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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 210 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 417,045 . Airscrews. Grant, A. J., and pivoted to a block, in which case the wheels are Bridge, J. F., Atlas Works, Sheffield. Jan. 23, swung up in a forward direction. The wheels when 1933, No. 2181. [Class 114.1 retracte d may be housed in the fuselage, or in Blades for propellers, particularly airscrews, are fairings attache d to its sides. mad e from a seamless tube of stainless steel con­ taining 6-14 per cent nickel, 10-20 per cent chromium, up to 0·25 per cent carbon, together with 0·3-0·9 per cent titanium and with or without 0·3-1·5 per cent tungsten. The tube 10 of uniform bore is given a short tapered thickness 12 and a long tapered thickness by swaging, forging, hot rolling, drawing, or pressing in dies and with internal mandrels to the shape shown in Fig. 3. The outer walls are then machined to requisite thickness and the hub completed with flanges. The tube is then pressed in dies to an approxi­ matel y elliptical form and the top end closed by welding. The hub is provided with a plug 17, Fig. 7, which has a screw threaded bore 18 to receive a supply pipe 19, whereby glycerine or othe r liquid under pressure is introduced into the interior whilst the blade is being finished by dies 20. 417,139 . Airscrews. Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., Wylie, H . N., and Gould, G. H., Whitley Aerodrome, Whitley, Coventry. May 5, 1934, No. 13224/33. [Class 114.] In an airscrew blade comprising a thin shell and a t least one longitudinal internal support which is of a material having a lower density than that of th e shell, a support is secured to the inner surface of the shell by an adhesive setting agent or by an d also pivotally mounted on the aeroplane in compression under the springiness of the shell such manner that the pivotal axes can be brought surface, the shell being imperforate in the vicinity int o alignment to facilitate swinging the landing- of the support. The metal shell 12 is trimmed at membe r and struts together about the common its edges 13 and a stiffener 14 of lower density is axis . As shown, a landing-wheel 12 is carried by a secured thereto by an adhesive having properties pai r of oleolegs 14 connected by a bridge 15 and similar to those of plastic wood. The longitudinal pivoted to brackets 16 in recesses in the underside suppor t 15 consisting of a hollow wooden strut of an aircraft wing. Radius rods 17 are pivoted provided with peripheral recesses 16, is preshaped a t their lower ends to the legs 14 an d at their upper an d slightly oversize so tha t when inserted it will ends to a block 18 carried by a screwed spindle 19 contac t with the internal surface of the shell and be rotatabl e through a chain 21 and sprocket-wheel held by the springiness thereof. The recesses may 20 from the cockpit or elsewhere to bring the rods also be filled with plastic wood before insertion or 17 int o alignment with th e legs 14 before the wheel forced through the hollow support and out through 12 is retracted by a cable 22 from the cockpit. holes 18. Hardening of the plastic material is Hinged Haps 24 ar e provided for closing the major facilitated by circulating a current of air down the portion of the wheel recesses. The legs 14 ma y be centr e of the support. The support 15 is secured a t the root where it is of circular section, by means of an external sleeve 20 having an external flange 21 adapted to engage an inner sleeve 22 on the blade root. The strut may be large enough to contac t with the whole of the inner surface of the shell. 418,468 . Aircraft landing-gear. Arm­ stron g Whitworth Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., and Lloyd, J., Whitley, Coventry. Nov. 8, 1933, No. .31066. [Class 4.] A retractable landing member is connected to a n aeroplane by two struts hinged to one another * These abstracts of complete specifications of patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgements can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price 1s. each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ panied by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 7 (8): 1 – Aug 1, 1935

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029961
Publisher site
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Abstract

210 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING August, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 417,045 . Airscrews. Grant, A. J., and pivoted to a block, in which case the wheels are Bridge, J. F., Atlas Works, Sheffield. Jan. 23, swung up in a forward direction. The wheels when 1933, No. 2181. [Class 114.1 retracte d may be housed in the fuselage, or in Blades for propellers, particularly airscrews, are fairings attache d to its sides. mad e from a seamless tube of stainless steel con­ taining 6-14 per cent nickel, 10-20 per cent chromium, up to 0·25 per cent carbon, together with 0·3-0·9 per cent titanium and with or without 0·3-1·5 per cent tungsten. The tube 10 of uniform bore is given a short tapered thickness 12 and a long tapered thickness by swaging, forging, hot rolling, drawing, or pressing in dies and with internal mandrels to the shape shown in Fig. 3. The outer walls are then machined to requisite thickness and the hub completed with flanges. The tube is then pressed in dies to an approxi­ matel y elliptical form and the top end closed by welding. The hub is provided with a plug 17, Fig. 7, which has a screw threaded bore 18 to receive a supply pipe 19, whereby glycerine or othe r liquid under pressure is introduced into the interior whilst the blade is being finished by dies 20. 417,139 . Airscrews. Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., Wylie, H . N., and Gould, G. H., Whitley Aerodrome, Whitley, Coventry. May 5, 1934, No. 13224/33. [Class 114.] In an airscrew blade comprising a thin shell and a t least one longitudinal internal support which is of a material having a lower density than that of th e shell, a support is secured to the inner surface of the shell by an adhesive setting agent or by an d also pivotally mounted on the aeroplane in compression under the springiness of the shell such manner that the pivotal axes can be brought surface, the shell being imperforate in the vicinity int o alignment to facilitate swinging the landing- of the support. The metal shell 12 is trimmed at membe r and struts together about the common its edges 13 and a stiffener 14 of lower density is axis . As shown, a landing-wheel 12 is carried by a secured thereto by an adhesive having properties pai r of oleolegs 14 connected by a bridge 15 and similar to those of plastic wood. The longitudinal pivoted to brackets 16 in recesses in the underside suppor t 15 consisting of a hollow wooden strut of an aircraft wing. Radius rods 17 are pivoted provided with peripheral recesses 16, is preshaped a t their lower ends to the legs 14 an d at their upper an d slightly oversize so tha t when inserted it will ends to a block 18 carried by a screwed spindle 19 contac t with the internal surface of the shell and be rotatabl e through a chain 21 and sprocket-wheel held by the springiness thereof. The recesses may 20 from the cockpit or elsewhere to bring the rods also be filled with plastic wood before insertion or 17 int o alignment with th e legs 14 before the wheel forced through the hollow support and out through 12 is retracted by a cable 22 from the cockpit. holes 18. Hardening of the plastic material is Hinged Haps 24 ar e provided for closing the major facilitated by circulating a current of air down the portion of the wheel recesses. The legs 14 ma y be centr e of the support. The support 15 is secured a t the root where it is of circular section, by means of an external sleeve 20 having an external flange 21 adapted to engage an inner sleeve 22 on the blade root. The strut may be large enough to contac t with the whole of the inner surface of the shell. 418,468 . Aircraft landing-gear. Arm­ stron g Whitworth Aircraft, Ltd., Sir W. G., and Lloyd, J., Whitley, Coventry. Nov. 8, 1933, No. .31066. [Class 4.] A retractable landing member is connected to a n aeroplane by two struts hinged to one another * These abstracts of complete specifications of patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgements can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price 1s. each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ panied by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1935

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