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Multiple sclerosis: long‐term social care and the ‘family care pathway’

Multiple sclerosis: long‐term social care and the ‘family care pathway’ Neurological disease and neurodisability cause significant disruption to families, who come under substantial pressure to adapt to changes in the condition over time. Family members are often disadvantaged in their coping because of infrequent access to professional consultations, and by default carers tend to neglect their own needs. One threat to relationships can be a pull towards acting as the main carer, even carrying out personal care tasks, especially if the family unit resists extending its boundaries to include paid carers. We discuss the distinct challenges that families are faced with at different stages of disease progression (emerging, diagnostic, longterm adaptation, crisis, chronic, and terminal) for one particular condition (multiple sclerosis or MS). A number of recommendations are made for supporting family members in the form of a ‘family care pathway’ for neurology and neurodisability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

Multiple sclerosis: long‐term social care and the ‘family care pathway’

Social Care and Neurodisability , Volume 1 (1): 8 – Apr 28, 2010

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.5042/scn.2010.0206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Neurological disease and neurodisability cause significant disruption to families, who come under substantial pressure to adapt to changes in the condition over time. Family members are often disadvantaged in their coping because of infrequent access to professional consultations, and by default carers tend to neglect their own needs. One threat to relationships can be a pull towards acting as the main carer, even carrying out personal care tasks, especially if the family unit resists extending its boundaries to include paid carers. We discuss the distinct challenges that families are faced with at different stages of disease progression (emerging, diagnostic, longterm adaptation, crisis, chronic, and terminal) for one particular condition (multiple sclerosis or MS). A number of recommendations are made for supporting family members in the form of a ‘family care pathway’ for neurology and neurodisability.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 28, 2010

Keywords: Multiple sclerosis; Neurodisability; Carers; Social care; Family members; Support

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