Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

New R. A. F. Types VI

New R. A. F. Types VI June, 1941 A I R C R A F T E N G I N E E R I N G 165 H E Liberator is one of the most distinc­ tive four-engined aeroplanes yet built. I t has been designed round the Davis aerofoil, which was patente d in th e United States some years ago. This aerofoil does not appear to be unduly thin, although designed for high­ speed operation, but is claimed to provide an almost perfect co-ordination of the airflow across upper and lower surfaces. The main New R. A. F. Types plane of the Liberator is of exceedingly high aspect ratio, greater even than that of the Vickers geodetic aeroplanes, so that some special structural design must have been evolved. Extensive Fowler flaps are fitted, but VI it is not certain if the built-in slots have been retained on the British version. The layout of the aeroplane is very neat. The deep fuselage and swept-up tail are dis­ tinctive characteristics. The tail of the fuselage looks large enough for the fitting of a British power-operated turret. The nose of the fuse­ lage is shorter than is usually the case with a The American tricycle undercarriage. The large span, com­ paratively short fuselage and large " end-plate " fins are very distinctive recognition features. The engines are Prat t and Whitney eighteen- Consolidated Liberator cylinder, double-row, air-cooled radials of 1,200 h.p. Hamilton Standard Hydromatic air­ screws are fitted. Some data have been released, which point to Four-Engined Heavy th e Liberator being one of the most efficient aeroplanes of to-day. Span 110 ft. (33·5 m.) Bomber Length (54 ft. (19·5 m.) Height 19 ft. (5·8 m.) Gross weight 40,000 lb. (18,140 kg.) Bomb load (approx.) 4 tons (4,000 kg.) Range (approx.) at cruising speed ... 3,000 miles (4,825 km.) The maximum speed is quoted as being over 300 m.p.h. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

New R. A. F. Types VI

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 13 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1941

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/new-r-a-f-types-vi-6ejBC73HY9
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030787
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

June, 1941 A I R C R A F T E N G I N E E R I N G 165 H E Liberator is one of the most distinc­ tive four-engined aeroplanes yet built. I t has been designed round the Davis aerofoil, which was patente d in th e United States some years ago. This aerofoil does not appear to be unduly thin, although designed for high­ speed operation, but is claimed to provide an almost perfect co-ordination of the airflow across upper and lower surfaces. The main New R. A. F. Types plane of the Liberator is of exceedingly high aspect ratio, greater even than that of the Vickers geodetic aeroplanes, so that some special structural design must have been evolved. Extensive Fowler flaps are fitted, but VI it is not certain if the built-in slots have been retained on the British version. The layout of the aeroplane is very neat. The deep fuselage and swept-up tail are dis­ tinctive characteristics. The tail of the fuselage looks large enough for the fitting of a British power-operated turret. The nose of the fuse­ lage is shorter than is usually the case with a The American tricycle undercarriage. The large span, com­ paratively short fuselage and large " end-plate " fins are very distinctive recognition features. The engines are Prat t and Whitney eighteen- Consolidated Liberator cylinder, double-row, air-cooled radials of 1,200 h.p. Hamilton Standard Hydromatic air­ screws are fitted. Some data have been released, which point to Four-Engined Heavy th e Liberator being one of the most efficient aeroplanes of to-day. Span 110 ft. (33·5 m.) Bomber Length (54 ft. (19·5 m.) Height 19 ft. (5·8 m.) Gross weight 40,000 lb. (18,140 kg.) Bomb load (approx.) 4 tons (4,000 kg.) Range (approx.) at cruising speed ... 3,000 miles (4,825 km.) The maximum speed is quoted as being over 300 m.p.h.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1941

There are no references for this article.