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Mother-teacher-scholar-advocates: narrating work-life on the professorial plateau

Mother-teacher-scholar-advocates: narrating work-life on the professorial plateau In this study, two mother-scholars describe their lived experiences working in higher education in the USA while parenting children with disabilities. They situate their narratives within the context of institutionalized motherhood, courtesy stigma and the career plateau experienced by many working mothers of children with disabilities.Design/methodology/approachWithin this collaborative autoethnography, the authors employ autoethnographic narrative and poetic inquiry.FindingsThe authors reveal unique work-life tensions that they have experienced as mothers, teachers and scholars, reflecting on the experiences that led them to become advocates for people and families with disabilities.Practical implicationsThe authors aim to reduce stigma and to disrupt the career plateau by offering suggestions to help coworkers and supervisors be more supportive of working parents of children with disabilities.Originality/valueThe authors enumerate the advantages of collaborative autoethnography in uncovering how stigma against mothers of children with disabilities is manifested within an academic community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Ethnography Emerald Publishing

Mother-teacher-scholar-advocates: narrating work-life on the professorial plateau

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References (26)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2046-6749
DOI
10.1108/joe-07-2020-0026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this study, two mother-scholars describe their lived experiences working in higher education in the USA while parenting children with disabilities. They situate their narratives within the context of institutionalized motherhood, courtesy stigma and the career plateau experienced by many working mothers of children with disabilities.Design/methodology/approachWithin this collaborative autoethnography, the authors employ autoethnographic narrative and poetic inquiry.FindingsThe authors reveal unique work-life tensions that they have experienced as mothers, teachers and scholars, reflecting on the experiences that led them to become advocates for people and families with disabilities.Practical implicationsThe authors aim to reduce stigma and to disrupt the career plateau by offering suggestions to help coworkers and supervisors be more supportive of working parents of children with disabilities.Originality/valueThe authors enumerate the advantages of collaborative autoethnography in uncovering how stigma against mothers of children with disabilities is manifested within an academic community.

Journal

Journal of Organizational EthnographyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 29, 2021

Keywords: Parents of children with disabilities; Higher education; Institutionalized motherhood; Courtesy stigma; Work-life tension; Career plateau; Collaborative autoethnography

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