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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 104 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING April, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 412,593 . Retractable undercarriages. Comper Aircraft Co., Ltd., and Comper, N., Heston Airport, Hounslow, Middlesex. Dec. 29, 1932, No. 36815. [Class 4.] A manually or power-operated retractable under­ carriage for aircraft comprises a wheel carried by a frame which can be swung up or down in a sub­ edge of a main control surface 2 and adapted to be stantiall y fore-and-aft direction so tha t it is wholly angularl y adjusted with respect thereto by means, or substantially wholly retractable within the independen t of the control 23, for, and positioned aircraft body or wing, means being provided for t o coincide with the pivot axis of, the control locking the undercarriage in its extended or surface 2 to maintain the surface 4 in its adjusted retracte d position. As shown and adapted for position relatively to the surface 2 for all positions manua l operation, each wheel is carried on an axle of the surface 2. As shown, the controls for the mounted between two rigid frames 2, 3, 4, the surface 4 comprise cables 42, 43 connected to king member s 2 of which incorporate a shock absorber, post s 41, guided by a fairlead 44 situated at the th e frames being braced apart by members 5, 9 and pivot axis, e.g. of the rudder 2, and extending 9x. The member 5 is telescoped over and secured forwards to a windlass 46 controlled by the pilot. to a tube 6 extending through the aircraft wing and is mounted for rotation by a hand lever 20, a link 19 and a lever 18 in brackets 7, so that the two 413,349 . Propelling aircraft. Bristol Aero­ wheels of the aircraft may be swung upwards or plan e Co., Ltd., Fedden, A. H. R., and Owner, downwards together. The frames are locked in F . M., Filton House, Bristol. Jan. 14, 1933, No. th e extended or retracted position by spring- 412,232 . Aircraft wings . Vickers (Aviation), 1314. [Class 4.] pressed bolts 10 housed in the members 9 and Ltd. , and Wallis, B. N., Byfleet Road, Weybridge, A cooling fan 30 of an aircraft engine is coaxially adapte d to engage holes provided in plates 15, 17. Surrey. Dec. 22, 1932, Nos. 36307/32 and arrange d in front of, and rotated at a higher speed Th e bolts are disengaged by actuation of a lever 32879/33 . [Class 4.] than , the propeller 10. As shown, the fan 30 is 21 connected by a Bowden wire to a lever on a An aircraft wing has upper and lower booms driven directly from the main engine shaft 26, extendin g in th e direction of th e span a t th e deepest while the propeller is driven by reduction gear portion of the wing, and two systems of intersecting comprising three planet wheels 22 rotating on stub bracing members arranged with their greater depth axles on the propeller shaft 14, and fixed and normal to the surface and with their neutral axes driving gears 17, 21. The fan may, however, be in geodetic lines, th e members being rigidly secured driven at higher speed than engine speed, and the togethe r at their intersections and also rigidly axis of fan and propeller may be parallel to that of secured to the booms. The upper and lower booms th e crankshaft. The fan may be a radiator fan if ma y be interconnected by Warren bracing or left th e engine is water cooled; if the engine is an air- free to enable an outer section of wing to telescope cooled radial-cylinder engine having a cowling within the inner section. The two systems of ring round the cylinders, the diameter of the circle bracing d, e are in short lengths of channel section swept by the fan is substantially the same as the materia l with the webs normal to the wing surface, diamete r of the cowling-ring. th e ends of the webs being bent and secured to diametrically opposite points of short tubes f 2 , Fig. 8, and the flanges being secured to upper and lower plates f. Where the bracing intersects the booms still shorter members d4, d5, e4, e5 are secured sleeve 14 having helical slots co-operating with to pressed metal pieces g, Fig. 6, slid over the boom pin s 12 on the bolts 10. The wheels may be an d having bent portions g3, g4 secured thereto. actuate d separately and the open end of each Stiffening flutes g5 in the sides of the members g recess for the wheels may be closed by a fairing transmi t the thrust. Where the bracing meets provided on the front members of th e undercarriage th e leading and trailing edges the ends of the units . The fairings may be formed by two flaps member s d, e are received in channel members h, h1, controlled manually or by air pressure and they Fig . 5, connected by Warren bracing and by ma y be mounted on the wing, in which case they vertical plates h2 to which brackets h3 are riveted. ma y hinge or slide. 412,740 . Controlling aircraft. Tower, L. R., an d Boeing Airplane Co., 200, West Michigan Street, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. April 19, 1933, No . 12441. Divided application. [Class 4.] Control means for aircraft comprise an auxiliary control surface 4 mounted on a main control surface 2 and provided with means, distinct from th e means 23 for adjusting the surface 2, to adjust angularly th e surface 4 and adapted so tha t the surface 4 is maintained parallel to its adjusted position, relative t o the longitudinal centre of the aircraft or to a fixed stabilising-surface 20, for all positions of the surface 2. As shown, the surface 4 is adjusted by cables 42, 43 connected to king-posts 41, main­ tained parallel to each other by guides 44 mounted adjacent the pivot for the surface 2 and extending forwardly to a control windlass 46. 413,456 . Controlling aircraft. Tower, L. R., an d Boeing Airplane Co., 200, West Michigan Street, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. April 19, 1933, No. 11486. [Class 4.] Means for controlling aircraft comprise an auxiliary control surface 4 mounted at the trailing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 7 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1935

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029928
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Abstract

104 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING April, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 412,593 . Retractable undercarriages. Comper Aircraft Co., Ltd., and Comper, N., Heston Airport, Hounslow, Middlesex. Dec. 29, 1932, No. 36815. [Class 4.] A manually or power-operated retractable under­ carriage for aircraft comprises a wheel carried by a frame which can be swung up or down in a sub­ edge of a main control surface 2 and adapted to be stantiall y fore-and-aft direction so tha t it is wholly angularl y adjusted with respect thereto by means, or substantially wholly retractable within the independen t of the control 23, for, and positioned aircraft body or wing, means being provided for t o coincide with the pivot axis of, the control locking the undercarriage in its extended or surface 2 to maintain the surface 4 in its adjusted retracte d position. As shown and adapted for position relatively to the surface 2 for all positions manua l operation, each wheel is carried on an axle of the surface 2. As shown, the controls for the mounted between two rigid frames 2, 3, 4, the surface 4 comprise cables 42, 43 connected to king member s 2 of which incorporate a shock absorber, post s 41, guided by a fairlead 44 situated at the th e frames being braced apart by members 5, 9 and pivot axis, e.g. of the rudder 2, and extending 9x. The member 5 is telescoped over and secured forwards to a windlass 46 controlled by the pilot. to a tube 6 extending through the aircraft wing and is mounted for rotation by a hand lever 20, a link 19 and a lever 18 in brackets 7, so that the two 413,349 . Propelling aircraft. Bristol Aero­ wheels of the aircraft may be swung upwards or plan e Co., Ltd., Fedden, A. H. R., and Owner, downwards together. The frames are locked in F . M., Filton House, Bristol. Jan. 14, 1933, No. th e extended or retracted position by spring- 412,232 . Aircraft wings . Vickers (Aviation), 1314. [Class 4.] pressed bolts 10 housed in the members 9 and Ltd. , and Wallis, B. N., Byfleet Road, Weybridge, A cooling fan 30 of an aircraft engine is coaxially adapte d to engage holes provided in plates 15, 17. Surrey. Dec. 22, 1932, Nos. 36307/32 and arrange d in front of, and rotated at a higher speed Th e bolts are disengaged by actuation of a lever 32879/33 . [Class 4.] than , the propeller 10. As shown, the fan 30 is 21 connected by a Bowden wire to a lever on a An aircraft wing has upper and lower booms driven directly from the main engine shaft 26, extendin g in th e direction of th e span a t th e deepest while the propeller is driven by reduction gear portion of the wing, and two systems of intersecting comprising three planet wheels 22 rotating on stub bracing members arranged with their greater depth axles on the propeller shaft 14, and fixed and normal to the surface and with their neutral axes driving gears 17, 21. The fan may, however, be in geodetic lines, th e members being rigidly secured driven at higher speed than engine speed, and the togethe r at their intersections and also rigidly axis of fan and propeller may be parallel to that of secured to the booms. The upper and lower booms th e crankshaft. The fan may be a radiator fan if ma y be interconnected by Warren bracing or left th e engine is water cooled; if the engine is an air- free to enable an outer section of wing to telescope cooled radial-cylinder engine having a cowling within the inner section. The two systems of ring round the cylinders, the diameter of the circle bracing d, e are in short lengths of channel section swept by the fan is substantially the same as the materia l with the webs normal to the wing surface, diamete r of the cowling-ring. th e ends of the webs being bent and secured to diametrically opposite points of short tubes f 2 , Fig. 8, and the flanges being secured to upper and lower plates f. Where the bracing intersects the booms still shorter members d4, d5, e4, e5 are secured sleeve 14 having helical slots co-operating with to pressed metal pieces g, Fig. 6, slid over the boom pin s 12 on the bolts 10. The wheels may be an d having bent portions g3, g4 secured thereto. actuate d separately and the open end of each Stiffening flutes g5 in the sides of the members g recess for the wheels may be closed by a fairing transmi t the thrust. Where the bracing meets provided on the front members of th e undercarriage th e leading and trailing edges the ends of the units . The fairings may be formed by two flaps member s d, e are received in channel members h, h1, controlled manually or by air pressure and they Fig . 5, connected by Warren bracing and by ma y be mounted on the wing, in which case they vertical plates h2 to which brackets h3 are riveted. ma y hinge or slide. 412,740 . Controlling aircraft. Tower, L. R., an d Boeing Airplane Co., 200, West Michigan Street, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. April 19, 1933, No . 12441. Divided application. [Class 4.] Control means for aircraft comprise an auxiliary control surface 4 mounted on a main control surface 2 and provided with means, distinct from th e means 23 for adjusting the surface 2, to adjust angularly th e surface 4 and adapted so tha t the surface 4 is maintained parallel to its adjusted position, relative t o the longitudinal centre of the aircraft or to a fixed stabilising-surface 20, for all positions of the surface 2. As shown, the surface 4 is adjusted by cables 42, 43 connected to king-posts 41, main­ tained parallel to each other by guides 44 mounted adjacent the pivot for the surface 2 and extending forwardly to a control windlass 46. 413,456 . Controlling aircraft. Tower, L. R., an d Boeing Airplane Co., 200, West Michigan Street, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. April 19, 1933, No. 11486. [Class 4.] Means for controlling aircraft comprise an auxiliary control surface 4 mounted at the trailing

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1935

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