Nasties in the Net: children and censorship on the Web

Nasties in the Net: children and censorship on the Web Focuses specifically on children's experiences of the Internet, including the extent of their exposure to sexual, racial or other unpleasant material, how teachers view this problem, and what action schools are taking. The questionnaire survey found a higher number of children with Internet access at home than previous studies; this was regardless of the socio-economic group. Figures of those who had seen unpleasant or offensive material were also higher than previous research has shown. Teachers' views were also canvassed. Many staff were unaware of their schools' Internet use policies, and had little or no training in using the Internet with children. The study concludes that more needs to be done to both meet government online targets and to address the issue of free Internet use with children's protection. Suggestions regarding the role of librarians are offered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png New Library World Emerald Publishing

Nasties in the Net: children and censorship on the Web

New Library World, Volume 103 (1/2): 9 – Feb 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/nasties-in-the-net-children-and-censorship-on-the-web-QN4gmGqzsk
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0307-4803
DOI
10.1108/03074800210415041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Focuses specifically on children's experiences of the Internet, including the extent of their exposure to sexual, racial or other unpleasant material, how teachers view this problem, and what action schools are taking. The questionnaire survey found a higher number of children with Internet access at home than previous studies; this was regardless of the socio-economic group. Figures of those who had seen unpleasant or offensive material were also higher than previous research has shown. Teachers' views were also canvassed. Many staff were unaware of their schools' Internet use policies, and had little or no training in using the Internet with children. The study concludes that more needs to be done to both meet government online targets and to address the issue of free Internet use with children's protection. Suggestions regarding the role of librarians are offered.

Journal

New Library WorldEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 2002

Keywords: Children; Schools; Censorship; United Kingdom; Librarians

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month