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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 30, while the major side is alternatively connected to a reservoir 41 or to a hydraulic pump 44, by means of a valve 57. The minor side of the piston 6 is vented to atmosphere through a port 12 in the cylindcrt 1, while, the major side is alternatively connected to the reser­ voir 41 or the pump 44 by means of a valve 35. These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies 626,389. Propelling aircraft. Westinghouse Electric International Co. March 14, 1947, No. 7,100. Con­ of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 2s. 8d. each. vention date July 21, 1943. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXVI.) 625,579. Aircraft. Hurel, M. L. July 30, 1946, 625,910. Aircraft control systems. Soc. dTnven- Nos. 22,678 and 22,679. Convention dates Sept. 5, tions Acronautiques et Mccaniques S.I.A.M. Aug. 1945, and June 17, 1946. (Class 4.) 23, 1946, No. 25,290. Convention date April 13, 1942. An aircraft is provided with fixed wings 2 and ex­ (Class 4.) ternal bracings 4 therefor, the latter serving as auxili­ An aircraft is provided with a high lift device com­ ary lifting surfaces, the aspect ratio of the whole prising a flap 1 adapted to define a slot between itself lifting surfaces being not less than fifteen, while the and the wing 8, and an intermediate clement 15 in the In a jet-propelled aircraft the jet nozzles include flap wing loading is not less than 80 kg./sq. meter. FIGS. 8 slot is arranged so that when the high lift device is con­ members pivoted to the aircraft framework to con­ and 9 show a section through a wing 2 and strut 1 stitute the discharge opening or openings of the nozzles, siderably deflected the lift of the wing may be con­ near their junction, FIGS. 10, 11 and 12 showing the the members being relatively movable for varying the trolled by elevating the trailing edge of the member 15. increasing angle of incidence of the strut throughout size of the discharge opening to control the jet effect its length inboard towards the fuselage. A form of and jointly movable for varying the direction of dis­ wing shown in nos. 13 and 14 comprises upper and charge from said openings. One or more jet-propul­ lower skins 104,' 105 secured at their leading edges by sion units 11 arc installed within the wings 10, the jet a member 110 and at their rear edges by angle sections being passed between and controlled by hinged flaps III , 112. Separate ribs 108, 109 arc provided for the 21, 22, normally conforming to the wing profile but respective sections, appropriately shaped openings capable of movement relative to each other, the upper being formed for the stringers 106, 107. FIGS. 15 and flap 21 being provided with vertical end plates 25 mov­ 16 show an arrangement of flaps 113 and ailerons 114, able therewith. The flaps 21, 22 on each side of the the latter being operable as lift flaps in addition to ful­ aircraft may be moved differentially to enable the jet filling their normal function. The flaps arc operated by thrust to augment the aileron effect or they may be a handle 122 connected by chain-and-sprocket to a moved simultaneously downwards to act as flaps and screwed shaft 120 carrying sleeves 119 connected to to cause the downwardly directed jet thrust to pro­ The flap 1 is mounted at 2, 3 on links 4, 5, the link 4 the ends of levers 117, whose other ends'arc connected duce increased lift. The flaps may be hinged diver­ being pivoted at 6 to the wing and the link S bicng to links 116 operating the flaps. The levers 117 arc gently to reduce the thrust and to act as dive brakes. pivoted at 10 to an arm 11 of a bell-crank lever 12 connected to further levers 127 operating links 126 Specification 590,799 is referred to. pivoted at 13 on the link 4, and extension of the flap I connected to the ailerons, so that simultaneous move­ is controlled by a rod 14. Tle element 15 is pivoted on ment of the latter also results from operation of the an extension of the pivot 13 on a plate 16, also pivoted 626,454. Aircraft propeller drives. United Aircraft handle 122. Differential movement of the ailerons is at 13. The plate 16 may be turned about the pivot 13 Corporation. Jan. 4, 1946, No. 333. Convention date obtained by movement of a link 134 connected to one by a bell-crank lever 20, 23, pivoted to the plate at 20, Feb. 17, 1945. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIV.) end of a lever 131 whose other end is pivoted to the to the wing at 22, and to the arm 25 of the bell-crank mid-point of a further link 130 connecting the levers 12, at 24. A hydraulic, mechanical, or other jack 17 connected between the element 15 and the plate 16 controls the inclination of the element 15, the jack preferably having an internal abutment limiting its stroke. The clement 15 may be movable to a position perpendicular to the wing, the jack being 17 then of the type described in Specification 625,913. A fluid- pressure control system by which the normal controls control the elements 15 when the flaps 1 arc operated is described. Two engines 26, 28 in an aircraft arc coupled through driving shafts 34, transmission means 30, 32, 625,913. Controlling aircraft. Soc. d'lnventions driven shafts 36 and bevel gears and shafting as shown, Acronautiques et Mccaniques S.l.A.M. Sept. 12, to two propellers 10, 12, so that either or both engines 1946, No. 27,437. Convention date Jan. 7, 1942. may be used to drive the propellers in cither of two (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIX.) speed ratios. Each of the transmission means 30, 32 is Hydraulic control gear for aircraft wing-flaps com­ controlled by hydraulic clutches operated by the pres­ prises a jack cylinder 1 having an operating piston 15 sure of a pump driven by both the corresponding and an additional chamber 8 with a piston 6, at one driving shaft 34 and the driven shaft 36 or by which­ end, for actuating the piston 15 over part of its stroke ever of these may be rotating, as described in Group to afford an intermediate setting of the flaps 29, as XXIV, the distribution of the pressure supply from shown in FIG 4. The minor side of the piston 15 is un­ the pump being effected by a'valve controlled by the der constant hydraulic pressure from an accumulator pilot to provide two forward speed ratios and neutral. 626,780. Aerofoils. Griffith, A. A. April 25, 1947. No. 11,175. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXVI.) An aerofoil suitable for use at supersonic velocities is generated from a basic section of lozenge, triangular or similar form by machining a plane surface 14 on one or both sides so that the ratio of maximum thick­ ness to chord decreases towards the tip 12. The chord is constant from the tip 12 to the root 10. The basic section may be elongated diamond or biconvex form, or may alternatively be of elongated triangular or plano-convex form with a single plane surface 14 machined on the side opposite the base. Alternative positions of the root 10 arc indicated at 18 and 19. 382 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 24 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032244
Publisher site
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Abstract

30, while the major side is alternatively connected to a reservoir 41 or to a hydraulic pump 44, by means of a valve 57. The minor side of the piston 6 is vented to atmosphere through a port 12 in the cylindcrt 1, while, the major side is alternatively connected to the reser­ voir 41 or the pump 44 by means of a valve 35. These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies 626,389. Propelling aircraft. Westinghouse Electric International Co. March 14, 1947, No. 7,100. Con­ of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 2s. 8d. each. vention date July 21, 1943. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXVI.) 625,579. Aircraft. Hurel, M. L. July 30, 1946, 625,910. Aircraft control systems. Soc. dTnven- Nos. 22,678 and 22,679. Convention dates Sept. 5, tions Acronautiques et Mccaniques S.I.A.M. Aug. 1945, and June 17, 1946. (Class 4.) 23, 1946, No. 25,290. Convention date April 13, 1942. An aircraft is provided with fixed wings 2 and ex­ (Class 4.) ternal bracings 4 therefor, the latter serving as auxili­ An aircraft is provided with a high lift device com­ ary lifting surfaces, the aspect ratio of the whole prising a flap 1 adapted to define a slot between itself lifting surfaces being not less than fifteen, while the and the wing 8, and an intermediate clement 15 in the In a jet-propelled aircraft the jet nozzles include flap wing loading is not less than 80 kg./sq. meter. FIGS. 8 slot is arranged so that when the high lift device is con­ members pivoted to the aircraft framework to con­ and 9 show a section through a wing 2 and strut 1 stitute the discharge opening or openings of the nozzles, siderably deflected the lift of the wing may be con­ near their junction, FIGS. 10, 11 and 12 showing the the members being relatively movable for varying the trolled by elevating the trailing edge of the member 15. increasing angle of incidence of the strut throughout size of the discharge opening to control the jet effect its length inboard towards the fuselage. A form of and jointly movable for varying the direction of dis­ wing shown in nos. 13 and 14 comprises upper and charge from said openings. One or more jet-propul­ lower skins 104,' 105 secured at their leading edges by sion units 11 arc installed within the wings 10, the jet a member 110 and at their rear edges by angle sections being passed between and controlled by hinged flaps III , 112. Separate ribs 108, 109 arc provided for the 21, 22, normally conforming to the wing profile but respective sections, appropriately shaped openings capable of movement relative to each other, the upper being formed for the stringers 106, 107. FIGS. 15 and flap 21 being provided with vertical end plates 25 mov­ 16 show an arrangement of flaps 113 and ailerons 114, able therewith. The flaps 21, 22 on each side of the the latter being operable as lift flaps in addition to ful­ aircraft may be moved differentially to enable the jet filling their normal function. The flaps arc operated by thrust to augment the aileron effect or they may be a handle 122 connected by chain-and-sprocket to a moved simultaneously downwards to act as flaps and screwed shaft 120 carrying sleeves 119 connected to to cause the downwardly directed jet thrust to pro­ The flap 1 is mounted at 2, 3 on links 4, 5, the link 4 the ends of levers 117, whose other ends'arc connected duce increased lift. The flaps may be hinged diver­ being pivoted at 6 to the wing and the link S bicng to links 116 operating the flaps. The levers 117 arc gently to reduce the thrust and to act as dive brakes. pivoted at 10 to an arm 11 of a bell-crank lever 12 connected to further levers 127 operating links 126 Specification 590,799 is referred to. pivoted at 13 on the link 4, and extension of the flap I connected to the ailerons, so that simultaneous move­ is controlled by a rod 14. Tle element 15 is pivoted on ment of the latter also results from operation of the an extension of the pivot 13 on a plate 16, also pivoted 626,454. Aircraft propeller drives. United Aircraft handle 122. Differential movement of the ailerons is at 13. The plate 16 may be turned about the pivot 13 Corporation. Jan. 4, 1946, No. 333. Convention date obtained by movement of a link 134 connected to one by a bell-crank lever 20, 23, pivoted to the plate at 20, Feb. 17, 1945. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIV.) end of a lever 131 whose other end is pivoted to the to the wing at 22, and to the arm 25 of the bell-crank mid-point of a further link 130 connecting the levers 12, at 24. A hydraulic, mechanical, or other jack 17 connected between the element 15 and the plate 16 controls the inclination of the element 15, the jack preferably having an internal abutment limiting its stroke. The clement 15 may be movable to a position perpendicular to the wing, the jack being 17 then of the type described in Specification 625,913. A fluid- pressure control system by which the normal controls control the elements 15 when the flaps 1 arc operated is described. Two engines 26, 28 in an aircraft arc coupled through driving shafts 34, transmission means 30, 32, 625,913. Controlling aircraft. Soc. d'lnventions driven shafts 36 and bevel gears and shafting as shown, Acronautiques et Mccaniques S.l.A.M. Sept. 12, to two propellers 10, 12, so that either or both engines 1946, No. 27,437. Convention date Jan. 7, 1942. may be used to drive the propellers in cither of two (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXIX.) speed ratios. Each of the transmission means 30, 32 is Hydraulic control gear for aircraft wing-flaps com­ controlled by hydraulic clutches operated by the pres­ prises a jack cylinder 1 having an operating piston 15 sure of a pump driven by both the corresponding and an additional chamber 8 with a piston 6, at one driving shaft 34 and the driven shaft 36 or by which­ end, for actuating the piston 15 over part of its stroke ever of these may be rotating, as described in Group to afford an intermediate setting of the flaps 29, as XXIV, the distribution of the pressure supply from shown in FIG 4. The minor side of the piston 15 is un­ the pump being effected by a'valve controlled by the der constant hydraulic pressure from an accumulator pilot to provide two forward speed ratios and neutral. 626,780. Aerofoils. Griffith, A. A. April 25, 1947. No. 11,175. (Class 4.) (Also in Group XXVI.) An aerofoil suitable for use at supersonic velocities is generated from a basic section of lozenge, triangular or similar form by machining a plane surface 14 on one or both sides so that the ratio of maximum thick­ ness to chord decreases towards the tip 12. The chord is constant from the tip 12 to the root 10. The basic section may be elongated diamond or biconvex form, or may alternatively be of elongated triangular or plano-convex form with a single plane surface 14 machined on the side opposite the base. Alternative positions of the root 10 arc indicated at 18 and 19. 382 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1952

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