New Materials

New Materials BOOKS RECEIVED New Materials All books received from Publishers are listed under this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes Brief Particulars of Recently Introduced Materials likely to have nor implies further notice in any particular instance. Aircraft, Missile or Space Vehicle Applications Metallurgy in the Service of Man. W. H. Dennis. [Macdonald. 455.] high-flying supersonic aircraft and missiles arc now Reinforced Glass Fibre in Missile Tracking Aerials Properties of Materials at Low Temperature (Phase 1) available in Britain. —A Compendium. Ed. V. J. Johnson. [Pergamon. No matter how carefully designed for purely elec­ These silicate ester fluids, known as Coolanol 45 trical functions, an aerial may be, the performance, £10.] and Coolanol 35, were developed by Monsanto both initially and continuing throughout the life of the Chemical Company, St Louis, Missouri, and will be Handbook of Automation, Computation and Control, equipment, is almost entirely dependant upon the marketed in Britain by Monsanto Chemicals Ltd., Vol. 3: Systems and Components. Ed. E. M. mechanical structure. Just how nearly the predicted who have now withdrawn their own similar product, Grabbc, S. Ramo, D. E. Wooldridgc. [John Wiley. performance is achieved is determined by the precision Montosil E, since the Coolanols have been service- 149 J. ] of manufacture and by the electrical properties of the proved in many U.S. airborne and ground applica­ constructional materials used. Consistency, accuracy Ballistic Missile and Space Vehicle Systems. Ed. H. S. tions. and reliability of performance depend on the stability Scifcrt and K. Brown, [John Wiley. 96s.] The cooling of airborne electronic equipment used, of the materials used under conditions of stress, such for example, in fire control, missile guidance and air Optimum Design of Mechanical Elements. R. C. as those due to adverse weather conditions and in the navigational systems has become an increasingly diffi­ Johnson. [John Wiley. 92s.] ability to withstand ageing and weathering without cult problem to solve as faster and higher-flying air­ either physical deformation or changes in electrical Progress in Very High Pressure Research. (Proceedings craft and missiles have been developed. properties. In addition, power losses due to absorp­ of Bolton Landing Conference, New York, 1960.) Cooling systems which were perfectly satisfactory tion in the portions of the supporting structure in the [John Wiley. 965.] ten years ago cannot now cope with the immense heat field of the aerials must be held to a minimum. This dissipated by electronic 'black boxes'. The Coolanol Shock and Vibration Handbook, Vol. 1: Basic Theory precludes the use of a metallic structure, which would fluids developed by Monsanto arc an effective answer and Measurements; Vol. 2: Data Analysis, Testing not only absorb some energy but would also alter the to the problem of heat dissipation and have been and Methods of Control; Vol. 3: Engineering radiation resistance, rendering impedance matching widely accepted for many electronic applications. Design and Environmental Conditions. Ed. C. M. difficult and still further reducing the usefully radi­ Coolanol 45, which was introduced in 1954, oper­ Harris and C. E. Crcde. [McGraw-Hill. £18 8s. ated power. ates reliably in the temperature range minus 54 to altogether.] plus 205 deg. C. Coolanol 35 was developed more re­ Jet Propulsion Fuels. N. A. Ragozin. Ed. B. P. Mul- cently for easier 'start-up' of electronic equipment at lins. [Pergamon. 55s.] extremely low temperatures. Its operating range ex­ tends well below minus 55 deg. C. Analysis of Gases in Metals. Z. M. Turovtseva and L. L. Both Coolanol 45 and 35 provide accurate tem­ Kunin. [Consultants Bureau Enterprises, 227 West perature control, excellent thermal stability, good 17th Street, New York 11, N.Y. $21.50.] pumping characteristics and good lubrication and Proceedings of the Vehicle Systems Optimization electrical properties over a wide temperature range. Symposium, 1961. [Institute of the Aerospace Both have been used simultaneously as hydraulic Sciences, 2 East 64th Street, New York 21, N.Y. fluids and electronic coolants, providing the advan­ S10 to non-members.] tages of a one-fluid system. Glass Reinforced Plastics, 3rd cdn. Ed. P. Morgan. Silicone Hydraulic Fluid [Iliffc. 505.] Because of its low inflammability and exceptional Applied Theory of Gyroscopes. B. V. Bulgakov. resistance to high temperatures without degradation, [National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C., 'Silcodyne' H, the silicone hydraulic fluid developed and The Israel Programme for Scientific Transla­ for aircraft by Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., was tions, P.O.B. 7145, Jerusalem, 705. or $10.] selected by do Havilland's as the hydraulic fluid for the Non-Linear Theory of Thin Elastic Shells. Kh. M. reheat equipment of their experimental Gyron Junior Mushtari and K.. Z. Galimov. [N.S.F. and N.A.S.A., engine with provisional approval from the Ministry Washington, D.C., and The Israel Programme for of Aviation DTD 900/4725. Scientific Translations, P.O.B. 7145, Jerusalem. A converted Glostcr Javelin powered with this engine 785. or $11.] madcitsfirst public flight appearance at Farnborough Mecaniquc Experimental des Fluides, Vol. 1: Statiquc in the autumn of 1961. Since then, many flying hours ct Dynamiquc des Fluides Non Visqucux. R. with the Gyron Junior engine have been logged and Comolet. [Masson. 38 NF.] 'Silcodyne' H, in the hydraulic system that operates sixteen petals in the variable-area nozzle of the after­ Fundamental Data Obtained from Shock-Tube Ex­ burner unit, has behaved admirably. periments. Ed. A. Fcrri. (AGARDograph 41.) In this application, the 'Silcodyne' H fluid operates [Pergamon. 845.] in very high temperature areas, because the reheat Developments in Mechanics, Vol. 1. (Proceedings of unit of the Gyron Junior engine attains a combustion Midwestern Mechanics Conference, 1961). [Plenum temperature of 2,000 deg. K. (3,140 deg. F.). How well these requirements can be met, is exempli­ Press. $21 outside U.S.A.] Thus, Silcodyne' H has helped to solve an immedi­ fied by the five new aerials supplied to the War Office Machining Characteristics of Stainless Steels. (Report ate problem for an exacting aircraft application. for use at the Trials Establishment, Guided Weapons, 56.) [Production Engineering Research Associa­ Meanwhile, longer term development work in which Royal Artillery, on the coast of Anglesey. Frequencies 'Silcodyne' H is the hydraulic fluid goes on with the tion of Great Britain, Melton Mowbray, Leics. used are in the 100, 200 and 400 Mc/s ranges and the encouragement of the Ministry of Aviation who have 105. 6d.] aerials were manufactured by Precision Reinforced awarded contracts for this work to a number of firms The World of Leonardo da Vinci. I. B. Hart. [Mac­ Mouldings Ltd., Watford, in conjunction with the in the British aircraft industry. main contractors, Cossor Radar and Electronics Ltd., donald. 45.s.] The outstanding advantages of'Silcodyne' H are its who supplied the synchronizing equipment. British Technology Index, Vol. l,No . 1, January 1962. low inflammability, chemical inertness, absence of The extremely high order of accuracy required is [The Library Association, 29 Euston Road, Lon­ corrosion, and stability within the wide temperature achieved by the use of mouldings made of glass re­ don, N.W.2. £15 155. per annum.] range of minus 65 to plus 600 deg. F. inforced resin materials. Special high grade polyester 1961 Supplement to ASTM Manuals or Engine Test resins and epoxies, together with low alkali glass, give Methods for Rating Fuels. [American Society for high mechanical strength without disturbing the Testing and Materials, 1916 Race Street, Phila­ electrical field. delphia 3, Penn., U.S.A. $4.50.] The low power factor of these materials results in a Third AFOSR Astronautics Symposium. (Vistas in high radiation efficiency. In addition, methods of Astronautics, J 960.) [Pergamon. 555.] fabrication used at Precision Reinforced Mouldings Ltd. result in the alignment accuracy being better than Aircraft Stability and Control. A. W. Babistcr. [Per­ 0·1 per cent. Due also to the natural properties of the gamon. £5 55.] materials used, the long term stability is high. Of Theory of Elastic Thin Shells. A. L. Goldcnvcizer. interest also is the fact that each of the largest aerials [Pergamon. £5 5s.] required nearly 300 separate plastic parts. The final structures arc thus good examples of the manner in Transonic Wind Tunnel Testing. B. H. Gocthcrt. which a considerable number of widely differing tech­ (AGARDograph 49.) [Pergamon. £5 55.] niques, such as extrusion, winding, dough moulding, Current Research in Astronautical Sciences. Ed. L. injection moulding, pressing and turning, can all be Broglio. [Pergamon. 845.] utilized together to produce a complicated precision Mecaniquc du Vol. P. Lecomte. [Dunod, Paris. moulding, meeting fully the designer's requirements. NF.96.] Cooling Fluids for Electronic Equipment Magncto-Fluid-Dynamics, Current Papers and Ab­ stracts. (AGARD Bibliography 1, enlarged edition.) Synthetic dielectric fluids which arc being widely [Pergamon. 705.] used in America for cooling electronic equipment in 122 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

New Materials

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 34 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1962

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb033554
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOKS RECEIVED New Materials All books received from Publishers are listed under this heading. Extended reviews of a selection appear later. Inclusion in this list, therefore, neither precludes Brief Particulars of Recently Introduced Materials likely to have nor implies further notice in any particular instance. Aircraft, Missile or Space Vehicle Applications Metallurgy in the Service of Man. W. H. Dennis. [Macdonald. 455.] high-flying supersonic aircraft and missiles arc now Reinforced Glass Fibre in Missile Tracking Aerials Properties of Materials at Low Temperature (Phase 1) available in Britain. —A Compendium. Ed. V. J. Johnson. [Pergamon. No matter how carefully designed for purely elec­ These silicate ester fluids, known as Coolanol 45 trical functions, an aerial may be, the performance, £10.] and Coolanol 35, were developed by Monsanto both initially and continuing throughout the life of the Chemical Company, St Louis, Missouri, and will be Handbook of Automation, Computation and Control, equipment, is almost entirely dependant upon the marketed in Britain by Monsanto Chemicals Ltd., Vol. 3: Systems and Components. Ed. E. M. mechanical structure. Just how nearly the predicted who have now withdrawn their own similar product, Grabbc, S. Ramo, D. E. Wooldridgc. [John Wiley. performance is achieved is determined by the precision Montosil E, since the Coolanols have been service- 149 J. ] of manufacture and by the electrical properties of the proved in many U.S. airborne and ground applica­ constructional materials used. Consistency, accuracy Ballistic Missile and Space Vehicle Systems. Ed. H. S. tions. and reliability of performance depend on the stability Scifcrt and K. Brown, [John Wiley. 96s.] The cooling of airborne electronic equipment used, of the materials used under conditions of stress, such for example, in fire control, missile guidance and air Optimum Design of Mechanical Elements. R. C. as those due to adverse weather conditions and in the navigational systems has become an increasingly diffi­ Johnson. [John Wiley. 92s.] ability to withstand ageing and weathering without cult problem to solve as faster and higher-flying air­ either physical deformation or changes in electrical Progress in Very High Pressure Research. (Proceedings craft and missiles have been developed. properties. In addition, power losses due to absorp­ of Bolton Landing Conference, New York, 1960.) Cooling systems which were perfectly satisfactory tion in the portions of the supporting structure in the [John Wiley. 965.] ten years ago cannot now cope with the immense heat field of the aerials must be held to a minimum. This dissipated by electronic 'black boxes'. The Coolanol Shock and Vibration Handbook, Vol. 1: Basic Theory precludes the use of a metallic structure, which would fluids developed by Monsanto arc an effective answer and Measurements; Vol. 2: Data Analysis, Testing not only absorb some energy but would also alter the to the problem of heat dissipation and have been and Methods of Control; Vol. 3: Engineering radiation resistance, rendering impedance matching widely accepted for many electronic applications. Design and Environmental Conditions. Ed. C. M. difficult and still further reducing the usefully radi­ Coolanol 45, which was introduced in 1954, oper­ Harris and C. E. Crcde. [McGraw-Hill. £18 8s. ated power. ates reliably in the temperature range minus 54 to altogether.] plus 205 deg. C. Coolanol 35 was developed more re­ Jet Propulsion Fuels. N. A. Ragozin. Ed. B. P. Mul- cently for easier 'start-up' of electronic equipment at lins. [Pergamon. 55s.] extremely low temperatures. Its operating range ex­ tends well below minus 55 deg. C. Analysis of Gases in Metals. Z. M. Turovtseva and L. L. Both Coolanol 45 and 35 provide accurate tem­ Kunin. [Consultants Bureau Enterprises, 227 West perature control, excellent thermal stability, good 17th Street, New York 11, N.Y. $21.50.] pumping characteristics and good lubrication and Proceedings of the Vehicle Systems Optimization electrical properties over a wide temperature range. Symposium, 1961. [Institute of the Aerospace Both have been used simultaneously as hydraulic Sciences, 2 East 64th Street, New York 21, N.Y. fluids and electronic coolants, providing the advan­ S10 to non-members.] tages of a one-fluid system. Glass Reinforced Plastics, 3rd cdn. Ed. P. Morgan. Silicone Hydraulic Fluid [Iliffc. 505.] Because of its low inflammability and exceptional Applied Theory of Gyroscopes. B. V. Bulgakov. resistance to high temperatures without degradation, [National Science Foundation, Washington, D.C., 'Silcodyne' H, the silicone hydraulic fluid developed and The Israel Programme for Scientific Transla­ for aircraft by Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd., was tions, P.O.B. 7145, Jerusalem, 705. or $10.] selected by do Havilland's as the hydraulic fluid for the Non-Linear Theory of Thin Elastic Shells. Kh. M. reheat equipment of their experimental Gyron Junior Mushtari and K.. Z. Galimov. [N.S.F. and N.A.S.A., engine with provisional approval from the Ministry Washington, D.C., and The Israel Programme for of Aviation DTD 900/4725. Scientific Translations, P.O.B. 7145, Jerusalem. A converted Glostcr Javelin powered with this engine 785. or $11.] madcitsfirst public flight appearance at Farnborough Mecaniquc Experimental des Fluides, Vol. 1: Statiquc in the autumn of 1961. Since then, many flying hours ct Dynamiquc des Fluides Non Visqucux. R. with the Gyron Junior engine have been logged and Comolet. [Masson. 38 NF.] 'Silcodyne' H, in the hydraulic system that operates sixteen petals in the variable-area nozzle of the after­ Fundamental Data Obtained from Shock-Tube Ex­ burner unit, has behaved admirably. periments. Ed. A. Fcrri. (AGARDograph 41.) In this application, the 'Silcodyne' H fluid operates [Pergamon. 845.] in very high temperature areas, because the reheat Developments in Mechanics, Vol. 1. (Proceedings of unit of the Gyron Junior engine attains a combustion Midwestern Mechanics Conference, 1961). [Plenum temperature of 2,000 deg. K. (3,140 deg. F.). How well these requirements can be met, is exempli­ Press. $21 outside U.S.A.] Thus, Silcodyne' H has helped to solve an immedi­ fied by the five new aerials supplied to the War Office Machining Characteristics of Stainless Steels. (Report ate problem for an exacting aircraft application. for use at the Trials Establishment, Guided Weapons, 56.) [Production Engineering Research Associa­ Meanwhile, longer term development work in which Royal Artillery, on the coast of Anglesey. Frequencies 'Silcodyne' H is the hydraulic fluid goes on with the tion of Great Britain, Melton Mowbray, Leics. used are in the 100, 200 and 400 Mc/s ranges and the encouragement of the Ministry of Aviation who have 105. 6d.] aerials were manufactured by Precision Reinforced awarded contracts for this work to a number of firms The World of Leonardo da Vinci. I. B. Hart. [Mac­ Mouldings Ltd., Watford, in conjunction with the in the British aircraft industry. main contractors, Cossor Radar and Electronics Ltd., donald. 45.s.] The outstanding advantages of'Silcodyne' H are its who supplied the synchronizing equipment. British Technology Index, Vol. l,No . 1, January 1962. low inflammability, chemical inertness, absence of The extremely high order of accuracy required is [The Library Association, 29 Euston Road, Lon­ corrosion, and stability within the wide temperature achieved by the use of mouldings made of glass re­ don, N.W.2. £15 155. per annum.] range of minus 65 to plus 600 deg. F. inforced resin materials. Special high grade polyester 1961 Supplement to ASTM Manuals or Engine Test resins and epoxies, together with low alkali glass, give Methods for Rating Fuels. [American Society for high mechanical strength without disturbing the Testing and Materials, 1916 Race Street, Phila­ electrical field. delphia 3, Penn., U.S.A. $4.50.] The low power factor of these materials results in a Third AFOSR Astronautics Symposium. (Vistas in high radiation efficiency. In addition, methods of Astronautics, J 960.) [Pergamon. 555.] fabrication used at Precision Reinforced Mouldings Ltd. result in the alignment accuracy being better than Aircraft Stability and Control. A. W. Babistcr. [Per­ 0·1 per cent. Due also to the natural properties of the gamon. £5 55.] materials used, the long term stability is high. Of Theory of Elastic Thin Shells. A. L. Goldcnvcizer. interest also is the fact that each of the largest aerials [Pergamon. £5 5s.] required nearly 300 separate plastic parts. The final structures arc thus good examples of the manner in Transonic Wind Tunnel Testing. B. H. Gocthcrt. which a considerable number of widely differing tech­ (AGARDograph 49.) [Pergamon. £5 55.] niques, such as extrusion, winding, dough moulding, Current Research in Astronautical Sciences. Ed. L. injection moulding, pressing and turning, can all be Broglio. [Pergamon. 845.] utilized together to produce a complicated precision Mecaniquc du Vol. P. Lecomte. [Dunod, Paris. moulding, meeting fully the designer's requirements. NF.96.] Cooling Fluids for Electronic Equipment Magncto-Fluid-Dynamics, Current Papers and Ab­ stracts. (AGARD Bibliography 1, enlarged edition.) Synthetic dielectric fluids which arc being widely [Pergamon. 705.] used in America for cooling electronic equipment in 122 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1962

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