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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 24 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING January, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 371,093 . Regulating. Rowledge, A. J., th e figure or alternatively t o a square section and opposed complemental members joined in the plane Ellerslie, Trowels Lane, and Rubbra, A. A., Red riveted on the trailing edge. Alternatively, the of symmetry of the boom, the inner boom members Roofs, Carlton Road, bot h in Derby . Feb. 20, 1931, edges on the trimmed-off portion are pressed to­ havin g substantially flat and relatively wide No . 5392. [Class 7 (vi).] gethe r and rivets are passed through filling-in angularl y related or opposed faces, has th e branches pieces which preserve the run of the blade. The of the channel web members extended to overlap I n means lor over-riding an automatic altitude root is either left plain, or swaged up, or has a th e faces of the inner boom members to which they control, the connection between the blower outlet riveted-on flanged, thick-walled socket. ar e secured. All the parts are made from stainless steel strip. In one form the halves of each boom ar e shaped to form two semi-hexagonal sections 16, 372,324 . Aircraft structures. Budd Manu­ 17, Fig. 2, joined by a flat portion 18 and having facturin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, flanges 19, 20. The two halves are joined by weld­ Philadelphia, U.S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, E. J. ing a t the parts 18, 19, 20. The web members 12, W. ; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Pennsylvania, Fig . 1, are arranged in Warren girder formation U.S.A.) Oct. 28, 1930, No. 32343. Convention date, an d are of channel section, th e side walls an d bottom Jun e 5. [Class 4.] of the channel are extended at each end and bent t o form tab s 26, 27, 28 for welding t o th e faces of the Th e channelled chord elements 10, 11 of a wing half-hexagonal sections of the inner chord members ri b structure of an aeroplane are formed with whic h are secured thereto before securing th e outer flattened portions 13, which are spot welded to members . Channels 30, Fig. 4, and flanges 29 may trusse s 12. Cover sheets 16 wit h channel ribs 17, be formed on the webs an d the channel section may Fig . 3, a t one end are spot welded to each other at be closed by welding on strips 31 . 19, 20 and to annular frames 15 of a fuselage body structur e at 18. The parts of the structure are composed of stainless steel, preferably an austenitic, 373,410 . Cooling cylinders. Gloster Aircraft ai r hardening non-magnetic steel, such as a steel Co., Ltd. and Duncanson, F., Gloster Works & containin g from 6 to 12 per cent of nickel and Aerodrome, Ltd., Hucclecote, Gloucestershire. May 16 to 20 per cent of chromium, preferably 8 per 23 , 1931, No. 15286. [Class 7 (ii).] cen t of nickel and 18 per cent of chromium. I n an evaporative cooling system for aircraft engines, th e condenser is disposed in a streamlined ga p extending from the upper to the lower surface of th e wing along a portion of its length between independentl y formed fore-and-aft aerofoil sections. Th e system is shown in Fig. 1 wit h th e condenser 8 arranged in a gap between aerofoils 17, 18. The an d the pressure-responsive device is provided with cooling system comprises a pump 6, a steam a leak or pressure-relieving device operated by the separato r tank 7, the condenser 8 and a hot-well pilot moving his throttle control beyond a stop, tan k 9. Water condensed in tank 7 returns to the gate , or like obstruction. The figure shows the pum p through pipe 11 an d the steam passes to the throttl e valve f6 connected to a floating lever f1 condenser through pipe 12, enterin g the condenser actuate d by the pilot's control f3 and by a relay 8 by a header 20. The condensate is drained from device d2, the controlling valve b of which is con­ a receiving channel 21 by pipe 13 to hot-well 9. nected to a pressure-responsive device a supplied Wate r from the hot-well 9 is pumped back to the wit h blower pressure through a pipe g. This pipe separato r tank 7 through pipes 15, 16. A vent is is connecte d t o a branc h g2 leadin g t o th e atmosphere fitted at 14. The condenser is built up from spaced a t g3 and controlled by a valve g6, which is opened flattened tubes 19 arranged to fill the gap in the b y th e pilot's throttl e control f3 when this is moved wing as shown. The tubes are connected to the beyon d the stop, &c. A restriction g1 in the pipe g heade r 20 and receiving channel 21 at front and prevent s damage due to back-fires, and an adjust­ rea r respectively. An auxiliary radiator 22 of the 373,188 . Aircraft structure. Budd Manu­ abl e restriction g4 is also provided in th e branch g2. two-skin type may be fitted on the leading edge; facturin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, A valve b2, connected to the valve g6, may be th e skins may be corrugated as shown as 23 in Philadelphia, U..S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, provided as described in Specification 348,868 for Fig . 1 or Fig. 3. This condenser communicates E . J. W.; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Penn­ substitutin g atmospheric pressure for blower-outlet wit h condenser 8 throug h the pipe 26 in which is a sylvania , U.S.A.) Feb. 13, 1931, No. 4572. Con­ pressur e in th e relay device. Specifications 351,117 double-acting relief valve 25 which permits steam ventio n date, Feb. 13, 1930. [Class 4.] an d 356,619 also are referred to. t o escape from condenser 8 if the pressure is high an d allows ai r t o enter it if th e pressure drops below atmospheric . Condensate from condenser 22 is 371,499 . Screw propellers . Armstrong Whit- returne d through pipe 27, which is heated by wort h Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., an d Wylie, H. N., proximit y to pipe 12, t o the hot-well tank 9. A Whitley , near Coventry. Feb. 4, 1931, No. 3551. streamlin e pipe 28 connects the lowest point of [Class 114.] condenser 8 to pipe 27, serving as a drain when the wings are at a low angle of incidence. Pipe 28 A single blade for a propeller formed from a communicate s with each tube 19 by a very small meta l tube of uniform outside or inside diameter, hole but a restriction washer is also placed at 29 to i n general with a tapering wall thickness, is pressed preven t a large volume of steam from blowing to directl y to aerofoil section with a straight leading th e hot-well tank 9. A similar washer may be edge 9. The ti p is then trimmed off as shown in arrange d in pipe 13. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of 1I.M, Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 , Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s.per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address A n aircraft spar or similar member of the type price 1s. each. comprising booms interconnected by web members Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ of channel section, each boom being built from panied by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 5 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1933

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029649
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

24 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING January, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 371,093 . Regulating. Rowledge, A. J., th e figure or alternatively t o a square section and opposed complemental members joined in the plane Ellerslie, Trowels Lane, and Rubbra, A. A., Red riveted on the trailing edge. Alternatively, the of symmetry of the boom, the inner boom members Roofs, Carlton Road, bot h in Derby . Feb. 20, 1931, edges on the trimmed-off portion are pressed to­ havin g substantially flat and relatively wide No . 5392. [Class 7 (vi).] gethe r and rivets are passed through filling-in angularl y related or opposed faces, has th e branches pieces which preserve the run of the blade. The of the channel web members extended to overlap I n means lor over-riding an automatic altitude root is either left plain, or swaged up, or has a th e faces of the inner boom members to which they control, the connection between the blower outlet riveted-on flanged, thick-walled socket. ar e secured. All the parts are made from stainless steel strip. In one form the halves of each boom ar e shaped to form two semi-hexagonal sections 16, 372,324 . Aircraft structures. Budd Manu­ 17, Fig. 2, joined by a flat portion 18 and having facturin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, flanges 19, 20. The two halves are joined by weld­ Philadelphia, U.S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, E. J. ing a t the parts 18, 19, 20. The web members 12, W. ; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Pennsylvania, Fig . 1, are arranged in Warren girder formation U.S.A.) Oct. 28, 1930, No. 32343. Convention date, an d are of channel section, th e side walls an d bottom Jun e 5. [Class 4.] of the channel are extended at each end and bent t o form tab s 26, 27, 28 for welding t o th e faces of the Th e channelled chord elements 10, 11 of a wing half-hexagonal sections of the inner chord members ri b structure of an aeroplane are formed with whic h are secured thereto before securing th e outer flattened portions 13, which are spot welded to members . Channels 30, Fig. 4, and flanges 29 may trusse s 12. Cover sheets 16 wit h channel ribs 17, be formed on the webs an d the channel section may Fig . 3, a t one end are spot welded to each other at be closed by welding on strips 31 . 19, 20 and to annular frames 15 of a fuselage body structur e at 18. The parts of the structure are composed of stainless steel, preferably an austenitic, 373,410 . Cooling cylinders. Gloster Aircraft ai r hardening non-magnetic steel, such as a steel Co., Ltd. and Duncanson, F., Gloster Works & containin g from 6 to 12 per cent of nickel and Aerodrome, Ltd., Hucclecote, Gloucestershire. May 16 to 20 per cent of chromium, preferably 8 per 23 , 1931, No. 15286. [Class 7 (ii).] cen t of nickel and 18 per cent of chromium. I n an evaporative cooling system for aircraft engines, th e condenser is disposed in a streamlined ga p extending from the upper to the lower surface of th e wing along a portion of its length between independentl y formed fore-and-aft aerofoil sections. Th e system is shown in Fig. 1 wit h th e condenser 8 arranged in a gap between aerofoils 17, 18. The an d the pressure-responsive device is provided with cooling system comprises a pump 6, a steam a leak or pressure-relieving device operated by the separato r tank 7, the condenser 8 and a hot-well pilot moving his throttle control beyond a stop, tan k 9. Water condensed in tank 7 returns to the gate , or like obstruction. The figure shows the pum p through pipe 11 an d the steam passes to the throttl e valve f6 connected to a floating lever f1 condenser through pipe 12, enterin g the condenser actuate d by the pilot's control f3 and by a relay 8 by a header 20. The condensate is drained from device d2, the controlling valve b of which is con­ a receiving channel 21 by pipe 13 to hot-well 9. nected to a pressure-responsive device a supplied Wate r from the hot-well 9 is pumped back to the wit h blower pressure through a pipe g. This pipe separato r tank 7 through pipes 15, 16. A vent is is connecte d t o a branc h g2 leadin g t o th e atmosphere fitted at 14. The condenser is built up from spaced a t g3 and controlled by a valve g6, which is opened flattened tubes 19 arranged to fill the gap in the b y th e pilot's throttl e control f3 when this is moved wing as shown. The tubes are connected to the beyon d the stop, &c. A restriction g1 in the pipe g heade r 20 and receiving channel 21 at front and prevent s damage due to back-fires, and an adjust­ rea r respectively. An auxiliary radiator 22 of the 373,188 . Aircraft structure. Budd Manu­ abl e restriction g4 is also provided in th e branch g2. two-skin type may be fitted on the leading edge; facturin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, A valve b2, connected to the valve g6, may be th e skins may be corrugated as shown as 23 in Philadelphia, U..S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, provided as described in Specification 348,868 for Fig . 1 or Fig. 3. This condenser communicates E . J. W.; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Penn­ substitutin g atmospheric pressure for blower-outlet wit h condenser 8 throug h the pipe 26 in which is a sylvania , U.S.A.) Feb. 13, 1931, No. 4572. Con­ pressur e in th e relay device. Specifications 351,117 double-acting relief valve 25 which permits steam ventio n date, Feb. 13, 1930. [Class 4.] an d 356,619 also are referred to. t o escape from condenser 8 if the pressure is high an d allows ai r t o enter it if th e pressure drops below atmospheric . Condensate from condenser 22 is 371,499 . Screw propellers . Armstrong Whit- returne d through pipe 27, which is heated by wort h Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., an d Wylie, H. N., proximit y to pipe 12, t o the hot-well tank 9. A Whitley , near Coventry. Feb. 4, 1931, No. 3551. streamlin e pipe 28 connects the lowest point of [Class 114.] condenser 8 to pipe 27, serving as a drain when the wings are at a low angle of incidence. Pipe 28 A single blade for a propeller formed from a communicate s with each tube 19 by a very small meta l tube of uniform outside or inside diameter, hole but a restriction washer is also placed at 29 to i n general with a tapering wall thickness, is pressed preven t a large volume of steam from blowing to directl y to aerofoil section with a straight leading th e hot-well tank 9. A similar washer may be edge 9. The ti p is then trimmed off as shown in arrange d in pipe 13. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of 1I.M, Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 , Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s.per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address A n aircraft spar or similar member of the type price 1s. each. comprising booms interconnected by web members Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ of channel section, each boom being built from panied by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1933

There are no references for this article.