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Multi-agency gold incident command training for civil emergencies

Multi-agency gold incident command training for civil emergencies Purpose – The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it will trace, for the first time, the historical events which have progressively influenced emergency training. Second, it will evaluate the design considerations and delivery of strategic training to participants attending a multi-agency gold incident command programme. Finally, it will make recommendations about the suitability of training approaches for different aspects of emergency training. Design/methodology/approach – This research used a mixed methods study design involving a longitudinal literature review of disasters which influenced training; and a case study of multi-agency training. Findings – Guidance for major incidents developed in a relatively ad hoc manner until consolidated by the Civil Contingencies Act (2004). In addition, health and safety considerations prevent on-the-job training during major incidents. Furthermore, different forms of training would appear to be more suited to training for the different stages of a major incident. Research limitations/implications – The European Union delegates responsibility for emergency planning to individual nations. Although the findings relate to this UK case study the lessons learned would appear to be generic and may be applicable in other countries. Practical implications – Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident. Social implications – Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident. Originality/value – This is the first paper charting the historical development of emergency training. There is a limited base of literature for emergency training. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disaster Prevention and Management Emerald Publishing

Multi-agency gold incident command training for civil emergencies

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References (22)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0965-3562
DOI
10.1108/DPM-11-2013-0212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it will trace, for the first time, the historical events which have progressively influenced emergency training. Second, it will evaluate the design considerations and delivery of strategic training to participants attending a multi-agency gold incident command programme. Finally, it will make recommendations about the suitability of training approaches for different aspects of emergency training. Design/methodology/approach – This research used a mixed methods study design involving a longitudinal literature review of disasters which influenced training; and a case study of multi-agency training. Findings – Guidance for major incidents developed in a relatively ad hoc manner until consolidated by the Civil Contingencies Act (2004). In addition, health and safety considerations prevent on-the-job training during major incidents. Furthermore, different forms of training would appear to be more suited to training for the different stages of a major incident. Research limitations/implications – The European Union delegates responsibility for emergency planning to individual nations. Although the findings relate to this UK case study the lessons learned would appear to be generic and may be applicable in other countries. Practical implications – Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident. Social implications – Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident. Originality/value – This is the first paper charting the historical development of emergency training. There is a limited base of literature for emergency training.

Journal

Disaster Prevention and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 28, 2014

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