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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office as the tailplane 5. The latter are coated with a heat- resistant material. These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each. 601,034. Rotary-wing Aircraft. Fairey Aviation 6 backed by a heat-insulating covering 14, the gases Co. Ltd., and J. A. J. Bennett. July 12, 1945, No. finally escaping through apertures 8 in the wing ribs 17,833. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXXII.) and openings 9 situated in a region of reduced pres­ In a rotary wing aircraft having two or more rotor sure. The skin 5 is secured to the nose ribs and spaced blades either rigidly mounted or mounted on con­ from the partition by beading strips 11. The tube 1 601,829. Parachutes. Cambridge Instrument Co. ventional flapping hinges and/or drag hinges, each is secured to the ribs by clamps 4, and its cross- Ltd., and W. J. Stallan. Oct. 4, 1945, No. 25,879. blade is provided with one or more auxiliary masses so section and the diameter and distribution of the (Class 4.) mounted on pivots attached to the blade as to con­ orifices 3 may vary along the span. stitute one or more small vibratory systems tuned to twice the frequency of the rotor. As shown, the blades 601,584. Aircraft Undercarriages. P. E. Mercier j of a two-bladed rotor are mounted by means of Jan. 15, 1943, No. 808. (Class 4.) (Also in Group hinges k inclined to the plane of rotation, and are pro­ XXIV.) vided with auxiliary masses m hinged about axes In a twin-tyred castoring undercarriage wheel, as M-M. The restoring force on each mass is provided by described in Specification 548,067, the two wheel por­ the component of centrifugal force at right angles to tions are coupled together through a slipping friction the axis M-M. According to the Provisional Specifica­ clutch which, while preventing shimmy, does not ren­ Rip-cord operating mechanism for parachutes com­ tion, the mass provided for counter-balancing a single- der steering too difficult. In the form shown, each prises means, preferably adjustable, to delay operation bladed rotor may be located on an arm attached to wheel rim 39 is coupled to the main axle 28 through automatically for a pre-determined period of time the blade by flapping and/or 'drag' pivots so displaced an end plate 42 splined to a sub-axle 14, a free-wheel after the commencement of a jump, means serving coupling 45, 16 and a friction clutch 17. Each clutch from the axis of rotation that the natural frequency of automatically to render inoperative the delay means may be adjusted by a nut 54 acting through spring ex­ the mass is twice that of the rotor. Alternatively, the until a predetermined minimum, and preferably ad­ pansion washers 52. A central disk brake operated by rotor blade may be mounted on a pivot so inclined to justable, height above ground is attained in the event inflatable tubes 35 is provided, openings being pro­ of a jump originating at a height exceeding the mini­ the longitudinal axis of the blade and/or the rotational vided in the front and rear of the brake casing to mum height, and means enabling operation to be axis, and/or so displaced from the axis of rotation that allow the flow of cooling air in the fore-and-aft performed in the normal manner by the wearer, if the natural frequency of motion of the blade about the pivot is twice that of the rotor. direction. conscious. 601,086. Preventing Formation of Ice on Aircraft. 601,724. Aircraft. Aerojet Engineering Corpora­ 601,999. Controlling Aircraft. Sperry Gyroscope Soc. Nationale de Constructions Aeronautiques du tion. May 23, 1944, No. 9,979. Convention date May Co. Inc. July 2, 1945, No. 16,843. Convention date Sud-Est. Oct. 19, 1945, No. 27603. Convention date 29, 1943. (Class 4.) (Also in Groups XII and XXVI.) June 30, 1944. (Class 4.) Oct. 3, 1944. (Class 4.)* An aircraft 1 has motors 11 (see also Groups XII and A controller for suppressing irregularity of flight To prevent ice-formation on the leading edge of a XXVI) for use in rocket-assisted take-off, housed in movements in aircraft having rotary wings com­ wing or other aircraft part, hot gases are discharged the same nacelles 53 on the wings 3 as the main en­ prises means (such as a accelerometer producing an through orifices 3 in a thermally insulated tube 1, ex­ gines 9 driving propellers 10. The thrust line Y-Y electric control signal) responsive to sudden move­ tending along the span, and are then guided rear- each jet motor is coincident in plan view with the ments of the aircraft so as to prdouce a control im­ wardly in contact with the inner face of the skin 5 thrust axis of the corresponding propeller, intersects pulse for changing the pitch angle of the wings and through a shallow chamber 7 formed by a partition the transverse axis of the aircraft and is directed thus altering the lifting or propelling power to coun­ siightly downward toward the rear to provide addi­ teract the forces causing deviation of the aircraft from *(See 'The Aérosudest 2010 in Production'. AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ tional lift and to avoid burning the rear surfaces such the normal path. ING, Vol. XIX, July, 1947, at p . 236.—EDITOR.) December 1950 379 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 22 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1950

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031983
Publisher site
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Abstract

as the tailplane 5. The latter are coated with a heat- resistant material. These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each. 601,034. Rotary-wing Aircraft. Fairey Aviation 6 backed by a heat-insulating covering 14, the gases Co. Ltd., and J. A. J. Bennett. July 12, 1945, No. finally escaping through apertures 8 in the wing ribs 17,833. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXXII.) and openings 9 situated in a region of reduced pres­ In a rotary wing aircraft having two or more rotor sure. The skin 5 is secured to the nose ribs and spaced blades either rigidly mounted or mounted on con­ from the partition by beading strips 11. The tube 1 601,829. Parachutes. Cambridge Instrument Co. ventional flapping hinges and/or drag hinges, each is secured to the ribs by clamps 4, and its cross- Ltd., and W. J. Stallan. Oct. 4, 1945, No. 25,879. blade is provided with one or more auxiliary masses so section and the diameter and distribution of the (Class 4.) mounted on pivots attached to the blade as to con­ orifices 3 may vary along the span. stitute one or more small vibratory systems tuned to twice the frequency of the rotor. As shown, the blades 601,584. Aircraft Undercarriages. P. E. Mercier j of a two-bladed rotor are mounted by means of Jan. 15, 1943, No. 808. (Class 4.) (Also in Group hinges k inclined to the plane of rotation, and are pro­ XXIV.) vided with auxiliary masses m hinged about axes In a twin-tyred castoring undercarriage wheel, as M-M. The restoring force on each mass is provided by described in Specification 548,067, the two wheel por­ the component of centrifugal force at right angles to tions are coupled together through a slipping friction the axis M-M. According to the Provisional Specifica­ clutch which, while preventing shimmy, does not ren­ Rip-cord operating mechanism for parachutes com­ tion, the mass provided for counter-balancing a single- der steering too difficult. In the form shown, each prises means, preferably adjustable, to delay operation bladed rotor may be located on an arm attached to wheel rim 39 is coupled to the main axle 28 through automatically for a pre-determined period of time the blade by flapping and/or 'drag' pivots so displaced an end plate 42 splined to a sub-axle 14, a free-wheel after the commencement of a jump, means serving coupling 45, 16 and a friction clutch 17. Each clutch from the axis of rotation that the natural frequency of automatically to render inoperative the delay means may be adjusted by a nut 54 acting through spring ex­ the mass is twice that of the rotor. Alternatively, the until a predetermined minimum, and preferably ad­ pansion washers 52. A central disk brake operated by rotor blade may be mounted on a pivot so inclined to justable, height above ground is attained in the event inflatable tubes 35 is provided, openings being pro­ of a jump originating at a height exceeding the mini­ the longitudinal axis of the blade and/or the rotational vided in the front and rear of the brake casing to mum height, and means enabling operation to be axis, and/or so displaced from the axis of rotation that allow the flow of cooling air in the fore-and-aft performed in the normal manner by the wearer, if the natural frequency of motion of the blade about the pivot is twice that of the rotor. direction. conscious. 601,086. Preventing Formation of Ice on Aircraft. 601,724. Aircraft. Aerojet Engineering Corpora­ 601,999. Controlling Aircraft. Sperry Gyroscope Soc. Nationale de Constructions Aeronautiques du tion. May 23, 1944, No. 9,979. Convention date May Co. Inc. July 2, 1945, No. 16,843. Convention date Sud-Est. Oct. 19, 1945, No. 27603. Convention date 29, 1943. (Class 4.) (Also in Groups XII and XXVI.) June 30, 1944. (Class 4.) Oct. 3, 1944. (Class 4.)* An aircraft 1 has motors 11 (see also Groups XII and A controller for suppressing irregularity of flight To prevent ice-formation on the leading edge of a XXVI) for use in rocket-assisted take-off, housed in movements in aircraft having rotary wings com­ wing or other aircraft part, hot gases are discharged the same nacelles 53 on the wings 3 as the main en­ prises means (such as a accelerometer producing an through orifices 3 in a thermally insulated tube 1, ex­ gines 9 driving propellers 10. The thrust line Y-Y electric control signal) responsive to sudden move­ tending along the span, and are then guided rear- each jet motor is coincident in plan view with the ments of the aircraft so as to prdouce a control im­ wardly in contact with the inner face of the skin 5 thrust axis of the corresponding propeller, intersects pulse for changing the pitch angle of the wings and through a shallow chamber 7 formed by a partition the transverse axis of the aircraft and is directed thus altering the lifting or propelling power to coun­ siightly downward toward the rear to provide addi­ teract the forces causing deviation of the aircraft from *(See 'The Aérosudest 2010 in Production'. AIRCRAFT ENGINEER­ tional lift and to avoid burning the rear surfaces such the normal path. ING, Vol. XIX, July, 1947, at p . 236.—EDITOR.) December 1950 379

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1950

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