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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 72 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING March, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently channels, the spacing of which is governed by the 381,113 . Aircraft propelling gear. Zahn- numbe r of corrugations in each length. radfabrikFriedrichshafe n Akt.-Ges. (formerly Zahn- radfabrik Akt.-Ges.), Friedrichshafen, Lake Con­ stance , Germany. April 22, 1932, No. 11552. 382,979 . Aeroplane win g structures. A. T, Convention date, April 25, 1931. [Class 4.] S. Co., Ltd. and Wylie, H. N., 5, Clement's Inn, An aircraft or other propeller shaft driven from Strand , London. Aug. 28, 1931, No. 24236. two or more motors has means for disconnecting [Class 4.] an d connecting any motor at will, a delay-action I n an aeroplane wing in which the rib booms device being incorporated whereby th e change over ar e carried by one or more spars, inclined tension is completed automatically when there is no load members are arranged in the spaces between the transmitte d between the motor and the propeller spars or in the spaces on each side of a single spar. shaft. Fig. 1 shows a propeller shaft S driven I n a wing having fore and aft spars 7, 8, Fig. I, throug h bevel gear from two motor shafts Ml, M2 th e portion of the ribs between the spars are each throug h two dog-clutches 4, 5. The ends of the supported (a) by a basic structure of triangular teet h on the clutch members 4, 5 are bevelled in form comprising one of th e booms 6 an d two tension such a direction tha t engagement is prevented until members 9, 10 connected to the boom a t the points th e motor shaft speed has become equal to the where it meets the spars 7, 8, the members 9, 10 speed of th e member 5. Each member 4 is mounted meeting one another at a point 11 in the rib struc­ on a shaft 41 capable of sliding through a member tur e between the spars, and (i) by a secondary 9 driven from the motor shaft through clastic discs structur e based on the point II which structure 11, teeth 10 preventing overload of the discs by ma y comprise the short auxiliary bracing members limiting the amount of relative rotation. The 12. The upper boom 5 may be supported by a shaft 41 is connected by a bearing 14 to a member tension member connected to the bottom of one of 15 having a quick-threaded screw 17 engaged by a th e spars. The apex of the basic triangular struc­ nu t 18 provided with an actuating lever 19. The tur e 6, 9, 10 ma y be on th e upper boom 5 of the rib, uppe r end of this lever is engaged by a slotted mem­ U-section secured within the channels, the flanges an d may be connected by a stru t to the lower boom ber containing a spring which becomes compressed of the braces 4 being connected at intervals by 6, additional bracings connecting the lower end of if the nut is unable to move the member 15. A plates 9. The leading spar comprises a corrugated th e strut with the upper ends of the spars. In a stri p 2a secured to a nose piece 26 by plates 2c. wing having only one spar 18, Fig. 4, each rib is Th e cover is secured to the spars and to light laths supporte d by struts 19, 29 disposed fore and aft 5, 6 conforming to the contour of the wing and of the spar, the two bays thus formed being braced secured to the bracing 4 by members 10. Where a metal covering is used the laths penetrate the bracin g 4 which is shaped to the profile, and the covering is secured to spars, bracing and laths which may be of light flanged channel section. Th e members 4 are secured to the spar member 2a by shaped gusset-plates riveted to the spar and members 4. Where external bracing is connected to a subsidiary spar the adjacent member 4 is reinforced. toothed disc 12 on the other end of the shaft 41 occupies the position shown to the left of Fig. 1 when the clutch 4, 5 is engaged and owing to 382,700 . Aircraft structural elements. relative displacement of the motor shaft and part A. T. S. Co., Ltd., Wylie, H. N., and Sanders, S., 9 under torque is unable to pass through a toothed 5, Clement's Inn, Strand, London. Aug. 31, 1931, ring 13 on the motor shaft. As soon as the torque No . 24399. [Class 4.] becomes zero the member 12 can pass through the I n tapering structural metal members for aircraft ring 13 and the clutch member 4, 5 can be disen­ a web or other sheet-metal part is provided having gaged. a number of adjacent lengths 6, 8 of tapering width b y pairs of diagonal members 20, 21 and 22, 23. each containing some corrugations 2 having a th e booms 5, 6 being supported by secondary 382,176 . Aircraft wing structures. Soc. uniform cross section throughout the length and bracin g members 12 based on the intersections of Anon, des Ateliers d'Aviation L. Breguet, 24, Rue one or more corrugations 1 whic h diminish through­ th e diagonals. Georges Bizet, Paris. Feb. 24, 1932, No. 5520. ou t the length and may disappear, the diminishing Convention date, March 25, 1931. [Glass 4.] corrugations - taper to 383,089 . Driving gear. Bristol Aeroplane An aircraft wing structure comprises a main being identi- nothing or Co., Ltd., Fedden, A. II. R., and Butler, L. F. G., spar arranged at the greatest thickness of the pro­ cal in shape a d j a c e n t Filto n House, Bristol. Dec. 17, 1931, No. 35017. file and two subsidiary spars one at the leading bu t not nee- tops or bot- [Class 7 (ii).] edge and the other a t the position where ailerons or essarily in toms may I n engines having the cylinders arranged in one flaps are hinged, the spars being braced together, position in taper to- or more rows, the drive to a propeller shaft 10 is by oblique and consecutive members themselves each length, gether, the throug h two or more valve-actuating shafts 15, formed as rigid trussed girders, and the covering and the ad- separating 16 ; the speed-reducing gearing 20, 21, 22 between being secured to light laths a t right-angles to the jacen t ends corrugation th e propeller shaft and the shafts 15, 16 is adjacent spars and extending over or intersecting th e bracing of th e length s tapering to a th e drive 17, 18, 19 for the latter shafts from the members to which they are secured. Fig. 2 shows being sub- flute. The crankshaf t 12. A blower 13 is driven off the a plan of a wing in which a main spar 1, arranged stantiall y adjacent furthe r ends of the shafts 15, 16. A spring drive a t about one-third of the wing chord from the identical . lengths may leading edge, is braced to two subsidiary spars 2, Th e tapering overlap and 3 by rigid braces 4. The braces 4 may be of Hanged corrugation s be riveted channe l section connected by struts 7, Fig. 3, of ma y dimin- or otherwise ish in width connected or o n 1 y t o a may be con- ridge which nectcd by * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery ma y be separate Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified rounded . straps or into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from Th e flat tops plates, and the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, cither sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of or bottoms of they may be 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of ma y be incorporated in the transmission to the th e corruga- reinforced by the full specifications can be obtained from the same address propeller and to the blower. The cylinders may be tions may be transverse price 1s. each. inclined or their axes may form an X with the stiffened by stiffening Except where otherwise staled, the specification is unaccom­ shafts 15, 16 arranged between pairs of cylinders. panied by drawings if none is reproduced. ilutes which pieces or by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 5 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1933

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Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029668
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Abstract

72 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING March, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently channels, the spacing of which is governed by the 381,113 . Aircraft propelling gear. Zahn- numbe r of corrugations in each length. radfabrikFriedrichshafe n Akt.-Ges. (formerly Zahn- radfabrik Akt.-Ges.), Friedrichshafen, Lake Con­ stance , Germany. April 22, 1932, No. 11552. 382,979 . Aeroplane win g structures. A. T, Convention date, April 25, 1931. [Class 4.] S. Co., Ltd. and Wylie, H. N., 5, Clement's Inn, An aircraft or other propeller shaft driven from Strand , London. Aug. 28, 1931, No. 24236. two or more motors has means for disconnecting [Class 4.] an d connecting any motor at will, a delay-action I n an aeroplane wing in which the rib booms device being incorporated whereby th e change over ar e carried by one or more spars, inclined tension is completed automatically when there is no load members are arranged in the spaces between the transmitte d between the motor and the propeller spars or in the spaces on each side of a single spar. shaft. Fig. 1 shows a propeller shaft S driven I n a wing having fore and aft spars 7, 8, Fig. I, throug h bevel gear from two motor shafts Ml, M2 th e portion of the ribs between the spars are each throug h two dog-clutches 4, 5. The ends of the supported (a) by a basic structure of triangular teet h on the clutch members 4, 5 are bevelled in form comprising one of th e booms 6 an d two tension such a direction tha t engagement is prevented until members 9, 10 connected to the boom a t the points th e motor shaft speed has become equal to the where it meets the spars 7, 8, the members 9, 10 speed of th e member 5. Each member 4 is mounted meeting one another at a point 11 in the rib struc­ on a shaft 41 capable of sliding through a member tur e between the spars, and (i) by a secondary 9 driven from the motor shaft through clastic discs structur e based on the point II which structure 11, teeth 10 preventing overload of the discs by ma y comprise the short auxiliary bracing members limiting the amount of relative rotation. The 12. The upper boom 5 may be supported by a shaft 41 is connected by a bearing 14 to a member tension member connected to the bottom of one of 15 having a quick-threaded screw 17 engaged by a th e spars. The apex of the basic triangular struc­ nu t 18 provided with an actuating lever 19. The tur e 6, 9, 10 ma y be on th e upper boom 5 of the rib, uppe r end of this lever is engaged by a slotted mem­ U-section secured within the channels, the flanges an d may be connected by a stru t to the lower boom ber containing a spring which becomes compressed of the braces 4 being connected at intervals by 6, additional bracings connecting the lower end of if the nut is unable to move the member 15. A plates 9. The leading spar comprises a corrugated th e strut with the upper ends of the spars. In a stri p 2a secured to a nose piece 26 by plates 2c. wing having only one spar 18, Fig. 4, each rib is Th e cover is secured to the spars and to light laths supporte d by struts 19, 29 disposed fore and aft 5, 6 conforming to the contour of the wing and of the spar, the two bays thus formed being braced secured to the bracing 4 by members 10. Where a metal covering is used the laths penetrate the bracin g 4 which is shaped to the profile, and the covering is secured to spars, bracing and laths which may be of light flanged channel section. Th e members 4 are secured to the spar member 2a by shaped gusset-plates riveted to the spar and members 4. Where external bracing is connected to a subsidiary spar the adjacent member 4 is reinforced. toothed disc 12 on the other end of the shaft 41 occupies the position shown to the left of Fig. 1 when the clutch 4, 5 is engaged and owing to 382,700 . Aircraft structural elements. relative displacement of the motor shaft and part A. T. S. Co., Ltd., Wylie, H. N., and Sanders, S., 9 under torque is unable to pass through a toothed 5, Clement's Inn, Strand, London. Aug. 31, 1931, ring 13 on the motor shaft. As soon as the torque No . 24399. [Class 4.] becomes zero the member 12 can pass through the I n tapering structural metal members for aircraft ring 13 and the clutch member 4, 5 can be disen­ a web or other sheet-metal part is provided having gaged. a number of adjacent lengths 6, 8 of tapering width b y pairs of diagonal members 20, 21 and 22, 23. each containing some corrugations 2 having a th e booms 5, 6 being supported by secondary 382,176 . Aircraft wing structures. Soc. uniform cross section throughout the length and bracin g members 12 based on the intersections of Anon, des Ateliers d'Aviation L. Breguet, 24, Rue one or more corrugations 1 whic h diminish through­ th e diagonals. Georges Bizet, Paris. Feb. 24, 1932, No. 5520. ou t the length and may disappear, the diminishing Convention date, March 25, 1931. [Glass 4.] corrugations - taper to 383,089 . Driving gear. Bristol Aeroplane An aircraft wing structure comprises a main being identi- nothing or Co., Ltd., Fedden, A. II. R., and Butler, L. F. G., spar arranged at the greatest thickness of the pro­ cal in shape a d j a c e n t Filto n House, Bristol. Dec. 17, 1931, No. 35017. file and two subsidiary spars one at the leading bu t not nee- tops or bot- [Class 7 (ii).] edge and the other a t the position where ailerons or essarily in toms may I n engines having the cylinders arranged in one flaps are hinged, the spars being braced together, position in taper to- or more rows, the drive to a propeller shaft 10 is by oblique and consecutive members themselves each length, gether, the throug h two or more valve-actuating shafts 15, formed as rigid trussed girders, and the covering and the ad- separating 16 ; the speed-reducing gearing 20, 21, 22 between being secured to light laths a t right-angles to the jacen t ends corrugation th e propeller shaft and the shafts 15, 16 is adjacent spars and extending over or intersecting th e bracing of th e length s tapering to a th e drive 17, 18, 19 for the latter shafts from the members to which they are secured. Fig. 2 shows being sub- flute. The crankshaf t 12. A blower 13 is driven off the a plan of a wing in which a main spar 1, arranged stantiall y adjacent furthe r ends of the shafts 15, 16. A spring drive a t about one-third of the wing chord from the identical . lengths may leading edge, is braced to two subsidiary spars 2, Th e tapering overlap and 3 by rigid braces 4. The braces 4 may be of Hanged corrugation s be riveted channe l section connected by struts 7, Fig. 3, of ma y dimin- or otherwise ish in width connected or o n 1 y t o a may be con- ridge which nectcd by * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery ma y be separate Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified rounded . straps or into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from Th e flat tops plates, and the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, cither sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of or bottoms of they may be 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of ma y be incorporated in the transmission to the th e corruga- reinforced by the full specifications can be obtained from the same address propeller and to the blower. The cylinders may be tions may be transverse price 1s. each. inclined or their axes may form an X with the stiffened by stiffening Except where otherwise staled, the specification is unaccom­ shafts 15, 16 arranged between pairs of cylinders. panied by drawings if none is reproduced. ilutes which pieces or by

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1933

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