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Nomenclature issues in aseptic preparation of medicines

Nomenclature issues in aseptic preparation of medicines Nomenclature is of fundamental importance in healthcare. Different professionals interpret different terms in different ways. This has implications for measurement, clinical governance, risk management and any comparative studies where clear definitions are not predetermined. A project to determine how aseptic dispensing activity in pharmacies and clinical areas should be measured found this to be the case, primarily between nurses and pharmacists. It was essential to have consistently used terms and definitions for the purposes of the project. A preliminary list was audited with senior staff in clinical areas to ascertain local views and practices. Commonly used alternatives and other relevant terms were identified. The results were validated by a multidisciplinary workshop to determine a final list. Evaluation of these and wider examples highlights the many implications and the need for the issue to be directly addressed, particularly in a multi-professional environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Clinical Governance Emerald Publishing

Nomenclature issues in aseptic preparation of medicines

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1466-4100
DOI
10.1108/14664100210446614
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nomenclature is of fundamental importance in healthcare. Different professionals interpret different terms in different ways. This has implications for measurement, clinical governance, risk management and any comparative studies where clear definitions are not predetermined. A project to determine how aseptic dispensing activity in pharmacies and clinical areas should be measured found this to be the case, primarily between nurses and pharmacists. It was essential to have consistently used terms and definitions for the purposes of the project. A preliminary list was audited with senior staff in clinical areas to ascertain local views and practices. Commonly used alternatives and other relevant terms were identified. The results were validated by a multidisciplinary workshop to determine a final list. Evaluation of these and wider examples highlights the many implications and the need for the issue to be directly addressed, particularly in a multi-professional environment.

Journal

British Journal of Clinical GovernanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: Governance; Measurement; Professionals; Audit

References