (NI) on menus in full‐service restaurants. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 502 participants at a full‐service restaurant on a university campus, through a survey questionnaire. Correlations, ANOVA, and descriptive statistics were utilized for data analysis. Findings – Some market segments would dine out more often in restaurants if NI was made available. Segments concerned about NI are females, those aged 35 to 65, and those belonging to the higher income and college‐educated strata. Consumers eating healthy food at home are more likely to use NI in restaurants, as are those who dine out as a necessity. NI that consumers are most concerned about concerns fat, saturated fat, and trans‐fat. Research limitations/implications – The current study is limited by a one‐location cross‐sectional design. Future studies should be longitudinal and be conducted in multiple locations. Practical implications – A deeper understanding of consumers' concern could permit restaurateurs to use NI on menus to their competitive advantage, by effectively deploying a market segmentation strategy. Originality/value – This research adds new knowledge to the present body of hospitality literature. This paper will assist managers by providing insights into the specifics of the target markets of who needs NI, and the context in which they will use NI on menus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Emerald Publishing

Nutritional information on restaurant menus Who cares and why restauranteurs should bother

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0959-6119
DOI
10.1108/09596110910985331
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Dining out is integral to the American lifestyle. Diners want to make informed choices. The purpose of this research is to measure consumers' need for, and attitudes toward, nutritional information (NI) on menus in full‐service restaurants. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 502 participants at a full‐service restaurant on a university campus, through a survey questionnaire. Correlations, ANOVA, and descriptive statistics were utilized for data analysis. Findings – Some market segments would dine out more often in restaurants if NI was made available. Segments concerned about NI are females, those aged 35 to 65, and those belonging to the higher income and college‐educated strata. Consumers eating healthy food at home are more likely to use NI in restaurants, as are those who dine out as a necessity. NI that consumers are most concerned about concerns fat, saturated fat, and trans‐fat. Research limitations/implications – The current study is limited by a one‐location cross‐sectional design. Future studies should be longitudinal and be conducted in multiple locations. Practical implications – A deeper understanding of consumers' concern could permit restaurateurs to use NI on menus to their competitive advantage, by effectively deploying a market segmentation strategy. Originality/value – This research adds new knowledge to the present body of hospitality literature. This paper will assist managers by providing insights into the specifics of the target markets of who needs NI, and the context in which they will use NI on menus.

Journal

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 2, 2009

Keywords: Nutrition; Information disclosure; Restaurants; Food service; Consumer behaviour

References

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