Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

NPSA infusion device toolkit: a cost‐saving way to improve patient safety

NPSA infusion device toolkit: a cost‐saving way to improve patient safety The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) has been established to reduce the risk of patient safety incidents and promote learning across the National Health Service that will improve patient safety and help organisations to learn from the experience of others. One of the first projects has been to look at the way that infusion devices are purchased, stored and used within hospitals. This work has resulted in a number of recommendations centred on simplifying the range of devices available, using a centralised system to maximise use of the equipment and ensuring that staff are properly trained. The work has also involved manufacturers in the hope that future developments in equipment design will result in more user‐friendly devices that will reduce the risk of misuse and any consequent harm to patients. NPSA has just issued its first Safer Practice Notice to Trusts to highlight the issues around infusion devices and offer NHS organisations a toolkit to help them improve patient safety and make significant cost savings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Governance: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

NPSA infusion device toolkit: a cost‐saving way to improve patient safety

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/npsa-infusion-device-toolkit-a-cost-saving-way-to-improve-patient-XpsEpeof9m
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-7274
DOI
10.1108/14777270410552215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) has been established to reduce the risk of patient safety incidents and promote learning across the National Health Service that will improve patient safety and help organisations to learn from the experience of others. One of the first projects has been to look at the way that infusion devices are purchased, stored and used within hospitals. This work has resulted in a number of recommendations centred on simplifying the range of devices available, using a centralised system to maximise use of the equipment and ensuring that staff are properly trained. The work has also involved manufacturers in the hope that future developments in equipment design will result in more user‐friendly devices that will reduce the risk of misuse and any consequent harm to patients. NPSA has just issued its first Safer Practice Notice to Trusts to highlight the issues around infusion devices and offer NHS organisations a toolkit to help them improve patient safety and make significant cost savings.

Journal

Clinical Governance: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2004

Keywords: Medical equipment; Safety; Patient care

References