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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, price 3S. each. 731,413. Convertible aircraft. Goodyear Aircraft Corpn., U.S.A. Application November 25, 1953. An aircraft capable of horizontal flight as an aerc- plane, and of vertical take off and descent, as well as hovering, in the manner of a helicopter, consists of an aerofoil-shaped body 1 of approximately elliptical plan form, having the major axis disposed trans­ versely and with a well portion 8 in which are mounted variable-pitch contra-propellers 7 driven by an engine 6, the flow of air through the well being controlled by louvres 10, 11 on the upper and lower surfaces respectively of the body 1. The axis of the propellers is tilted forwardly at a small angle and transverse guide vanes 65 direct air from an inlet 9 into the propellers. When in horizontal flight the louvres 10, 11 are closed and the propellers force the air rear- wardly, while for vertical flight the louvres are opened so that the airflow through the body is substantially vertical. In addition to the normal control surfaces, rudder 13, elevators 16 and ailerons 17, the pitches of the propellers are capable of comparison with the chord, is made by deforming in differential adjustment to produce an unbalanced a sink die an extruded section of the shape shown in rotor torque to assist the rudder. When operating as a FIG 3b. The portion of this member extending from helicopter additional control is provided by two pairs the leading edge 24 to the portion 30 in the rear of the of diametrically disposed segmental sliding covers webs 26, 28 is of the same shape as the finished blade, 18, 19 which can be operated to close parts of the but the upper and lower portions extending from the opening formed by the lower louvres 11. region 30 to the tip of the trailing edge are bulged outwardly at 34, 36 to reduce the chord length. The thickness of the bulged portions is the same as that 731,515. Reinforced concrete fuselages. Louis of the blade, and the periphery of these portions is Breguet, France. Application December 7, 1953. also equal to that of the final blade, so that during its passage through the die to flatten the bulges the A reinforced concrete hollow cylindrical member, metal is not subjected to any substantial extruding such as a circular-section fuselage 1, comprises main action, but is only bent to the final shape, the general longitudinal pre-tensioned reinforcing members 2 and progress of the blank being indicated by the lines on secondary reinforcing rings 3 which provide a number FIG. 3ft which show the paths taken by points on the exterior surface. 732,617. Wings. K. M. and R. A. Turton, London. Application in Austria, July 9, 1952. A wing is formed on its lower and upper surfaces with a series of transverse slots 11,12 interconnected by C-shaped ducts 14 which are divided, to form a number of flow paths, by longitudinally disposed partitions 13 which are inclined outwardly from the lower wing surface. The partitions may be spaced at equal intervals transversely of the wing and arranged at the same inclination but preferably, as shown in FIG. 4b, the spacing and inclination both increase towards the wing tips. In the case of a swept-back wing, FIG. 4c, the partitions diverge from the leading edge 16 towards the trailing edge 17, but if the wing is non-swept they may be arranged parallel to the of supporting points for the members 2 and are auto­ longitudinal axis. The construction increases the anti- matically tensioned by the tensioning of the latter. The roll effect since the partitions of the depressed wing mould consists of a core 10 with a scries of air will be more nearly horizontal and thus the load due chambers 12 located between the core and a number to the air impinging on them will be more nearly of outer sectors 13. Rings 11 mounted on the sectors vertical, whereas the loads on the partitions of the 13 each carry a series of radial rods 6 for holding the raised wing will be more nearly horizontal. rings 3 in position. One end of each of the longi­ tudinal rods 2 is attached to a ring 18 intended to form an integral part of the fuselage, the other end being secured to the flange 16 of a cover 14. The latter is moved axially to tension the rods 2 by a scries of jacks 15, after which concrete is poured into the mould and vibrated, and the air chambers 12 are then inflated. When the concrete has set the chambers 12 are deflated and the supporting pins 6 withdrawn simultaneously by the operation, through an axial rod, of a series of bell cranks 31 to which they are attached, to enable the core to be withdrawn. 731,573. Propeller blades. Jacobs Aircraft Engine Co., U.S.A. Application June 1, 1953. A blade of a helicopter rotor or screw propeller of the section shown in riG. 3a, in which the thickness of the trailing edge portions 2, 12 is very small in January 1956 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 28 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1956

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032655
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, price 3S. each. 731,413. Convertible aircraft. Goodyear Aircraft Corpn., U.S.A. Application November 25, 1953. An aircraft capable of horizontal flight as an aerc- plane, and of vertical take off and descent, as well as hovering, in the manner of a helicopter, consists of an aerofoil-shaped body 1 of approximately elliptical plan form, having the major axis disposed trans­ versely and with a well portion 8 in which are mounted variable-pitch contra-propellers 7 driven by an engine 6, the flow of air through the well being controlled by louvres 10, 11 on the upper and lower surfaces respectively of the body 1. The axis of the propellers is tilted forwardly at a small angle and transverse guide vanes 65 direct air from an inlet 9 into the propellers. When in horizontal flight the louvres 10, 11 are closed and the propellers force the air rear- wardly, while for vertical flight the louvres are opened so that the airflow through the body is substantially vertical. In addition to the normal control surfaces, rudder 13, elevators 16 and ailerons 17, the pitches of the propellers are capable of comparison with the chord, is made by deforming in differential adjustment to produce an unbalanced a sink die an extruded section of the shape shown in rotor torque to assist the rudder. When operating as a FIG 3b. The portion of this member extending from helicopter additional control is provided by two pairs the leading edge 24 to the portion 30 in the rear of the of diametrically disposed segmental sliding covers webs 26, 28 is of the same shape as the finished blade, 18, 19 which can be operated to close parts of the but the upper and lower portions extending from the opening formed by the lower louvres 11. region 30 to the tip of the trailing edge are bulged outwardly at 34, 36 to reduce the chord length. The thickness of the bulged portions is the same as that 731,515. Reinforced concrete fuselages. Louis of the blade, and the periphery of these portions is Breguet, France. Application December 7, 1953. also equal to that of the final blade, so that during its passage through the die to flatten the bulges the A reinforced concrete hollow cylindrical member, metal is not subjected to any substantial extruding such as a circular-section fuselage 1, comprises main action, but is only bent to the final shape, the general longitudinal pre-tensioned reinforcing members 2 and progress of the blank being indicated by the lines on secondary reinforcing rings 3 which provide a number FIG. 3ft which show the paths taken by points on the exterior surface. 732,617. Wings. K. M. and R. A. Turton, London. Application in Austria, July 9, 1952. A wing is formed on its lower and upper surfaces with a series of transverse slots 11,12 interconnected by C-shaped ducts 14 which are divided, to form a number of flow paths, by longitudinally disposed partitions 13 which are inclined outwardly from the lower wing surface. The partitions may be spaced at equal intervals transversely of the wing and arranged at the same inclination but preferably, as shown in FIG. 4b, the spacing and inclination both increase towards the wing tips. In the case of a swept-back wing, FIG. 4c, the partitions diverge from the leading edge 16 towards the trailing edge 17, but if the wing is non-swept they may be arranged parallel to the of supporting points for the members 2 and are auto­ longitudinal axis. The construction increases the anti- matically tensioned by the tensioning of the latter. The roll effect since the partitions of the depressed wing mould consists of a core 10 with a scries of air will be more nearly horizontal and thus the load due chambers 12 located between the core and a number to the air impinging on them will be more nearly of outer sectors 13. Rings 11 mounted on the sectors vertical, whereas the loads on the partitions of the 13 each carry a series of radial rods 6 for holding the raised wing will be more nearly horizontal. rings 3 in position. One end of each of the longi­ tudinal rods 2 is attached to a ring 18 intended to form an integral part of the fuselage, the other end being secured to the flange 16 of a cover 14. The latter is moved axially to tension the rods 2 by a scries of jacks 15, after which concrete is poured into the mould and vibrated, and the air chambers 12 are then inflated. When the concrete has set the chambers 12 are deflated and the supporting pins 6 withdrawn simultaneously by the operation, through an axial rod, of a series of bell cranks 31 to which they are attached, to enable the core to be withdrawn. 731,573. Propeller blades. Jacobs Aircraft Engine Co., U.S.A. Application June 1, 1953. A blade of a helicopter rotor or screw propeller of the section shown in riG. 3a, in which the thickness of the trailing edge portions 2, 12 is very small in January 1956

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1956

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