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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office rear spar 38, streamlined struts 45, 46, 47, inner stringers 41, 42, 43, 44 and external ribs 32, 33. The Month in the Patent Office root of the inboard portion 11 is provided with a lattice stiffening, the remainder being strengthened in a similar manner to the portion 12. An air or gas jet These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official outlet 23 is provided at the blade tip, together with deflecting vanes 24. The construction is such that the specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton centre of gravity of the blade lies substantially on the Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. pitch change axis 62, which in turn is located at about one-quarter of the chord from the leading edge so as to be in line with the mean centre of aerodynamic of the working section 23 so that the working fluid 720,394. Engine installations. Rolls-Royce Ltd. force on the blade, thereby reducing blade twist. is provided solely by the turbine exhaust. The exhaust Application August 16, 1951. pipe 12 is connected by a spherical expansion joint 14 An engine installation consists of a main turbo-jet to the smaller end of a divergent settling chamber 15 721,530. Glider lifeboats. Saunders-Roe Ltd. unit 11, preferably of the by-pass type, in the tail of whose other end is connected by a second expansion Application March 8, 1951. the fuselage, and a series of slave turbine units 14 joint 19 to a convergent-divergent duct 20, 22 com­ A glider lifeboat for air-sea rescue work consists of municating with the working section 23, which dis­ a boat 10 with a double-ended hull similar to that of a charges into a convergent-divergent duct or, as shown, conventional lifeboat, to which are detachably secured into a divergent duct 24. To avoid different cooling cantilever wings 18 and a tail boom extending aft from rates in the walls of the working section, owing to the the stern of the boat and carrying elevators 20 and a passage of the hot exhaust gases, it and the duct fin 21. The wings and tail unit are jettisoned after the 20, 22 are enclosed in a cylindrical insulating casing, craft has been towed to the desired spot and has the panels 32 of which are of sandwich construction alighted on the water, either by the release of hooks consisting of asbestos between metal sheets, the inner sheets being polished. Electric or other heaters may be fitted between the walls of the working section and the insulating casing to allow pre-heating of the work­ ing section before starting up, in order to avoid distortion. 720,600. Rotor blades. De Havilland Propellers Ltd. Application February 2, 1952. A blade for the rotor of a helicopter or wind motor is made of light alloy and consists of inboard and outboard stressed-skin portions 11, 12 connected by flanged steel straps 13, 14, the inboard portion 11 being circular at the root and changing to aerodynamic operated by push rods in the cockpit or by explosives; section corresponding to that of the outboard portion provision is also made for disconnecting the cables 12, FIG. 4, at its outer end. The outboard portion con­ operating the control surfaces. A water rudder 60 on sists of a leading edge spar 28 connected to upper and the boat may be connected to the aileron control lower metal sheets 26, 27 extending over approxi­ cables after the wings have been jettisoned. The wings mately one-third of the chord, where they are secured and tail unit may be made buoyant for salvaging and to thinner sheets 29, 30 extending to the trailing edge the prow of the boat may be of sledge form to ride 31. This portion is stiffened by a main spar consisting up on a beach, or it may be similar to the prow of a of two flanged plates 34, 35 riveted together, a lighter landing craft, having a watertight door which can be lowered to form a landing ramp. 721,987. Fly or insect removing device. Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Ltd. Application December 3, A device for removing flics or insects from the lead­ ing edge 10 of a wing or control surface consists of a scraper member in the form of a spring-tensioned wire or chain 35, whose ends are connected to magnetic armatures 34 held against the wing surface by per­ mounted in the flaps 13, whereby direct lift assisting manent or coil magnets 12,13 mounted on a vertical in the control of ascent or descent may be obtained carrier 11 which is movable along a guide rail 24, to upon lowering the flaps, the maximum angle of de­ operate the scraper, by a pin 27 driven by a chain 25 flexion of which may be approximately 90 deg. Fuel and sprocket 26. When not in use the scraper may be for the slave units 14 is supplied by pumps, driven by housed alongside a boundary layer fence or retracted the main unit 11, through transverse tubes 21, forming into the fuselage at the wing root, appropriate openings the hinges for the flaps. Air is supplied through ducts closable by shutters being provided in the fuselage wall. 19 opening into the leading edges of the wings, except when the flaps are lowered, when it enters through the gaps opened between the upper surfaces of the wings and flaps. Instead of being adjustable one or more slave units may be fixed in the wing and directed down­ wardly, such unit(s) only being used during ascent or descent. Lateral control of the aircraft, when it is supported by jet thrust, may be obtained by differential adjustment of the fuel supply to the port and starboard sets of slave units 14. Longitudinal control may be provided by deflexion of the exhaust from the main unit 11, or by fuel control or angular adjustment of one or more fixed or pivotally mounted additional slave units in the tail unit of the aircraft. Some or all of the slave units 14 may be cut out during low speed flight to give increased fuel economy when cruising. 720,466. Wind tunnels. Rolls-Royce Ltd. Applica­ tion December 22, 1950. In a wind tunnel of the type in which the exhaust flow from a gas turbine is employed to cause flow of the working fluid, the turbine 10 is mounted upstream May 1955 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 27 (5): 1 – May 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032558
Publisher site
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Abstract

rear spar 38, streamlined struts 45, 46, 47, inner stringers 41, 42, 43, 44 and external ribs 32, 33. The Month in the Patent Office root of the inboard portion 11 is provided with a lattice stiffening, the remainder being strengthened in a similar manner to the portion 12. An air or gas jet These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official outlet 23 is provided at the blade tip, together with deflecting vanes 24. The construction is such that the specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton centre of gravity of the blade lies substantially on the Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. pitch change axis 62, which in turn is located at about one-quarter of the chord from the leading edge so as to be in line with the mean centre of aerodynamic of the working section 23 so that the working fluid 720,394. Engine installations. Rolls-Royce Ltd. force on the blade, thereby reducing blade twist. is provided solely by the turbine exhaust. The exhaust Application August 16, 1951. pipe 12 is connected by a spherical expansion joint 14 An engine installation consists of a main turbo-jet to the smaller end of a divergent settling chamber 15 721,530. Glider lifeboats. Saunders-Roe Ltd. unit 11, preferably of the by-pass type, in the tail of whose other end is connected by a second expansion Application March 8, 1951. the fuselage, and a series of slave turbine units 14 joint 19 to a convergent-divergent duct 20, 22 com­ A glider lifeboat for air-sea rescue work consists of municating with the working section 23, which dis­ a boat 10 with a double-ended hull similar to that of a charges into a convergent-divergent duct or, as shown, conventional lifeboat, to which are detachably secured into a divergent duct 24. To avoid different cooling cantilever wings 18 and a tail boom extending aft from rates in the walls of the working section, owing to the the stern of the boat and carrying elevators 20 and a passage of the hot exhaust gases, it and the duct fin 21. The wings and tail unit are jettisoned after the 20, 22 are enclosed in a cylindrical insulating casing, craft has been towed to the desired spot and has the panels 32 of which are of sandwich construction alighted on the water, either by the release of hooks consisting of asbestos between metal sheets, the inner sheets being polished. Electric or other heaters may be fitted between the walls of the working section and the insulating casing to allow pre-heating of the work­ ing section before starting up, in order to avoid distortion. 720,600. Rotor blades. De Havilland Propellers Ltd. Application February 2, 1952. A blade for the rotor of a helicopter or wind motor is made of light alloy and consists of inboard and outboard stressed-skin portions 11, 12 connected by flanged steel straps 13, 14, the inboard portion 11 being circular at the root and changing to aerodynamic operated by push rods in the cockpit or by explosives; section corresponding to that of the outboard portion provision is also made for disconnecting the cables 12, FIG. 4, at its outer end. The outboard portion con­ operating the control surfaces. A water rudder 60 on sists of a leading edge spar 28 connected to upper and the boat may be connected to the aileron control lower metal sheets 26, 27 extending over approxi­ cables after the wings have been jettisoned. The wings mately one-third of the chord, where they are secured and tail unit may be made buoyant for salvaging and to thinner sheets 29, 30 extending to the trailing edge the prow of the boat may be of sledge form to ride 31. This portion is stiffened by a main spar consisting up on a beach, or it may be similar to the prow of a of two flanged plates 34, 35 riveted together, a lighter landing craft, having a watertight door which can be lowered to form a landing ramp. 721,987. Fly or insect removing device. Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Ltd. Application December 3, A device for removing flics or insects from the lead­ ing edge 10 of a wing or control surface consists of a scraper member in the form of a spring-tensioned wire or chain 35, whose ends are connected to magnetic armatures 34 held against the wing surface by per­ mounted in the flaps 13, whereby direct lift assisting manent or coil magnets 12,13 mounted on a vertical in the control of ascent or descent may be obtained carrier 11 which is movable along a guide rail 24, to upon lowering the flaps, the maximum angle of de­ operate the scraper, by a pin 27 driven by a chain 25 flexion of which may be approximately 90 deg. Fuel and sprocket 26. When not in use the scraper may be for the slave units 14 is supplied by pumps, driven by housed alongside a boundary layer fence or retracted the main unit 11, through transverse tubes 21, forming into the fuselage at the wing root, appropriate openings the hinges for the flaps. Air is supplied through ducts closable by shutters being provided in the fuselage wall. 19 opening into the leading edges of the wings, except when the flaps are lowered, when it enters through the gaps opened between the upper surfaces of the wings and flaps. Instead of being adjustable one or more slave units may be fixed in the wing and directed down­ wardly, such unit(s) only being used during ascent or descent. Lateral control of the aircraft, when it is supported by jet thrust, may be obtained by differential adjustment of the fuel supply to the port and starboard sets of slave units 14. Longitudinal control may be provided by deflexion of the exhaust from the main unit 11, or by fuel control or angular adjustment of one or more fixed or pivotally mounted additional slave units in the tail unit of the aircraft. Some or all of the slave units 14 may be cut out during low speed flight to give increased fuel economy when cruising. 720,466. Wind tunnels. Rolls-Royce Ltd. Applica­ tion December 22, 1950. In a wind tunnel of the type in which the exhaust flow from a gas turbine is employed to cause flow of the working fluid, the turbine 10 is mounted upstream May 1955

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1955

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