Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office September, 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications are shown as tubular in Fig. 2. On the outer is desired valves s, w are opened, the former No . 313,149. Aircraft. Lepere, E. M. G., side of each frame the clamps 3' are in the acting to enlarge the delivery port m by the 23, Rue Theophile Gautier, Paris. April 24, form of tubular stumps 4 provided with addition of the port n and the latter serving to 1929, No. 12772. Convention date, June 9, sighting-marks 14. A sighting tube 10 is short-circuit the whole pump. The vanes are 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open pivotally mounted on one of the bars 2 in such spaced so tha t when the port n is opened by t o inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. a way that when the frame 1 is correctly set, means of the valve s the spaces between the [Class 4.] all th e marks 14 mus t lie in the plane swept by vanes are never isolated. The valves s, w may Planes and wings, construction of.—An aero­ th e sighting tube 10. A plumb line 8 may be be operated by a relay under barometric control. plane wing is composed of a number of inde- provided for setting the frame 1 vertica l before A spring y normally keeps th e valves s, w open. formable sections which are threaded on a connecting the stays 9. The clamps 3' are When with decreasing atmospheric pressure a spa r or spars and are connected together on movable longitudinally to enable any one barometric device 4 makes contact with a assembly by rivets or similar means. In each member 16 to be detached. rheosta t 3 a solenoid 2 acts in opposition to section 3 a covering of sheet metal or plywood, th e spring and the valves are shut more and more as the resistance at 3 is cut out. A similar control may be exerted by the throttle, th e movement of which may be arranged to cu t out resistance at 22. The valves s, w ma y be operated independently, the valve s being opened first. In another form of blower th e rotor which has radially sliding vanes is stiffened by corrugations or ribs, is fixed to moved into a central position within the casing th e leading edge member 4 and to a sectional when supercharging is no t desired. The Provi­ dumm y spar 13 or to the trailing edge if no sional Specification describes also the use of a aileron is fitted at that point. Marginal angle centrifugal blower having diffuser blades which strip s 6 form a means of attachment for sheet- ma y be adjusted to prevent compression. metal plate ribs 7 which close each section. These plate ribs are strengthened by upright members 8 and are pierced with apertures 9 for the insertion of spar 1. The flanges of the spa r 1 are accommodated in channel guides 10 riveted to the inner faces of the covering. Eac h section is threaded along the spar and secured by angle plates 11 riveted to the plate ribs, and to gussets 12 riveted to the spar web. Th e marginal angle strips 6 of adjacent sections ar e riveted together and the lading and trailing edges connected up to complete the assembly. No . 313,162. Aircraft. Junkers, H., 21, Kaiserplatz, Dessau, Anhalt, Germany. May 25 , 1929, No. 16179. Convention date, June 8, 1928. Not ye t accepted. Abridged as open to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. [Class 4.] No . 313,417. Superchargers. Eyston, G. E . T., 329, High Holborn, London. Jan. 9, Repairing and assembling.—A jig for use when 1928, No. 734. [Classes 7 (vi) and 110 (ii).] assembling transverse or subsidiary members t o the main longitudinal members of a struc­ Superchargers for internal-combustion engines ture , such as th e wing of an aeroplane, consists having valved or other parts for varying the of two templet frames 1 mounted on hinges secured to a bed plate or floor and maintains in a vertical position when in use by stays 9. Th e templets 1 are planar structures consisting of a number of frame bars 2, the junctures of which are provided with clamping devices 3' for holding th e longitudinal members 16, which * The following abstracts of complete specifica­ tions of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, degree of supercharging are constructed so from abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. tha t no increase or fluctuation of pressure Printed copies of the full specifications can be occurs in the superchargers when the parts are obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton adjusted to prevent supercharging. A rotary Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. pum p having sliding rocking vanes e delivers Except where otherwise stated, if no illustration compressed air when supercharging across a is reproduced the specification is unaccompanied by drawings. por t m into a cavity p. When no supercharging http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 1 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1929

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029184
Publisher site
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Abstract

September, 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications are shown as tubular in Fig. 2. On the outer is desired valves s, w are opened, the former No . 313,149. Aircraft. Lepere, E. M. G., side of each frame the clamps 3' are in the acting to enlarge the delivery port m by the 23, Rue Theophile Gautier, Paris. April 24, form of tubular stumps 4 provided with addition of the port n and the latter serving to 1929, No. 12772. Convention date, June 9, sighting-marks 14. A sighting tube 10 is short-circuit the whole pump. The vanes are 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open pivotally mounted on one of the bars 2 in such spaced so tha t when the port n is opened by t o inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. a way that when the frame 1 is correctly set, means of the valve s the spaces between the [Class 4.] all th e marks 14 mus t lie in the plane swept by vanes are never isolated. The valves s, w may Planes and wings, construction of.—An aero­ th e sighting tube 10. A plumb line 8 may be be operated by a relay under barometric control. plane wing is composed of a number of inde- provided for setting the frame 1 vertica l before A spring y normally keeps th e valves s, w open. formable sections which are threaded on a connecting the stays 9. The clamps 3' are When with decreasing atmospheric pressure a spa r or spars and are connected together on movable longitudinally to enable any one barometric device 4 makes contact with a assembly by rivets or similar means. In each member 16 to be detached. rheosta t 3 a solenoid 2 acts in opposition to section 3 a covering of sheet metal or plywood, th e spring and the valves are shut more and more as the resistance at 3 is cut out. A similar control may be exerted by the throttle, th e movement of which may be arranged to cu t out resistance at 22. The valves s, w ma y be operated independently, the valve s being opened first. In another form of blower th e rotor which has radially sliding vanes is stiffened by corrugations or ribs, is fixed to moved into a central position within the casing th e leading edge member 4 and to a sectional when supercharging is no t desired. The Provi­ dumm y spar 13 or to the trailing edge if no sional Specification describes also the use of a aileron is fitted at that point. Marginal angle centrifugal blower having diffuser blades which strip s 6 form a means of attachment for sheet- ma y be adjusted to prevent compression. metal plate ribs 7 which close each section. These plate ribs are strengthened by upright members 8 and are pierced with apertures 9 for the insertion of spar 1. The flanges of the spa r 1 are accommodated in channel guides 10 riveted to the inner faces of the covering. Eac h section is threaded along the spar and secured by angle plates 11 riveted to the plate ribs, and to gussets 12 riveted to the spar web. Th e marginal angle strips 6 of adjacent sections ar e riveted together and the lading and trailing edges connected up to complete the assembly. No . 313,162. Aircraft. Junkers, H., 21, Kaiserplatz, Dessau, Anhalt, Germany. May 25 , 1929, No. 16179. Convention date, June 8, 1928. Not ye t accepted. Abridged as open to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. [Class 4.] No . 313,417. Superchargers. Eyston, G. E . T., 329, High Holborn, London. Jan. 9, Repairing and assembling.—A jig for use when 1928, No. 734. [Classes 7 (vi) and 110 (ii).] assembling transverse or subsidiary members t o the main longitudinal members of a struc­ Superchargers for internal-combustion engines ture , such as th e wing of an aeroplane, consists having valved or other parts for varying the of two templet frames 1 mounted on hinges secured to a bed plate or floor and maintains in a vertical position when in use by stays 9. Th e templets 1 are planar structures consisting of a number of frame bars 2, the junctures of which are provided with clamping devices 3' for holding th e longitudinal members 16, which * The following abstracts of complete specifica­ tions of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, degree of supercharging are constructed so from abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. tha t no increase or fluctuation of pressure Printed copies of the full specifications can be occurs in the superchargers when the parts are obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton adjusted to prevent supercharging. A rotary Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. pum p having sliding rocking vanes e delivers Except where otherwise stated, if no illustration compressed air when supercharging across a is reproduced the specification is unaccompanied by drawings. por t m into a cavity p. When no supercharging

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1929

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