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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office piston to the other when the piston valve 44 is closed. An accumulator 51 is provided to maintain Month in the Patent Office the system full of liquid, the accumulator being charged by the reciprocating action of an extension 44b of the valve 44. Relief valves 66, 67 permit passage These abstracts of British Patent Specifications arc taken, by permission, from the officially prepared of liquid from the accumulator to the supply tank 18 abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, in the event of excessive pressure occurring due to 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies rise of temperature. In the case of a surface fitted with a balance tab, movement of the pilot's control of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each member is first applied to the tab, sufficient to cause opening of the locking piston control valve 44. 608,693. Controlling aircraft. C. D. Watson and initial operation of the pilot's control and the locking A. R. Collar. Feb. 27, 1946, No. 6,128. (Class 4.) of the control surface, dependent partly on the amount 609,013. Aircraft controls. Fairey Aviation Co., and rate of movement of the pilot's actuating member. A control system for a control surface, including a Ltd., H. E. Chaplin and F. J. Costigan. May 14, 1946, As illustrated, twin rudders 1, 2 arc moved by servo pivoted tab for assisting movement thereof is provided No. 14,538. (Class 4.) with means for automatically substantially completely tabs 3, 4, operated by links 10, 11 from the pilot's Controlling means for high-speed aircraft com­ hydraulically locking the control surface in any control member through rods 5, 7. The rudders are prises a pair of wings 11, 12, hingedly mounted about a position of adjustment at the instant when aero­ locked in their adjusted position by a piston 12d transverse axis X—X, passing approxmately through dynamic balance is attained between the surface and moving in a hydraulic cylinder, the liquid flow being the centre of pressure of each wing, and operating tab, a variable time lag being introduced between the controlled by a valve 15, shown as a separate unit means for each wing, to move it about its hinge to from the cylinder in no . 1, but combined therewith in vary its incidence, interconnected with a pilot's FIG. 2. The control member 5, FIG. 1, or 7, FIG. 2a, is control 20. Forwardly-placed pins 17 project inwardly coupled to a piston-rod 21a, the piston 21 of which from each wing into inclined slots in members 19, moves in a cylinder 22 filled with liquid, and the ends which are each longitudinally traversed under the of which carry sleeves 28, 29 enclosing compression pilot's control to vary the incidence of the wings by springs 26, 27. Upon operation of the pilot's control raising or lowering the pins 17. Power is applied to member to move the control member 7, FIG. 2a, in the members 19 through a T-shaped lever 36 connected direction of the arrow A, the piston 21 and cylinder 22 through hydraulic servo means 38, 40, 41, as described move the sleeve 29 into contact with a member 32 in Specification 607, 321 (Group XXIX), which connected to a lever 46, which opens a piston valve 44 produce a sense of 'feel' at the pilot's control 20 which to establish communication between conduits 12f, 12g, is connected to lever 36 by two separate linkages, and thus allow movement of the piston 12d in its respectively, including T-shaped levers 21, 22. Lever cylinder under the influence of the rudders 1, 2. 36 has its cross-member mounted on a pivot 37, about Upon contact of the sleeve 29 with the abutment 32 which it can be turned for differential action on the spring 27 is compressed, the amount of com­ members 19; the pivot 37 is mounted in guides to pression being dependent upon the amount of move­ allow the lever 36 to be moved forwardly or rear- ment of the member 7 and also upon the rate of leak­ wardly for exerting like actions on the two members age of liquid past the piston 21, the latter of which is 19. The lever 21, which is actuated by transverse determined by the rate of movement of the member 7. movements of control lever 20, turns on pivot 25, The spring 27 expands while the rudders arc moving to extending into a slot in the cross-member of the lever their adjusted position until, when aerodynamic 21, and through linkage 32 .. . 35 turns lever 36 about balance is obtained between them and the tabs 3, 4 its pivot 37 for differential action on the wings. At the piston 21 reaches its central position in the cylinder the other end of the cross-member of lever 21 from 22, and the sleeve 29 moves out of contact with the linkage member 32 is pivoted a link 44 connected to member 32 to close the valve 44. This prevents flow of ailerons for low-speed control. In the position of liquid from one side to the other of the piston 12d, pivot 25 the high-speed and low-speed controls are which is thereupon locked and holds the both exerted by turning lever 21; as the speed in­ rudders in their adjusted position. To accom­ creases, pressure from a pitot-tube 26e moves pivot 25 modate any errors which may arise due to the towards link 44 so that finally only the high-speed hydraulic lock becoming effective slightly control is exerted. T-shaped lever 22 for exerting like before or after aerodynamic balance of the actions on the wings, turns on movable pivot 26 to rudders is obtained, or due to change of speed produce longitudinal movement of lever 36 through or attitude of the aircraft, slow leakage of linkage 45, 46, 47 connected to pivot 37; lever 48 liquid may take place past the piston 12c/. connected to lever 22 is used to actuate the elevators In addition, an adjustable valve 49 allows for low-speed control as well as the wings 11, 12 in the transfer of liquid from one side of the shown position of the pivot 26, which is adjusted similarly to pivot 25 by a pitot-tube 26e. 609, 024. Jet propulsion. Soc, Anon. Sebac. Dec. 8, 1938, No. 35,815. Convention date, Dec. 10, 1937. (Class 4.) In a device for propelling a body by discharging pressure fluid into a medium at lower pressure as described, e.g. in Specification 456,063, the deviating portion of the wall is formed by successive surface elements M, Ml, M2 arranged at predetermined angles to one another and starting from a point behind the outlet of the slot, the angles, the lengths of the elements and the distance of the starting point behind the outlet of the slot being chosen in accord­ ance with the ratio of the pressure of the fluid to be discharged, the section of the slot and the nature of the fluid. Deviation of the whole of the gaseous stream is ensured by independent deflector elements June 1951 185 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 23 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1951

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032052
Publisher site
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Abstract

piston to the other when the piston valve 44 is closed. An accumulator 51 is provided to maintain Month in the Patent Office the system full of liquid, the accumulator being charged by the reciprocating action of an extension 44b of the valve 44. Relief valves 66, 67 permit passage These abstracts of British Patent Specifications arc taken, by permission, from the officially prepared of liquid from the accumulator to the supply tank 18 abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, in the event of excessive pressure occurring due to 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies rise of temperature. In the case of a surface fitted with a balance tab, movement of the pilot's control of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each member is first applied to the tab, sufficient to cause opening of the locking piston control valve 44. 608,693. Controlling aircraft. C. D. Watson and initial operation of the pilot's control and the locking A. R. Collar. Feb. 27, 1946, No. 6,128. (Class 4.) of the control surface, dependent partly on the amount 609,013. Aircraft controls. Fairey Aviation Co., and rate of movement of the pilot's actuating member. A control system for a control surface, including a Ltd., H. E. Chaplin and F. J. Costigan. May 14, 1946, As illustrated, twin rudders 1, 2 arc moved by servo pivoted tab for assisting movement thereof is provided No. 14,538. (Class 4.) with means for automatically substantially completely tabs 3, 4, operated by links 10, 11 from the pilot's Controlling means for high-speed aircraft com­ hydraulically locking the control surface in any control member through rods 5, 7. The rudders are prises a pair of wings 11, 12, hingedly mounted about a position of adjustment at the instant when aero­ locked in their adjusted position by a piston 12d transverse axis X—X, passing approxmately through dynamic balance is attained between the surface and moving in a hydraulic cylinder, the liquid flow being the centre of pressure of each wing, and operating tab, a variable time lag being introduced between the controlled by a valve 15, shown as a separate unit means for each wing, to move it about its hinge to from the cylinder in no . 1, but combined therewith in vary its incidence, interconnected with a pilot's FIG. 2. The control member 5, FIG. 1, or 7, FIG. 2a, is control 20. Forwardly-placed pins 17 project inwardly coupled to a piston-rod 21a, the piston 21 of which from each wing into inclined slots in members 19, moves in a cylinder 22 filled with liquid, and the ends which are each longitudinally traversed under the of which carry sleeves 28, 29 enclosing compression pilot's control to vary the incidence of the wings by springs 26, 27. Upon operation of the pilot's control raising or lowering the pins 17. Power is applied to member to move the control member 7, FIG. 2a, in the members 19 through a T-shaped lever 36 connected direction of the arrow A, the piston 21 and cylinder 22 through hydraulic servo means 38, 40, 41, as described move the sleeve 29 into contact with a member 32 in Specification 607, 321 (Group XXIX), which connected to a lever 46, which opens a piston valve 44 produce a sense of 'feel' at the pilot's control 20 which to establish communication between conduits 12f, 12g, is connected to lever 36 by two separate linkages, and thus allow movement of the piston 12d in its respectively, including T-shaped levers 21, 22. Lever cylinder under the influence of the rudders 1, 2. 36 has its cross-member mounted on a pivot 37, about Upon contact of the sleeve 29 with the abutment 32 which it can be turned for differential action on the spring 27 is compressed, the amount of com­ members 19; the pivot 37 is mounted in guides to pression being dependent upon the amount of move­ allow the lever 36 to be moved forwardly or rear- ment of the member 7 and also upon the rate of leak­ wardly for exerting like actions on the two members age of liquid past the piston 21, the latter of which is 19. The lever 21, which is actuated by transverse determined by the rate of movement of the member 7. movements of control lever 20, turns on pivot 25, The spring 27 expands while the rudders arc moving to extending into a slot in the cross-member of the lever their adjusted position until, when aerodynamic 21, and through linkage 32 .. . 35 turns lever 36 about balance is obtained between them and the tabs 3, 4 its pivot 37 for differential action on the wings. At the piston 21 reaches its central position in the cylinder the other end of the cross-member of lever 21 from 22, and the sleeve 29 moves out of contact with the linkage member 32 is pivoted a link 44 connected to member 32 to close the valve 44. This prevents flow of ailerons for low-speed control. In the position of liquid from one side to the other of the piston 12d, pivot 25 the high-speed and low-speed controls are which is thereupon locked and holds the both exerted by turning lever 21; as the speed in­ rudders in their adjusted position. To accom­ creases, pressure from a pitot-tube 26e moves pivot 25 modate any errors which may arise due to the towards link 44 so that finally only the high-speed hydraulic lock becoming effective slightly control is exerted. T-shaped lever 22 for exerting like before or after aerodynamic balance of the actions on the wings, turns on movable pivot 26 to rudders is obtained, or due to change of speed produce longitudinal movement of lever 36 through or attitude of the aircraft, slow leakage of linkage 45, 46, 47 connected to pivot 37; lever 48 liquid may take place past the piston 12c/. connected to lever 22 is used to actuate the elevators In addition, an adjustable valve 49 allows for low-speed control as well as the wings 11, 12 in the transfer of liquid from one side of the shown position of the pivot 26, which is adjusted similarly to pivot 25 by a pitot-tube 26e. 609, 024. Jet propulsion. Soc, Anon. Sebac. Dec. 8, 1938, No. 35,815. Convention date, Dec. 10, 1937. (Class 4.) In a device for propelling a body by discharging pressure fluid into a medium at lower pressure as described, e.g. in Specification 456,063, the deviating portion of the wall is formed by successive surface elements M, Ml, M2 arranged at predetermined angles to one another and starting from a point behind the outlet of the slot, the angles, the lengths of the elements and the distance of the starting point behind the outlet of the slot being chosen in accord­ ance with the ratio of the pressure of the fluid to be discharged, the section of the slot and the nature of the fluid. Deviation of the whole of the gaseous stream is ensured by independent deflector elements June 1951 185

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1951

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