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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 216 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1929 A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications No . 309,110. Aircraft. Bristol Aeroplane Fuselages; planes, construction of.—To prevent automatically, or positively by connection with Co., Ltd., and Pollard, H. J., Filton House, corrosion of the interiors of metal aircraft a hinged portion of a tail surface or the con­ trols therefor, in order to form "slots" at Bristol. Jan. 3, 1928, No. 198. structures, paraffin oil is introduced into either side of the surface. In the arrangement existing cavities or into cavities specially Framework.—Aircraft wings, fuselages, and shown in Fig. 2, th e thin planes h, j are carried provided, the remoter portions of the structure othe r light structures comprising tubular mem­ b y arms k, m pivoted to a vertical or horizontal being protected as bers built up from two or more metal strips tai l surface n, one or other of the planes being a result of evapora­ wit h out-turned flanges and continuous from moved by suction on one side or other of the tion and condensation end to end of the member, have gusset plates of the oil. Metal leading edge of the surface n. In the arrange­ secured to adjoining flanges on the tubular wings are formed with ment shown in Fig. 3, levers carrying the thin members, and bracing members are secured to a n airtight central th e gusset plates so that the line of action of box girder with lead­ each member of the structure passes through ing and trailing por­ the centroid of that member. The tubular tions secured thereto, members are formed from two, three, or four small quantities of metal strips extending the whole length of the paraffin being intro­ member, as described in Specification 264,626. duced through man­ holes. Fig. 4 shows two constructions of fuselage, that shown on the left having cavities 14 between inner and outer side walls which communicate with a space 8 beneath th e floor so as to be filled with vapour from paraffin 9. That shown on th e right has spaces 14 separate from the space 8 and separately charged with oil through an opening 15. An inner wall 16 of plywood spaced from the inner skin of the fuselage assists in keeping th e cabin free from odours and noise. planes are operated by a cam r which is turned about its shaft s by the controls t of the hinged portion o of the tail surface. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 4, the levers p, q No . 311,134. Aircraft engines. Black­ carrying the thin planes carry blocks y, z burn Aeroplane & Motor Co., Ltd., Olympia, slidable in an arcuate guide x connected by Leeds, and Bumpus, F . A., Elloughton, Brough, links v, w to the control lever u of the tail nea r Hull. June 23, 1928, No. 18239. portion o, the guide being also connected to Cylinders, pipes for; exhaust silencers.—An th e portion o by a link 11 which is pivoted at Figs. 7 and 8 show a joint for a fuselage wherein exhaust system, for reducing the head-resistance its rear end coaxially with the portion o and a gusset plate 34 is secured between the flanges of an aircraft, and the noise, and visibility is controlled by a cam 13 th e shaft 14 of which of a tubular boom 33 and also between the a t night, of the engine exhaust, comprises is rotate d by a pulley 16 an d a cable 15 connected flanges of two tubular bracing members 37, 42. an annular or U-shaped manifold A with to a lever 17 on the portion o. When the tail A bracing member 41 is similarly secured to the longitudinal manifolds G leading the exhaust portion o is moved by the controls t, the cam boom 33. A plate 44, having bent flanges 45, gas from longitudinal banks of cylinders, 13 moves the link 11 to one side or the other 46 is secured to the flanges of the members 37, so that movement of the guide x by the links 41 , and the flanges of a diagonal member 43 are v, w moves only one of the planes h, j. The secured thereto on opposite sides. Alterna­ rat e of formation of the "slots " varies with tively, the flanges of the boom may be embraced th e extent of movement of the portion o. A b y pairs of gusset plates secured between the zero-setting control may be incorporated by flanges of the bracing members. Fig. 15 shows malting the cam 13 angularly adjustable a modification in which two bracing members 81 , with respect to the pulley 16. 82 are secured to a single gusset plate having a ben t portion 84 resting against the boom 83. The ends of the bracing members may be reinforced internally or externally by sleeves, or by flat plates butted against the edges of th e gusset plates and riveted between the flanges. For building up irregular outlines, the gusset plates or the flanges of the boom may be bent into the plane of the bracing member. arranged radially about the crank-shaft. The Specification 24948/96 is referred to. manifold A is arranged within the exterior contour of the engine and the propeller boss No . 310,970. Aircraft. Rohrbach. A., 12, C, and, if annular, it is joined, tangentially Ruhrstrasse , Wilmersdorf, Berlin. May 3, b y the manifolds G ; tail pipes J lead the gas 1929, No. 13830. Convention date, May 4, to the atmosphere and if the manifold A is 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open U-shaped, its lower ends merge into the pipes J. to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. No . 311,348. Aircraft. Wright, M. E . A., * The following abstracts of complete specifica­ 7, Briar Road, Kenton, Middlesex. Nov. 9, tions of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, 1927, No. 30062. from abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. Steering, balancing, and regulating altitude.— Printed copies of the full specifications can be Tail surfaces of aircraft, particularly surfaces obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton of substantially symmetrical aerofoil section, Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. have thin planes mounted at each side of their Except where otherwise stated, if no illustration is reproduced the specification is unaccompanied leading edges and adapted to be moved from by drawings. a normal position in contact with the surfaces http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 1 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1929

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029170
Publisher site
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Abstract

216 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1929 A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications No . 309,110. Aircraft. Bristol Aeroplane Fuselages; planes, construction of.—To prevent automatically, or positively by connection with Co., Ltd., and Pollard, H. J., Filton House, corrosion of the interiors of metal aircraft a hinged portion of a tail surface or the con­ trols therefor, in order to form "slots" at Bristol. Jan. 3, 1928, No. 198. structures, paraffin oil is introduced into either side of the surface. In the arrangement existing cavities or into cavities specially Framework.—Aircraft wings, fuselages, and shown in Fig. 2, th e thin planes h, j are carried provided, the remoter portions of the structure othe r light structures comprising tubular mem­ b y arms k, m pivoted to a vertical or horizontal being protected as bers built up from two or more metal strips tai l surface n, one or other of the planes being a result of evapora­ wit h out-turned flanges and continuous from moved by suction on one side or other of the tion and condensation end to end of the member, have gusset plates of the oil. Metal leading edge of the surface n. In the arrange­ secured to adjoining flanges on the tubular wings are formed with ment shown in Fig. 3, levers carrying the thin members, and bracing members are secured to a n airtight central th e gusset plates so that the line of action of box girder with lead­ each member of the structure passes through ing and trailing por­ the centroid of that member. The tubular tions secured thereto, members are formed from two, three, or four small quantities of metal strips extending the whole length of the paraffin being intro­ member, as described in Specification 264,626. duced through man­ holes. Fig. 4 shows two constructions of fuselage, that shown on the left having cavities 14 between inner and outer side walls which communicate with a space 8 beneath th e floor so as to be filled with vapour from paraffin 9. That shown on th e right has spaces 14 separate from the space 8 and separately charged with oil through an opening 15. An inner wall 16 of plywood spaced from the inner skin of the fuselage assists in keeping th e cabin free from odours and noise. planes are operated by a cam r which is turned about its shaft s by the controls t of the hinged portion o of the tail surface. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 4, the levers p, q No . 311,134. Aircraft engines. Black­ carrying the thin planes carry blocks y, z burn Aeroplane & Motor Co., Ltd., Olympia, slidable in an arcuate guide x connected by Leeds, and Bumpus, F . A., Elloughton, Brough, links v, w to the control lever u of the tail nea r Hull. June 23, 1928, No. 18239. portion o, the guide being also connected to Cylinders, pipes for; exhaust silencers.—An th e portion o by a link 11 which is pivoted at Figs. 7 and 8 show a joint for a fuselage wherein exhaust system, for reducing the head-resistance its rear end coaxially with the portion o and a gusset plate 34 is secured between the flanges of an aircraft, and the noise, and visibility is controlled by a cam 13 th e shaft 14 of which of a tubular boom 33 and also between the a t night, of the engine exhaust, comprises is rotate d by a pulley 16 an d a cable 15 connected flanges of two tubular bracing members 37, 42. an annular or U-shaped manifold A with to a lever 17 on the portion o. When the tail A bracing member 41 is similarly secured to the longitudinal manifolds G leading the exhaust portion o is moved by the controls t, the cam boom 33. A plate 44, having bent flanges 45, gas from longitudinal banks of cylinders, 13 moves the link 11 to one side or the other 46 is secured to the flanges of the members 37, so that movement of the guide x by the links 41 , and the flanges of a diagonal member 43 are v, w moves only one of the planes h, j. The secured thereto on opposite sides. Alterna­ rat e of formation of the "slots " varies with tively, the flanges of the boom may be embraced th e extent of movement of the portion o. A b y pairs of gusset plates secured between the zero-setting control may be incorporated by flanges of the bracing members. Fig. 15 shows malting the cam 13 angularly adjustable a modification in which two bracing members 81 , with respect to the pulley 16. 82 are secured to a single gusset plate having a ben t portion 84 resting against the boom 83. The ends of the bracing members may be reinforced internally or externally by sleeves, or by flat plates butted against the edges of th e gusset plates and riveted between the flanges. For building up irregular outlines, the gusset plates or the flanges of the boom may be bent into the plane of the bracing member. arranged radially about the crank-shaft. The Specification 24948/96 is referred to. manifold A is arranged within the exterior contour of the engine and the propeller boss No . 310,970. Aircraft. Rohrbach. A., 12, C, and, if annular, it is joined, tangentially Ruhrstrasse , Wilmersdorf, Berlin. May 3, b y the manifolds G ; tail pipes J lead the gas 1929, No. 13830. Convention date, May 4, to the atmosphere and if the manifold A is 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open U-shaped, its lower ends merge into the pipes J. to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. No . 311,348. Aircraft. Wright, M. E . A., * The following abstracts of complete specifica­ 7, Briar Road, Kenton, Middlesex. Nov. 9, tions of Patents recently published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, 1927, No. 30062. from abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. Steering, balancing, and regulating altitude.— Printed copies of the full specifications can be Tail surfaces of aircraft, particularly surfaces obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton of substantially symmetrical aerofoil section, Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. have thin planes mounted at each side of their Except where otherwise stated, if no illustration is reproduced the specification is unaccompanied leading edges and adapted to be moved from by drawings. a normal position in contact with the surfaces

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1929

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