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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 246 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 390,201 . Tail-less aeroplanes . Lippisch, A., ma y be omitted or Fliegerlager-Wasserkuppe, Post Gersfeld, Germany. th e inner member 6 Sept. 30, 1931. No . 27242. [Class 4.] ma y be asymetrical; for instance, of dia­ An aerofoil for arrow-shaped tail-less aircraft mond shape and be has a section which varies over the span from a connected to member 7 stabl e section at the root being merged gradually by Warren girder cross into sections having an inverse centre of pressure bracing . Transverse movemen t whereby the aerofoil has a substantially frames according to any constan t centre of pressure permitting th e employ­ of these modifications men t of a single spar. The aerofoil may be formed ma y be used in com­ with a continuous small slot between a large fore binatio n in one fuse­ par t and a small rear part, and this rear part may lage. The longitudinal be pivoted to form a control surface. Fig. 1 shows member s 10 are of an aerofoil of the above-described type in which a angle section and are 389,035 . Aircraft framework. A.T.S. Co., mai n par t 1 wit h a reflexly curved median line 7, 8, secured by gussets 11 Ltd. , 5, Clements Inn , Strand, London, and North, Fig . 2, is merged into a symmetrical section 12, riveted at the points J. D., Hill House, Katon Hill, Norwich. Oct. 17, Fig . 3, an d finally into a reversed aerofoil section 17, 12 to frame 5. The 1932, No. 28934. [Class 4.] Fig . 4. The small aerofoils 4, 13, formed by the gussets are cut away division of the main aerofoil into two parts by an Tubula r aircraft members have their ends shaped a t 13 to permit passage inclined slot are adjustably mounted on brackets to the form of a fork with two oppositely disposed of the longitudinal and arrange d with pivots at or over their centres of partl y flat tapering prongs stabilised by a bridge- formed with upstanding pressure and are shaped so as not to close the slot piece having flat ends lying on and rigidly connected flanges 14, which are in any adjusted position. Aerofoils 4 serve as t o th e flat ends of th e prongs. Fig. 1 shows a tube riveted a t 15 to down­ elevator s and aerofoils 13 as ailerons. A single 1 having an end shaped to form prongs 2, 3 between wardl y extending arms of the longitudinals 10. spar 10 is fitted. Vertical aerofoils 19 with or which a fluted bridge-piece 4 (Fig. 2) is secured by Th e skin is constituted by strips of thin sheet withou t adjustable flaps 18 ma y be arranged a t the rivet s 7 which also serve to secure external rein­ meta l 17 arrange d with their borders 18 overlapping, wing tips 17 and are of a section such as to give forcing members 10 riveted to tube 1 a t 11. Fig. 3 th e overlapping borders being secured to members a n inwardly directed reaction. These surfaces may shows a means for connnecting a number of 10 by a line of rivets 16. Borders 18 of each strip be adjustabl e oppositely t o obtai n greater directional mutuall y inclined tubular members to a main ar e shown bent to the shape of frames 5, but stabilit y or in the same sense. membe r 12 of tubula r or othe r section. A U-shaped according to a modification only one border of each bridge-piece 13 is bolte d to membe r 12 an d members stri p may be bent. Diagonal members such as 19, 18, 19 shaped as shown in Fig. 1 are bolted between Fig . 2, may be employed to reinforce the forward flat sides 15 of bridge-piece 13 so as to lie in the fuselage panel. same plane with member 12. Further tubular member s may be connected to tube 12 in a similar 392,447 . Aircraft wing structures . Dornier manne r but in a plane at right-angles to the con­ Metallbaute n Ges. and Dornier, C , Friedrichshafen, tainin g tubes 18, 19 by means of a second U-piece Lak e Constance, Germany. Oct. 31, 1932, No. 29 secured to a flat side of U-piece 13 b y the bolts 30598. Convention date, Dec. 8, 1931. [Class 4.] which secure the latter to member 12. U-piece 13 is fluted and apertured as shown. U-piece 29 is An aircraft wing having a single main spar a offset on bolts 22 to bring as great an area of its an d main ribs b spaced apart at comparatively base on the flat side 15 of U-piece 13. The large distances from one another is provided with tubula r member may be formed by bending steel auxiliary wing spars c disposed between the ribs b strip , causing the edges to approach one another. an d articulated thereto, one beam of each auxiliary These edges may or may not be connected spar being connected at each end to the top and together . botto m beams of the corresponding section of the spar a by diagonally arranged tension members d, e or diagonally arranged tension or compression 389,977 . Controlling Aircraft. Opel, F . Von, members . One end of spar c ma y be connected to Russelsheim-on-Main, Germany. March 2, 1932, spar a by a compression member or members and No . 6321. Convention date, March 2, 1931. th e other by a tension member or members. [Class 4.] Auxiliary ribs f are yieldingly and/or resiliently connected to the main and auxiliary spars. I n aircraft control apparatus of the type em­ bodying an electrically controlled hydraulic or pneumati c servomotor comprising a cylinder and piston connected to the control surface, the cylinder 16 is open a t one end and has an electromagnetically controlled inlet 15 for the pressure medium and a 392,905 . Aircraft fuselages. Vickers (Avia­ constan t outlet 20 at the other end and the piston tion), Ltd., and Wallis, B. N., Weybridge Works, 17 is associated with automatic means such as a Byfleet Road, Weybridge, Surrey. Nov. 23, 1931, spring 21 arranged at the open end of the cylinder No . 32397. [Class 4.] tendin g to return it to initial position whereby the An aircraft fuselage of the stressed skin type adjusted position of the control surface depends comprises a series of spaced polygonal transverse upon the duration and/o r frequency of manually or frames 5, Fig. 2, interconnected at the corners by automaticall y gener­ longitudina l members 10 and a skin comprising a ate d electric impulses. numbe r of sheets of thin material arranged in a Th e valve 15 may be series of flat panels bounded by adjacent longi­ actuate d by a motor- tudina l members to which they are secured a t their drive n interrupter, the overlappin g borders. In one form, Fig. 4, the speed of which may frames 5 are of open lattice work comprising b e varied by mechani­ inner and outer members 6, 7, united by radial cal or electrical means, member s 8 and crossed diagonals 9. Accor­ or by wireless or other ding to various modifications, the members 8 remot e control. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price Is. each. Except where otherwise staled, the specification is unaccom­ panied by drawings If none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 5 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1933

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029732
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Abstract

246 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING October, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 390,201 . Tail-less aeroplanes . Lippisch, A., ma y be omitted or Fliegerlager-Wasserkuppe, Post Gersfeld, Germany. th e inner member 6 Sept. 30, 1931. No . 27242. [Class 4.] ma y be asymetrical; for instance, of dia­ An aerofoil for arrow-shaped tail-less aircraft mond shape and be has a section which varies over the span from a connected to member 7 stabl e section at the root being merged gradually by Warren girder cross into sections having an inverse centre of pressure bracing . Transverse movemen t whereby the aerofoil has a substantially frames according to any constan t centre of pressure permitting th e employ­ of these modifications men t of a single spar. The aerofoil may be formed ma y be used in com­ with a continuous small slot between a large fore binatio n in one fuse­ par t and a small rear part, and this rear part may lage. The longitudinal be pivoted to form a control surface. Fig. 1 shows member s 10 are of an aerofoil of the above-described type in which a angle section and are 389,035 . Aircraft framework. A.T.S. Co., mai n par t 1 wit h a reflexly curved median line 7, 8, secured by gussets 11 Ltd. , 5, Clements Inn , Strand, London, and North, Fig . 2, is merged into a symmetrical section 12, riveted at the points J. D., Hill House, Katon Hill, Norwich. Oct. 17, Fig . 3, an d finally into a reversed aerofoil section 17, 12 to frame 5. The 1932, No. 28934. [Class 4.] Fig . 4. The small aerofoils 4, 13, formed by the gussets are cut away division of the main aerofoil into two parts by an Tubula r aircraft members have their ends shaped a t 13 to permit passage inclined slot are adjustably mounted on brackets to the form of a fork with two oppositely disposed of the longitudinal and arrange d with pivots at or over their centres of partl y flat tapering prongs stabilised by a bridge- formed with upstanding pressure and are shaped so as not to close the slot piece having flat ends lying on and rigidly connected flanges 14, which are in any adjusted position. Aerofoils 4 serve as t o th e flat ends of th e prongs. Fig. 1 shows a tube riveted a t 15 to down­ elevator s and aerofoils 13 as ailerons. A single 1 having an end shaped to form prongs 2, 3 between wardl y extending arms of the longitudinals 10. spar 10 is fitted. Vertical aerofoils 19 with or which a fluted bridge-piece 4 (Fig. 2) is secured by Th e skin is constituted by strips of thin sheet withou t adjustable flaps 18 ma y be arranged a t the rivet s 7 which also serve to secure external rein­ meta l 17 arrange d with their borders 18 overlapping, wing tips 17 and are of a section such as to give forcing members 10 riveted to tube 1 a t 11. Fig. 3 th e overlapping borders being secured to members a n inwardly directed reaction. These surfaces may shows a means for connnecting a number of 10 by a line of rivets 16. Borders 18 of each strip be adjustabl e oppositely t o obtai n greater directional mutuall y inclined tubular members to a main ar e shown bent to the shape of frames 5, but stabilit y or in the same sense. membe r 12 of tubula r or othe r section. A U-shaped according to a modification only one border of each bridge-piece 13 is bolte d to membe r 12 an d members stri p may be bent. Diagonal members such as 19, 18, 19 shaped as shown in Fig. 1 are bolted between Fig . 2, may be employed to reinforce the forward flat sides 15 of bridge-piece 13 so as to lie in the fuselage panel. same plane with member 12. Further tubular member s may be connected to tube 12 in a similar 392,447 . Aircraft wing structures . Dornier manne r but in a plane at right-angles to the con­ Metallbaute n Ges. and Dornier, C , Friedrichshafen, tainin g tubes 18, 19 by means of a second U-piece Lak e Constance, Germany. Oct. 31, 1932, No. 29 secured to a flat side of U-piece 13 b y the bolts 30598. Convention date, Dec. 8, 1931. [Class 4.] which secure the latter to member 12. U-piece 13 is fluted and apertured as shown. U-piece 29 is An aircraft wing having a single main spar a offset on bolts 22 to bring as great an area of its an d main ribs b spaced apart at comparatively base on the flat side 15 of U-piece 13. The large distances from one another is provided with tubula r member may be formed by bending steel auxiliary wing spars c disposed between the ribs b strip , causing the edges to approach one another. an d articulated thereto, one beam of each auxiliary These edges may or may not be connected spar being connected at each end to the top and together . botto m beams of the corresponding section of the spar a by diagonally arranged tension members d, e or diagonally arranged tension or compression 389,977 . Controlling Aircraft. Opel, F . Von, members . One end of spar c ma y be connected to Russelsheim-on-Main, Germany. March 2, 1932, spar a by a compression member or members and No . 6321. Convention date, March 2, 1931. th e other by a tension member or members. [Class 4.] Auxiliary ribs f are yieldingly and/or resiliently connected to the main and auxiliary spars. I n aircraft control apparatus of the type em­ bodying an electrically controlled hydraulic or pneumati c servomotor comprising a cylinder and piston connected to the control surface, the cylinder 16 is open a t one end and has an electromagnetically controlled inlet 15 for the pressure medium and a 392,905 . Aircraft fuselages. Vickers (Avia­ constan t outlet 20 at the other end and the piston tion), Ltd., and Wallis, B. N., Weybridge Works, 17 is associated with automatic means such as a Byfleet Road, Weybridge, Surrey. Nov. 23, 1931, spring 21 arranged at the open end of the cylinder No . 32397. [Class 4.] tendin g to return it to initial position whereby the An aircraft fuselage of the stressed skin type adjusted position of the control surface depends comprises a series of spaced polygonal transverse upon the duration and/o r frequency of manually or frames 5, Fig. 2, interconnected at the corners by automaticall y gener­ longitudina l members 10 and a skin comprising a ate d electric impulses. numbe r of sheets of thin material arranged in a Th e valve 15 may be series of flat panels bounded by adjacent longi­ actuate d by a motor- tudina l members to which they are secured a t their drive n interrupter, the overlappin g borders. In one form, Fig. 4, the speed of which may frames 5 are of open lattice work comprising b e varied by mechani­ inner and outer members 6, 7, united by radial cal or electrical means, member s 8 and crossed diagonals 9. Accor­ or by wireless or other ding to various modifications, the members 8 remot e control. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price Is. each. Except where otherwise staled, the specification is unaccom­ panied by drawings If none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1933

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