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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office of a rocket, one or more flaps or equivalent drag members 7 on the underside of the cockpit arc ex­ Month in the Patent Office tended, preferably automatically, into the airstrcam. Such members are additional to the means provided to ensure directional and longitudinal stability of the These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official cockpit after separation from the fuselage. specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton 702,531. Jet propulsion plant. Office National Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. d'Etudes ct de Rccherches Aeronautiques (O.N.E.R.A.). Application in France November 21, 701,504. Powered controls. Northrop Aircraft Inc. 701,842. Air brakes. The English Electric Co. Ltd. Application April 3, 1951. Application in U.S.A. April 27, 1948. A fully power-operated control system, shown in An air brake consists of upper and lower sets of FIG. 1 applied to the clcvons of a tailless aircraft, in­ fingers 10 which are projected and retracted longitu­ dinally through slots in the wing surfaces 8', 8" by cludes a hydraulic actuator 65, 70 which is rendered double-armed levers 6 on a common torque tube 1 irreversible under air loads transmitted from the connected to an actuator 3. The fingers are arranged control surface by arranging that in the neutral posi­ tion of the control valve 64 the actuator is pre-loaded by balanced hydraulic forces acting on opposite sides of the actuator piston. The valve 64 is mounted on the actuator cylinder 65, and is operated by a spring- loaded rod 61 moved by a pilot-actuated arm 60 A turbo-jet engine is arranged to furnish a braking through a control cable 12. In the neutral position thrust by providing a valve 4, the longitudinal dis­ the valve 64 permits the entry of liquid at half the placement of which diverts part of the air from the normal working pressure to both ends of the cylinder compressors 2, 2a into auxiliary combustion chambers 65, thus locking the piston and control surface, move­ C discharging through forwardly-dircctcd nozzles J ment of the rod 61 operating the valve to permit normally closed by a flap 10. During normal operation the valve 4 engages a resilient gas-tight seal in the delivery conduit from the compressors. To obtain maximum air flow the pressure drop across the turbine is increased by varying the outlet area of the main nozzle 1 by axial adjustment of the tail cone \a, and water may be injected into the main combustion chambers 6 to compensate for the reduced flow of gas when the braking jets are in use. 702,533. Power-operated controls. Vickcrs-Arm- strongs Ltd. Application December 12, 1950. In a power-operated control system (FIG. 6) simula­ ted feel is transmitted to the control column 12 from a piston 14 subjected to the dynamic pressure of the air­ strcam by a linkage including two bell-crank lever arms 15,16 connected by an extensible link 22 permitting the angle between the arms to be adjusted to vary the trim of the control surface 10. As shown in FIG. 7 the link 22 includes two sets of interleaved plates 25, 26 which arc normally locked together by compression springs 29 on bolts 28, but which may be released by rocker arms 32 controlled by a master lever 35 operated by a hand lever 38 on the control column 12 through a flexible cable 37. To vary the trim the pilot releases the plates 25, 26 with the control column in the desired new datum position, to permit the neces­ sary extension or contraction of the link 22, and then re-locks the plates. liquid at full pressure to flow to one end only of the cylinder 65 to move the surface. The follow-up move­ 702,981. Aircraft structures. L. C. Heal. Applica­ ment of the casing of the valve 64 consequent upon tion October 26, 1948. the movement of the surface returns the valve to the in groups between consecutive wing ribs 2, each group ■ A streamlined structure such as a fuselage or hull neutral position to lock the surface in its displaced being connected to longitudinal members 7 extending is formed from tapering flat plates a, b, FIG. 8, pro­ position. The rod 61 is spring-loaded in both direc­ between pairs of the arms 6, which are coupled by vided with stiffencrs a1, a6, bl, Z>5 along their longi­ tions to ensure that only a safe load is applied to the braces 16 relieving the tube 1 from stress. The fingers tudinal edges, the plates being bent to the desired valve in the event of the pilot's rate of control move­ bear against rollers 11 carried by brackets 12 adjacent transverse and longitudinal curvatures in a jig and ment exceeding the rate of response of the actuator. the wing slots. their longitudinal edges secured together while in the stressed condition. As shown in FIG. 9 the edge stif­ 702,148. Jettisonable cockpits. Blackburn and fencrs may be shaped to intcrengage and form General Aircraft Ltd. Application, January 23, 1951. longerons, fabric o,u being clamped between base To balance the aerodynamic pitching moment due strips a", a". Transverse stiffeners a" are secured to to drag of the canopy 6 when the cockpit unit 1 is the edge stiffeners while the plates arc assembled in separated from the fuselage 2, for example, by means the jig. In forming a circular-section fuselage the wide ends of the strips a, b are secured to a ring-frame at the section of maximum diameter, their other ends being secured to spun nose and tail fairings. April \95A 135 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 26 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1954

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032418
Publisher site
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Abstract

of a rocket, one or more flaps or equivalent drag members 7 on the underside of the cockpit arc ex­ Month in the Patent Office tended, preferably automatically, into the airstrcam. Such members are additional to the means provided to ensure directional and longitudinal stability of the These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official cockpit after separation from the fuselage. specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton 702,531. Jet propulsion plant. Office National Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. d'Etudes ct de Rccherches Aeronautiques (O.N.E.R.A.). Application in France November 21, 701,504. Powered controls. Northrop Aircraft Inc. 701,842. Air brakes. The English Electric Co. Ltd. Application April 3, 1951. Application in U.S.A. April 27, 1948. A fully power-operated control system, shown in An air brake consists of upper and lower sets of FIG. 1 applied to the clcvons of a tailless aircraft, in­ fingers 10 which are projected and retracted longitu­ dinally through slots in the wing surfaces 8', 8" by cludes a hydraulic actuator 65, 70 which is rendered double-armed levers 6 on a common torque tube 1 irreversible under air loads transmitted from the connected to an actuator 3. The fingers are arranged control surface by arranging that in the neutral posi­ tion of the control valve 64 the actuator is pre-loaded by balanced hydraulic forces acting on opposite sides of the actuator piston. The valve 64 is mounted on the actuator cylinder 65, and is operated by a spring- loaded rod 61 moved by a pilot-actuated arm 60 A turbo-jet engine is arranged to furnish a braking through a control cable 12. In the neutral position thrust by providing a valve 4, the longitudinal dis­ the valve 64 permits the entry of liquid at half the placement of which diverts part of the air from the normal working pressure to both ends of the cylinder compressors 2, 2a into auxiliary combustion chambers 65, thus locking the piston and control surface, move­ C discharging through forwardly-dircctcd nozzles J ment of the rod 61 operating the valve to permit normally closed by a flap 10. During normal operation the valve 4 engages a resilient gas-tight seal in the delivery conduit from the compressors. To obtain maximum air flow the pressure drop across the turbine is increased by varying the outlet area of the main nozzle 1 by axial adjustment of the tail cone \a, and water may be injected into the main combustion chambers 6 to compensate for the reduced flow of gas when the braking jets are in use. 702,533. Power-operated controls. Vickcrs-Arm- strongs Ltd. Application December 12, 1950. In a power-operated control system (FIG. 6) simula­ ted feel is transmitted to the control column 12 from a piston 14 subjected to the dynamic pressure of the air­ strcam by a linkage including two bell-crank lever arms 15,16 connected by an extensible link 22 permitting the angle between the arms to be adjusted to vary the trim of the control surface 10. As shown in FIG. 7 the link 22 includes two sets of interleaved plates 25, 26 which arc normally locked together by compression springs 29 on bolts 28, but which may be released by rocker arms 32 controlled by a master lever 35 operated by a hand lever 38 on the control column 12 through a flexible cable 37. To vary the trim the pilot releases the plates 25, 26 with the control column in the desired new datum position, to permit the neces­ sary extension or contraction of the link 22, and then re-locks the plates. liquid at full pressure to flow to one end only of the cylinder 65 to move the surface. The follow-up move­ 702,981. Aircraft structures. L. C. Heal. Applica­ ment of the casing of the valve 64 consequent upon tion October 26, 1948. the movement of the surface returns the valve to the in groups between consecutive wing ribs 2, each group ■ A streamlined structure such as a fuselage or hull neutral position to lock the surface in its displaced being connected to longitudinal members 7 extending is formed from tapering flat plates a, b, FIG. 8, pro­ position. The rod 61 is spring-loaded in both direc­ between pairs of the arms 6, which are coupled by vided with stiffencrs a1, a6, bl, Z>5 along their longi­ tions to ensure that only a safe load is applied to the braces 16 relieving the tube 1 from stress. The fingers tudinal edges, the plates being bent to the desired valve in the event of the pilot's rate of control move­ bear against rollers 11 carried by brackets 12 adjacent transverse and longitudinal curvatures in a jig and ment exceeding the rate of response of the actuator. the wing slots. their longitudinal edges secured together while in the stressed condition. As shown in FIG. 9 the edge stif­ 702,148. Jettisonable cockpits. Blackburn and fencrs may be shaped to intcrengage and form General Aircraft Ltd. Application, January 23, 1951. longerons, fabric o,u being clamped between base To balance the aerodynamic pitching moment due strips a", a". Transverse stiffeners a" are secured to to drag of the canopy 6 when the cockpit unit 1 is the edge stiffeners while the plates arc assembled in separated from the fuselage 2, for example, by means the jig. In forming a circular-section fuselage the wide ends of the strips a, b are secured to a ring-frame at the section of maximum diameter, their other ends being secured to spun nose and tail fairings. April \95A 135

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1954

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