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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 216 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1930 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 326,644 . Aircraft. Armstrong Whitworth between them is the angle of drift: the third No . 328,481 . Aircraft engines.—Boulton side the n represents wind speed. & Paul, Ltd., Riverside Works, and North, Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., Green, F. M., and J . D., Hill House, Eato n Hill, bot h in Norwich. Reynolds, It., Par k Side, Coventry. Feb. 25, May 28, 1929, No. 16408. [Classes 4 and 7 (ii).] 1929, Nos. 6098 and 35075. [Class 4.] Cylinders, cooling.—An annular cowling Planes, construction of; balancing.—The having a bulbous leading edge 2 extends upper surface of an aeroplane wing is provided around an air-cooled radial cylinder engine to with vents 4, 9 parallel t o and respectively near direct the cooling air over the cylinder heads th e leading edge and near the junction of the and reduce the head resistance. The cowling wing and its aileron, these vent s communicating is of stream line form and the thin trailing edge with a region of higher pressure at the wing tip. 3 ma y extend over the cylinders as shown, or up The air intakes may be controlled by valves or t o the cylinders only. louvres which may be interconnected with the A calculating-device which may b e used to find th e wind speed, etc., comprises a chart, Fig. 5, ailerons. The lateral edge of the wing is and a superposed transparent circle, Fig. 6. The bevelled to present a slope towards the under­ char t has a number of arcs e1 . . e5 struck side, or it may be given a forward rake to from a point Q and representing air and ground provide an air intake. speeds and a number of lines n1 . . n5 radiating Exhaust silencers.—Pipes may extend from Fig. 6 shows a plate 8 interconnected with from the point Q and representing drift angles. th e cylinder exhaust ports to th e inner portion 5 an aileron 6 for controlling the inlet through The circle is marked with radiating lines l1, l2, of the cowling, the exhaust gases being drawn th e end of the wing, the inlet being closed etc., and with circles f1, f2 representing different from the cowling by pipes projecting outwardly when the aileron is in its normal position. values of wind velocity. If, for example, with and rearwardly. Fig . 9 shows an alternative control com­ a n air speed of 33 metres per sec. and the rudde r central the ground speed is 23 metres prising louvres 10 which may be set to per sec. and the drift angle 10 degrees, the deflect air into or out of the wing. During a spin these louvres may be set in opposite point R of intersection of the 23-metrc and directions to increase and diminish the lifts on 10-degree lines is noted on the chart and the th e two wings. transparen t circle is placed over the chart with its zero graduation in line wit h the point Q. The point on the circle which lies above the 327,777 . Aircraft Instruments. France, poin t R is then joined to the centre P of the Stat e of, Minister of Air, Paris.—(Assignee of circle and the line so obtained is the wind Marie F. ; Cazaux, Gironde, France.) Jan. 22, vector. 1929, No. 2172. Convention date, Oct. 19, 1928. [Classes 97 (ii) and 106 (i).] A sighting-device for use on aircraft for determining the angle of drift and the velocity and direction of the wind comprises a hori­ zontal graduated circle a having its zero on the longitudinal axis of the craft and an arc of a vertical circle b which can slide round the circle a, the circles a, b being universally suspended by members m from a support s secured to the aircraft. The are b carries slidable sights c1, c2, and a vertical rod v1 passing through the centre of the circle a and journaled at its lower end in the are b has at its upper end a sight v. I n using th e device th e are b is turne d until i t is parallel to the apparent direction of movement of objects on th e ground, and the drift angle is the n read off on the circle a. If the altitude is known the ground speed can be determined b y noting the time at which an object on the ground is in line with the rod v, and the time a t which it reaches the sighting line vcl or vc2. The n if the air speed is known, the wind speed an d direction are obtained by constructing a vecto r triangle, of which two sides represent air speed and ground speed and the angle * The abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, price one shilling each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 2 (8): 1 – Aug 1, 1930

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029307
Publisher site
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Abstract

216 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1930 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 326,644 . Aircraft. Armstrong Whitworth between them is the angle of drift: the third No . 328,481 . Aircraft engines.—Boulton side the n represents wind speed. & Paul, Ltd., Riverside Works, and North, Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., Green, F. M., and J . D., Hill House, Eato n Hill, bot h in Norwich. Reynolds, It., Par k Side, Coventry. Feb. 25, May 28, 1929, No. 16408. [Classes 4 and 7 (ii).] 1929, Nos. 6098 and 35075. [Class 4.] Cylinders, cooling.—An annular cowling Planes, construction of; balancing.—The having a bulbous leading edge 2 extends upper surface of an aeroplane wing is provided around an air-cooled radial cylinder engine to with vents 4, 9 parallel t o and respectively near direct the cooling air over the cylinder heads th e leading edge and near the junction of the and reduce the head resistance. The cowling wing and its aileron, these vent s communicating is of stream line form and the thin trailing edge with a region of higher pressure at the wing tip. 3 ma y extend over the cylinders as shown, or up The air intakes may be controlled by valves or t o the cylinders only. louvres which may be interconnected with the A calculating-device which may b e used to find th e wind speed, etc., comprises a chart, Fig. 5, ailerons. The lateral edge of the wing is and a superposed transparent circle, Fig. 6. The bevelled to present a slope towards the under­ char t has a number of arcs e1 . . e5 struck side, or it may be given a forward rake to from a point Q and representing air and ground provide an air intake. speeds and a number of lines n1 . . n5 radiating Exhaust silencers.—Pipes may extend from Fig. 6 shows a plate 8 interconnected with from the point Q and representing drift angles. th e cylinder exhaust ports to th e inner portion 5 an aileron 6 for controlling the inlet through The circle is marked with radiating lines l1, l2, of the cowling, the exhaust gases being drawn th e end of the wing, the inlet being closed etc., and with circles f1, f2 representing different from the cowling by pipes projecting outwardly when the aileron is in its normal position. values of wind velocity. If, for example, with and rearwardly. Fig . 9 shows an alternative control com­ a n air speed of 33 metres per sec. and the rudde r central the ground speed is 23 metres prising louvres 10 which may be set to per sec. and the drift angle 10 degrees, the deflect air into or out of the wing. During a spin these louvres may be set in opposite point R of intersection of the 23-metrc and directions to increase and diminish the lifts on 10-degree lines is noted on the chart and the th e two wings. transparen t circle is placed over the chart with its zero graduation in line wit h the point Q. The point on the circle which lies above the 327,777 . Aircraft Instruments. France, poin t R is then joined to the centre P of the Stat e of, Minister of Air, Paris.—(Assignee of circle and the line so obtained is the wind Marie F. ; Cazaux, Gironde, France.) Jan. 22, vector. 1929, No. 2172. Convention date, Oct. 19, 1928. [Classes 97 (ii) and 106 (i).] A sighting-device for use on aircraft for determining the angle of drift and the velocity and direction of the wind comprises a hori­ zontal graduated circle a having its zero on the longitudinal axis of the craft and an arc of a vertical circle b which can slide round the circle a, the circles a, b being universally suspended by members m from a support s secured to the aircraft. The are b carries slidable sights c1, c2, and a vertical rod v1 passing through the centre of the circle a and journaled at its lower end in the are b has at its upper end a sight v. I n using th e device th e are b is turne d until i t is parallel to the apparent direction of movement of objects on th e ground, and the drift angle is the n read off on the circle a. If the altitude is known the ground speed can be determined b y noting the time at which an object on the ground is in line with the rod v, and the time a t which it reaches the sighting line vcl or vc2. The n if the air speed is known, the wind speed an d direction are obtained by constructing a vecto r triangle, of which two sides represent air speed and ground speed and the angle * The abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, price one shilling each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1930

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