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New Zealand study shows both gender and national culture influence impact of high-performance work systems (HPWS)

New Zealand study shows both gender and national culture influence impact of high-performance... The authors based their study on the findings of attribution theory, which suggests some people attribute experiences at work to external factors, and others to internal factors. Their theory was that women and men made different attributions and this affected the impact of HPWS.Design/methodology/approachThe authors sent out a questionnaire that tested whether ability was the main factor for male performance. And it tested if the main predictor of job performance for female employees was opportunity. The authors also considered the influence of national culture. The authors collected data from a purposive sample of service sector organizations in New Zealand.FindingsAll four of their hypotheses were supported showing that ability was the main predictor for males and external factors were the main predictor for women. In addition, the study found a mediating role existed for ability for males and opportunity for females in the HPWS-job performance relationship.Originality/valueThe authors said the main contribution of the research was to show the relevance of context in studies of employees. They said the research could contribute to understanding why motivation, as an AMO element, does not feature much in studies. In addition, highlighting the role of national culture helped to explain the formation of gendered behaviour. The authors felt it was reasonable to speculate that the results were impacted by New Zealand’s national culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management International Digest Emerald Publishing

New Zealand study shows both gender and national culture influence impact of high-performance work systems (HPWS)

Human Resource Management International Digest , Volume 29 (4): 2 – Jul 5, 2021

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0967-0734
DOI
10.1108/hrmid-03-2021-0065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors based their study on the findings of attribution theory, which suggests some people attribute experiences at work to external factors, and others to internal factors. Their theory was that women and men made different attributions and this affected the impact of HPWS.Design/methodology/approachThe authors sent out a questionnaire that tested whether ability was the main factor for male performance. And it tested if the main predictor of job performance for female employees was opportunity. The authors also considered the influence of national culture. The authors collected data from a purposive sample of service sector organizations in New Zealand.FindingsAll four of their hypotheses were supported showing that ability was the main predictor for males and external factors were the main predictor for women. In addition, the study found a mediating role existed for ability for males and opportunity for females in the HPWS-job performance relationship.Originality/valueThe authors said the main contribution of the research was to show the relevance of context in studies of employees. They said the research could contribute to understanding why motivation, as an AMO element, does not feature much in studies. In addition, highlighting the role of national culture helped to explain the formation of gendered behaviour. The authors felt it was reasonable to speculate that the results were impacted by New Zealand’s national culture.

Journal

Human Resource Management International DigestEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 5, 2021

Keywords: New Zealand; Opportunity; HPWS; National Culture; Ability; AMO

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