Negotiating the benefits of knowledge

Negotiating the benefits of knowledge Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of tensions between the benefits such as technologies and skills and the substance of knowledge often described as pure inquiry in Australian universities. There are advantages to considering this debate in Australia, since its universities were tightly connected to scholarly networks in the British Empire. After the Second World War, those ties were loosened, enabling influences from American research and technological universities, augmented by a growing connection between universities, government economic strategy and the procedures of industry. This paper thus traces some of routes by which arguments travelled and the ways they were articulated in postwar Australia.Designmethodologyapproach Ideas do not travel on their own. In this paper, the author takes a biographical approach to the question of contrasting attitudes to university knowledge in the postwar period, comparing the international scholarly and professional networks of two British scientists who travelled to Australia contemporaries in age and education both influencing Australian higher education policy in diametrically opposing ways.Findings This research demonstrates that the growing connection with economic goals in Australian universities after the Second World War was in part a result of the new international and crosssectoral networks in which some scholars now operated.Originalityvalue Australian historiography suggests that shifts in the emphases of postwar universities were primarily the consequence of government policy. This paper demonstrates that the debates that shaped Australia's modern university system were also conducted among an international network of scholars. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Negotiating the benefits of knowledge

History of Education Review, Volume 42 (1): 16 – Jun 21, 2013

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691311317679
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of tensions between the benefits such as technologies and skills and the substance of knowledge often described as pure inquiry in Australian universities. There are advantages to considering this debate in Australia, since its universities were tightly connected to scholarly networks in the British Empire. After the Second World War, those ties were loosened, enabling influences from American research and technological universities, augmented by a growing connection between universities, government economic strategy and the procedures of industry. This paper thus traces some of routes by which arguments travelled and the ways they were articulated in postwar Australia.Designmethodologyapproach Ideas do not travel on their own. In this paper, the author takes a biographical approach to the question of contrasting attitudes to university knowledge in the postwar period, comparing the international scholarly and professional networks of two British scientists who travelled to Australia contemporaries in age and education both influencing Australian higher education policy in diametrically opposing ways.Findings This research demonstrates that the growing connection with economic goals in Australian universities after the Second World War was in part a result of the new international and crosssectoral networks in which some scholars now operated.Originalityvalue Australian historiography suggests that shifts in the emphases of postwar universities were primarily the consequence of government policy. This paper demonstrates that the debates that shaped Australia's modern university system were also conducted among an international network of scholars.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 21, 2013

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