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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office main shaft driving both rotor shafts 21, 24 through cone or multiplatc slipping friction couplings 25, 26 Month in the Patent Office and bevel gears. The engine 15 and clutch 16 may be duplicated, cither both sets driving the gear 17 or each set driving through individual gears. When the engine These abstracts or British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared speed falls sufficiently to disengage the clutch an arm abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 27, FIG. 7, may actuate through a mechanical linkage 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies 28, 31, 33 cither the propeller blade pitch change of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each. mechanism as to set the blades for auto-rotation, or a warning signal. In FIG. 9 (not shown), the linkage 28, 31, 33 is replaced by an electrical contact closed, when the clutch is disengaged, to complete a circuit operating a warning light or buzzer or an electrical 615,933. Control systems for aircraft. Faircy Avia­ retracted into the fuselage by rotation of the shafts control mechanism. Cooling air for the engine or tion Co. Ltd. Chaplin, H. E., and Costigan, F. J. 21 .. . 24 about vertical shafts 25, 26 rotatable by arms engines is produced by a fan working in a suitable duct June 27, 1946, No. 19,259. (Class 4.) 27, 28, each having a pin-and-slot connexion with a and driven from the engine shaft. An aircraft is controlled, at least at high speed, by retraction control rod 30. In an alternative construc­ surfaces mounted in the exhaust stream from the en­ tion, the surfaces 15, 18 arc replaced by two horizont­ 615,961. Aircraft undercarriages. Olaer Patent Co., gine or engines and pivotally movable under the pilot's ally extending surfaces, one behind each jet tube 19, and Compagnie Gendrale Pour L'Equipmcnt Aero- control by means of a linkage which includes T-shaped 20, which are operated similarly to ailerons, and a nautiquc. Aug. 23, 1946, No. 25,292. Convention date, levers, the cross limbs of which are slotted and vertical rudder-like surface. The surfaces may be June 6, 1945. (Class 4.) mounted on pivots movable in the slots so that the mounted in the exhaust streams of engines other than jet engines and the two exhaust tubes 19, 20 may con­ velocity ratio of the control linkage may be varied. stitute the rear ends of a pair of divergent tubes carry­ Surfaces 15 ... 18 mounted immediately behind the ing the exhaust of a single engine. discharge tubes 19, 20 of a pair of jet engines arc mounted for rotation about shafts 21 .. . 24 under the pilot's control through a linkage including arms 615,947. Helicopters. Franklin, H. W. Aug. 19, 31 . . . 34, links 35 .. . 38 and 41, 42, reversing levers 1946, No. 24,580. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIV.) 39, 40 and T-shaped members, 43, 44. The latter are A centrifugally engaged friction clutch applicable pivoted about vertical axes 45, 46; rotation about to helicopter drives comprises spring-retracted these axes causes the control surfaces on the corre­ weighted levers 4, FIGS. 1 and 2, pivoted in the plane sponding side to move in opposite senses while bodily of the clutch axis on driving radial arms 3 and carrying movement of the T-mcmbcr causes the corresponding near their pivots friction pads 12 engaging the outer surfaces to move in the same sense. The T-mcmbcrs rim of a driven wheel 9. Alternatively, FIG. 3 (not 45 are restrained in their bodily movement by arms shown), the pads 12 may be on the same side of the 47, 48 pivoted to a fixed bracket 49 and their rotation pivots as the weights 6 and engage the inner surface is controlled by links 79, 80 and arm 81 secured to a of a driven drum whose outer surface has gear teeth shaft 82 rotatable by a linkage from the rudder bar 94; transmitting the drive to a meshing pinion. As ap­ this rotation in a like sense of the T-mcmbers 43, 44 plied to a helicopter of the kind described in Specifica­ causes the surfaces on one side to approach and those tion 615,292, having two lifting rotors, the drive is on the other side to diverge from one another so taken from an engine 15 by a clutch 16, FIG. 5, of the steering the aircraft. The members 43, 44 are moved above kind and transmitted through a gear 17 to a bodily in a like sense by links 50, 51 when a member An undercarriage leg fitted with the normal tele­ 52, secured to a vertical shaft 53 rotatably mounted scopic shock-absorber 1, 2, is provided with a plurality in a bracket 55 rotating about a vertical shaft 56, is of pairs of torque links 3, 4, the pivot pins 8 of which moved bodily by a linkage 57, 58, 62, 63, 64, 65 oper­ arc non-parallel so that the links may resist bending ated by fore-and-aft movement of the pilot's control of the shock-absorber tube 2. FIGS. 2 and 3 show two column 66; this bodily movement in a like sense of sets of torque links arranged at right-angles, but other members 43, 44 causes all the surfaces 15 .. . 18 to arrangements arc described in which four sets of links move in the same sense and thus to have an elevator arc disposed at right-angles to each other, and in effect. Unlike bodily movement of the members 43, which three sets arc arranged at 120 degrees apart. 44 moves the surfaces on one side in one sense and those on the other side in the opposite sense to pro­ 617,283. Helicopters. Bell Aircraft Corporation. vide an aileron effect; this motion is controlled by Aug 23, 1946, No. 25,267. Convention date, April 5, lateral swinging of the control column 66 which 1946. (Class 4.) rotates a lever 77 secured to a hollow shaft 78 and, A helicopter rotor comprising one or a pair of through a linkage 76, 72, 71 rotates, bell-crank 70, blades is mounted for pivotal movement relatively to 69 freely mounted on shaft 56 and linked by a mem­ the drive shaft to provide a control axis disposed less ber 68 to an arm 67 secured to shaft 53; rotation of than 90 degrees rcarwardly of the blade longitudinal the bell-crank thus causes rotation of member 52 and axis. As shown in FIG. 1, a two-bladed rotor 10, 12 is unlike bodily movement of members 43, 44. The universally mounted at the end of a drive shaft 20 by linkages for the three types of control each include a gimbal rings 14, 18, flapping of the blades being T-shaped lever 58, 72 or 85 connected at one end of a limited by a stop 24 against which the outer ring 14 slot 59, 73, 86 to the linkage 57, 71, 84 and at the other may bear. The stop is located at an angle of less than end to a linkage 61, 75, 88 connected to conventional 90 degrees rcarwardly of the longitudinal axis of the flight controls. In the slot 59, 73 or 86 slides a pivot blade 10. A similar stop may be provided rcarwardly pin 60,74, 87 about which the lever turns in operation. of the blade 12. In the modification according to Thus, by moving the pin along the slot the relative ex­ riG. 4, the outer gimbal ring is connected to a pilot's tents of operation of the high speed and conventional control member 60 by arms 40, 44 mounted rcar­ controls may be varied. The surfaces 15 .. . 18 may be wardly of the blade 10. In a further modification, the hub is directly mounted on the drive shaft by means of a cross-pin in the plane of the rotor and inclined to the blade axis (FIG 6, not shown). Stabilizing masses ml, ml, or 31, 32 may be mounted on arms disposed perpendicular to the blade axes. Specifications 580,231 and 600,013 are referred to. March 1952 89 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 24 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032144
Publisher site
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Abstract

main shaft driving both rotor shafts 21, 24 through cone or multiplatc slipping friction couplings 25, 26 Month in the Patent Office and bevel gears. The engine 15 and clutch 16 may be duplicated, cither both sets driving the gear 17 or each set driving through individual gears. When the engine These abstracts or British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared speed falls sufficiently to disengage the clutch an arm abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 27, FIG. 7, may actuate through a mechanical linkage 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies 28, 31, 33 cither the propeller blade pitch change of the full specifications arc obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each. mechanism as to set the blades for auto-rotation, or a warning signal. In FIG. 9 (not shown), the linkage 28, 31, 33 is replaced by an electrical contact closed, when the clutch is disengaged, to complete a circuit operating a warning light or buzzer or an electrical 615,933. Control systems for aircraft. Faircy Avia­ retracted into the fuselage by rotation of the shafts control mechanism. Cooling air for the engine or tion Co. Ltd. Chaplin, H. E., and Costigan, F. J. 21 .. . 24 about vertical shafts 25, 26 rotatable by arms engines is produced by a fan working in a suitable duct June 27, 1946, No. 19,259. (Class 4.) 27, 28, each having a pin-and-slot connexion with a and driven from the engine shaft. An aircraft is controlled, at least at high speed, by retraction control rod 30. In an alternative construc­ surfaces mounted in the exhaust stream from the en­ tion, the surfaces 15, 18 arc replaced by two horizont­ 615,961. Aircraft undercarriages. Olaer Patent Co., gine or engines and pivotally movable under the pilot's ally extending surfaces, one behind each jet tube 19, and Compagnie Gendrale Pour L'Equipmcnt Aero- control by means of a linkage which includes T-shaped 20, which are operated similarly to ailerons, and a nautiquc. Aug. 23, 1946, No. 25,292. Convention date, levers, the cross limbs of which are slotted and vertical rudder-like surface. The surfaces may be June 6, 1945. (Class 4.) mounted on pivots movable in the slots so that the mounted in the exhaust streams of engines other than jet engines and the two exhaust tubes 19, 20 may con­ velocity ratio of the control linkage may be varied. stitute the rear ends of a pair of divergent tubes carry­ Surfaces 15 ... 18 mounted immediately behind the ing the exhaust of a single engine. discharge tubes 19, 20 of a pair of jet engines arc mounted for rotation about shafts 21 .. . 24 under the pilot's control through a linkage including arms 615,947. Helicopters. Franklin, H. W. Aug. 19, 31 . . . 34, links 35 .. . 38 and 41, 42, reversing levers 1946, No. 24,580. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIV.) 39, 40 and T-shaped members, 43, 44. The latter are A centrifugally engaged friction clutch applicable pivoted about vertical axes 45, 46; rotation about to helicopter drives comprises spring-retracted these axes causes the control surfaces on the corre­ weighted levers 4, FIGS. 1 and 2, pivoted in the plane sponding side to move in opposite senses while bodily of the clutch axis on driving radial arms 3 and carrying movement of the T-mcmbcr causes the corresponding near their pivots friction pads 12 engaging the outer surfaces to move in the same sense. The T-mcmbcrs rim of a driven wheel 9. Alternatively, FIG. 3 (not 45 are restrained in their bodily movement by arms shown), the pads 12 may be on the same side of the 47, 48 pivoted to a fixed bracket 49 and their rotation pivots as the weights 6 and engage the inner surface is controlled by links 79, 80 and arm 81 secured to a of a driven drum whose outer surface has gear teeth shaft 82 rotatable by a linkage from the rudder bar 94; transmitting the drive to a meshing pinion. As ap­ this rotation in a like sense of the T-mcmbers 43, 44 plied to a helicopter of the kind described in Specifica­ causes the surfaces on one side to approach and those tion 615,292, having two lifting rotors, the drive is on the other side to diverge from one another so taken from an engine 15 by a clutch 16, FIG. 5, of the steering the aircraft. The members 43, 44 are moved above kind and transmitted through a gear 17 to a bodily in a like sense by links 50, 51 when a member An undercarriage leg fitted with the normal tele­ 52, secured to a vertical shaft 53 rotatably mounted scopic shock-absorber 1, 2, is provided with a plurality in a bracket 55 rotating about a vertical shaft 56, is of pairs of torque links 3, 4, the pivot pins 8 of which moved bodily by a linkage 57, 58, 62, 63, 64, 65 oper­ arc non-parallel so that the links may resist bending ated by fore-and-aft movement of the pilot's control of the shock-absorber tube 2. FIGS. 2 and 3 show two column 66; this bodily movement in a like sense of sets of torque links arranged at right-angles, but other members 43, 44 causes all the surfaces 15 .. . 18 to arrangements arc described in which four sets of links move in the same sense and thus to have an elevator arc disposed at right-angles to each other, and in effect. Unlike bodily movement of the members 43, which three sets arc arranged at 120 degrees apart. 44 moves the surfaces on one side in one sense and those on the other side in the opposite sense to pro­ 617,283. Helicopters. Bell Aircraft Corporation. vide an aileron effect; this motion is controlled by Aug 23, 1946, No. 25,267. Convention date, April 5, lateral swinging of the control column 66 which 1946. (Class 4.) rotates a lever 77 secured to a hollow shaft 78 and, A helicopter rotor comprising one or a pair of through a linkage 76, 72, 71 rotates, bell-crank 70, blades is mounted for pivotal movement relatively to 69 freely mounted on shaft 56 and linked by a mem­ the drive shaft to provide a control axis disposed less ber 68 to an arm 67 secured to shaft 53; rotation of than 90 degrees rcarwardly of the blade longitudinal the bell-crank thus causes rotation of member 52 and axis. As shown in FIG. 1, a two-bladed rotor 10, 12 is unlike bodily movement of members 43, 44. The universally mounted at the end of a drive shaft 20 by linkages for the three types of control each include a gimbal rings 14, 18, flapping of the blades being T-shaped lever 58, 72 or 85 connected at one end of a limited by a stop 24 against which the outer ring 14 slot 59, 73, 86 to the linkage 57, 71, 84 and at the other may bear. The stop is located at an angle of less than end to a linkage 61, 75, 88 connected to conventional 90 degrees rcarwardly of the longitudinal axis of the flight controls. In the slot 59, 73 or 86 slides a pivot blade 10. A similar stop may be provided rcarwardly pin 60,74, 87 about which the lever turns in operation. of the blade 12. In the modification according to Thus, by moving the pin along the slot the relative ex­ riG. 4, the outer gimbal ring is connected to a pilot's tents of operation of the high speed and conventional control member 60 by arms 40, 44 mounted rcar­ controls may be varied. The surfaces 15 .. . 18 may be wardly of the blade 10. In a further modification, the hub is directly mounted on the drive shaft by means of a cross-pin in the plane of the rotor and inclined to the blade axis (FIG 6, not shown). Stabilizing masses ml, ml, or 31, 32 may be mounted on arms disposed perpendicular to the blade axes. Specifications 580,231 and 600,013 are referred to. March 1952 89

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1952

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