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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office These abstracts of British Patent Specifications arc taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 2s. 8d. each. 623,322. Rotary-wing aircraft. Soc. Nationalc dc spar 1 may be connected to a root member 23 by a Constructions Aeronautiqucs du Nord. April 29, welded sleeve 17 and lock-nuts 18, 20. 1947, No. 11,494. Convention date Nov. 14, 1946. 623,684. Assembly jigs. Parsons Industries, Inc. (Class 4.) tionship on a tubular support which is expanded on May 12, 1947, No. 12,807. Convention date June 3, A blade for a rotary wing system comprises a spar, both sides of each rib by internally applied fluid 1946. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXII.) pressure. An aircraft component consists of tubular metal skin and a scries of shaping members extending A jig for use in assembling the components of a heli­ spar members a on which arc threaded in spatial rela­ between the leading and trailing edges, at least two of copter rotor blade comprises a base 38, end supports tionship apertured rib members c rigidly secured to these members being separable to press the others into 40, 46 for carrying the ends of the spar 60, inter­ the spars by expanding the latter on both sides of each engagement with each other and with the metal skin. mediate supports 68 to prevent sagging of the spar, rib. The spar expander tool comprises two co-axially and upright standards 72 for positioning the ribs 87. arranged perforated tubes, the outer tube e being a As shown in FIG. 2, the ends of the supports 68 arc sliding fit in the spar tube a and capable of sliding on formed with arcuate bearing surfaces 70 for the spar, the inner tube/which is provided at one end with a and are aligned by means of a wire 101, TIG. 1, carry­ closing ply # and at the other end with a union // for ing a bead 105 which passes through holes in the connexion to a source of fluid pressure. centres of disks 103 placed on the surfaces 70. The sup­ ports 68 and standards 72 may be aligned by a wire 625,033. Helicopters. Bristol Aeroplane Co. Ltd., 109. Each of the standards comprises a notched plate and Hafner, R. May 30, 1946, No. 16,482. (Class 4.) 76 for the reception of a rib 87, the plates being mov­ (Also in Group XXXII.) able along arcuate slots 84 to facilitate their position­ In a sustaining rotor in which the blades arc ing when it is desired to impart twist to any portion of mounted for flapping, lagging and pitch changing the blade. The outer skin 116 is secured by adhesive movements, and are connected together to maintain a to the edges of the ribs 87, suitably shaped pads 128, substantially symmetrical relationship during rotation, nc . 7, carried by arms 120 and locked by members the connecting members incorporating vibration dam­ 124 pressing the skin into contact with the ribs. The pers, the connecting members consist of tic-bars ex­ base 38 of the jig is carried on a tubular member 20 tending between the root-end members of adjacent capable of being rotated about its longitudinal axis by a hand wheel 36 operating worm gearing 28, 32, TIG. 2, in order to adjust the inclination of the jig to the floor. 623,885. Aircraft wings. Makhonine, J. May 28, 1947, No. 14,210. Convention date July 2, 1946. Drawings to Specification. (Class 4.) The deflexion of aircraft wings is reduced in flight by mounting inside or outside each wing masses cap­ able of spanwise movement located adjacent to the wing tips during flight and adjacent to the under­ carriage during landing and take-off. In one embodi­ In the form of blade shown in riGS.2and 3 two formers ment, fuel tanks may be located in the afore­ 2, 3, are provided in front of the tubular spar 1, while mentioned positions on each wing, the fuel being the rear portion of the blade consists of ribs 5 in­ pumped from one tank to the other to achieve a span- tegral with a trailing edge member 7, to which the wise movement of mass. In a second embodiment rear edges of the covering skin 9 are secured. The solid weights are movable along each wing from an members 2, 3 are pressed apart by screws 11, 12 so outboard to an inboard position. that the member 2 and ribs 5 arc forced against the 623,910. Aircraft framework. Faircy Aviation Co. skin 9. The ends of the screws 11, 12 arc made flush Ltd., and Vines, A. May 27, 1947, No. 14,106. (Class with the leading edge of the blade after adjustment of 4.) (Also in Group XXII.) the members 2, 3. In the modification shown in riG. 5, an inflatable tube 24 is used to separate the leading Structures, such as aircraft components, arc formed edge members 2, 3. As shown in FIG. 4 the end of the by arranging apcrturcd rib members in spaced rela­ blades, the blades being mounted on the root mem­ bers so as to be adjustable in pitch. In the arrange­ ment illustrated, adjacent blades 6 are connected by tic-rods 21 incorporating rubber vibration dampers 27, the ball ends 28 of the tie-rods engaging sockets formed in lugs 20 projecting from the blade elements 15 of the drag hinges. The tic-rods comprise telescopic tubes 22, 23 to which arc secured flanges 25, 26 be­ tween which the rubber disks 27 are disposed. Instead of rubber disks, springs or hydraulic vibration dam­ pers may be used. Blade pitch control is effected by a spider 30, which is tilted by a vertical shaft passing through the centre of the rotor hub and carried by a universal joint. Stops to limit flapping movements of the blades may be provided as described in Specifica­ tion 612,686. 625,342. Aerofoils. Matheson, A. G. May 12, 1947, No. 12,734. (Class 4.) A supersonic cambered or uncambered lifting or control surface aerofoil has the section shown in which the leading surfaces C, F and the trailing sur­ faces D, G arc cither flat or curved, the upper surfaces C, D and the lower surfaces F, G being connected by surfaces E, H respectively, each having a mean radius of curvature smaller than the radii of curvature of the leading and trailing surfaces which they con­ nect. A wing structural member may be located at the position of maximum depth between the surfaces E,H . October 1952 323 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 24 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032222
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Abstract

These abstracts of British Patent Specifications arc taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 2s. 8d. each. 623,322. Rotary-wing aircraft. Soc. Nationalc dc spar 1 may be connected to a root member 23 by a Constructions Aeronautiqucs du Nord. April 29, welded sleeve 17 and lock-nuts 18, 20. 1947, No. 11,494. Convention date Nov. 14, 1946. 623,684. Assembly jigs. Parsons Industries, Inc. (Class 4.) tionship on a tubular support which is expanded on May 12, 1947, No. 12,807. Convention date June 3, A blade for a rotary wing system comprises a spar, both sides of each rib by internally applied fluid 1946. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXII.) pressure. An aircraft component consists of tubular metal skin and a scries of shaping members extending A jig for use in assembling the components of a heli­ spar members a on which arc threaded in spatial rela­ between the leading and trailing edges, at least two of copter rotor blade comprises a base 38, end supports tionship apertured rib members c rigidly secured to these members being separable to press the others into 40, 46 for carrying the ends of the spar 60, inter­ the spars by expanding the latter on both sides of each engagement with each other and with the metal skin. mediate supports 68 to prevent sagging of the spar, rib. The spar expander tool comprises two co-axially and upright standards 72 for positioning the ribs 87. arranged perforated tubes, the outer tube e being a As shown in FIG. 2, the ends of the supports 68 arc sliding fit in the spar tube a and capable of sliding on formed with arcuate bearing surfaces 70 for the spar, the inner tube/which is provided at one end with a and are aligned by means of a wire 101, TIG. 1, carry­ closing ply # and at the other end with a union // for ing a bead 105 which passes through holes in the connexion to a source of fluid pressure. centres of disks 103 placed on the surfaces 70. The sup­ ports 68 and standards 72 may be aligned by a wire 625,033. Helicopters. Bristol Aeroplane Co. Ltd., 109. Each of the standards comprises a notched plate and Hafner, R. May 30, 1946, No. 16,482. (Class 4.) 76 for the reception of a rib 87, the plates being mov­ (Also in Group XXXII.) able along arcuate slots 84 to facilitate their position­ In a sustaining rotor in which the blades arc ing when it is desired to impart twist to any portion of mounted for flapping, lagging and pitch changing the blade. The outer skin 116 is secured by adhesive movements, and are connected together to maintain a to the edges of the ribs 87, suitably shaped pads 128, substantially symmetrical relationship during rotation, nc . 7, carried by arms 120 and locked by members the connecting members incorporating vibration dam­ 124 pressing the skin into contact with the ribs. The pers, the connecting members consist of tic-bars ex­ base 38 of the jig is carried on a tubular member 20 tending between the root-end members of adjacent capable of being rotated about its longitudinal axis by a hand wheel 36 operating worm gearing 28, 32, TIG. 2, in order to adjust the inclination of the jig to the floor. 623,885. Aircraft wings. Makhonine, J. May 28, 1947, No. 14,210. Convention date July 2, 1946. Drawings to Specification. (Class 4.) The deflexion of aircraft wings is reduced in flight by mounting inside or outside each wing masses cap­ able of spanwise movement located adjacent to the wing tips during flight and adjacent to the under­ carriage during landing and take-off. In one embodi­ In the form of blade shown in riGS.2and 3 two formers ment, fuel tanks may be located in the afore­ 2, 3, are provided in front of the tubular spar 1, while mentioned positions on each wing, the fuel being the rear portion of the blade consists of ribs 5 in­ pumped from one tank to the other to achieve a span- tegral with a trailing edge member 7, to which the wise movement of mass. In a second embodiment rear edges of the covering skin 9 are secured. The solid weights are movable along each wing from an members 2, 3 are pressed apart by screws 11, 12 so outboard to an inboard position. that the member 2 and ribs 5 arc forced against the 623,910. Aircraft framework. Faircy Aviation Co. skin 9. The ends of the screws 11, 12 arc made flush Ltd., and Vines, A. May 27, 1947, No. 14,106. (Class with the leading edge of the blade after adjustment of 4.) (Also in Group XXII.) the members 2, 3. In the modification shown in riG. 5, an inflatable tube 24 is used to separate the leading Structures, such as aircraft components, arc formed edge members 2, 3. As shown in FIG. 4 the end of the by arranging apcrturcd rib members in spaced rela­ blades, the blades being mounted on the root mem­ bers so as to be adjustable in pitch. In the arrange­ ment illustrated, adjacent blades 6 are connected by tic-rods 21 incorporating rubber vibration dampers 27, the ball ends 28 of the tie-rods engaging sockets formed in lugs 20 projecting from the blade elements 15 of the drag hinges. The tic-rods comprise telescopic tubes 22, 23 to which arc secured flanges 25, 26 be­ tween which the rubber disks 27 are disposed. Instead of rubber disks, springs or hydraulic vibration dam­ pers may be used. Blade pitch control is effected by a spider 30, which is tilted by a vertical shaft passing through the centre of the rotor hub and carried by a universal joint. Stops to limit flapping movements of the blades may be provided as described in Specifica­ tion 612,686. 625,342. Aerofoils. Matheson, A. G. May 12, 1947, No. 12,734. (Class 4.) A supersonic cambered or uncambered lifting or control surface aerofoil has the section shown in which the leading surfaces C, F and the trailing sur­ faces D, G arc cither flat or curved, the upper surfaces C, D and the lower surfaces F, G being connected by surfaces E, H respectively, each having a mean radius of curvature smaller than the radii of curvature of the leading and trailing surfaces which they con­ nect. A wing structural member may be located at the position of maximum depth between the surfaces E,H . October 1952 323

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1952

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