Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 362,453 . Oil engines; cylinders. Royce, pas s aft of the engine through the front frame Sir F. H., Nightingale Road, Derby. Sept. 4, an d taper rearwardly in width and depth. The 1930, No . 26399. [Classes 7 (ii) an d 7 (iii).] nacelle mountings are braced to the wing spars Scavenging air enters b y wires K attache d t o lugs D6 fixed t o th e clamping plate s D3 of the leading strut and the ring D of a two-stroke cylinder by th e trailing strut. Two or more nacelles may be tangentia l ports c3 and staye d apart laterally by struts L, Fig. 2, having exhaus t leaves b y one or sleeves L1 and locating blocks L2 clamped between more ports in a substan­ th e rings D, D1. In a modification, Fig. 5, the tially cylindrical com­ bustion chamber a3 into which liquid fuel is in­ jecte d by a transversely- arrange d injector c. A shoulde r aa2 is closely approache d by the pis­ ton , the clearance being thu s limited to th e com­ bustio n chamber a3 stru t and nacelle frames are combined, being com­ which preferably con­ posed of outer strips of metal M, M1 connected by tain s one large exhaust Hanged webs N, N1. Webs N, N1 are shaped to valv e b. Air is supplied form a central opening, ovoid in the case of the b y a blower t o a cham- front strut and circular for the rear strut. The be r e. The injector c strip s M, M1 may be laminated. Fairings are provided for the interplane and internacelle struts ma y have a single orifice and be radial or tangential o r alternatively, struts of streamline section may t o th e chamber a3. b e employed. The space within th e nacelle behind 363,109 . Mounting nacelles on aircraft. Fig . 2, so tha t they can be operated either by a Short, A. E., and Short, H. O., Seaplane Works, single lobe 64 o r b y four lobes 59 on a cam 56. The Rochester , Kent. Nov. 29, 1930, No. 35983. lobe 64 is carried a t one end of a n arm 54 pivoted a t [Class 4.] 55 and carrying a t the other end a weight 65 held Nacelles are mounted on the interplane struts agains t a casing 51 by a spring 66. The lobe 64 of multiplane aircraft by means of frames carried extend s through a peripheral opening in a cam b y tandem single struts, each strut being provided structur e consisting of members 51, 52 attache d to wit h an independent frame shaped to receive the th e crankshaft, and between which the arm 54 is skin of the nacelle which extends between the pivoted . The cam 56 is rotatably mounted on an struts . Tandem interplane struts B, B1, Fig. 1, extension of the member 52 an d is driven through of circular section carry sleeves C, C1 formed with reductio n gearing 60 . . 63 a t one-eighth crankshaft flat-sided locating blocks C2, C3, respectively, to speed in the opposite direction to th e crank shaft. which are clamped rings D, D1, Fig. 4, clamping Durin g slow running (i.e. below 1,400 r.p.m.), the plate s D2, D 3 being provided for the rings of the ca m lobe 64 is in th e position shown in th e full lines leading strut. The nacelle comprises overlapping in Fig. 3, and actuates th e levers 41 . As this lobe annula r metal sheets E, E1 . . E9, the junctions 64 is rotated a t crankshaft speed, it gives a faster betwee n the sheets being strengthened by angle- injection stroke to the pump plunger than that section hoops F. The sections E3, E8 fit round given by the slow moving lobes 59. As th e speed th e frames carried by the leading and trailing of revolution increases, th e lobe 64 becomes ineffec­ struts , respectively. The upper portions of sections th e engine may accommodate liquid fuel or oil tive , centrifugal force withdrawing it into th e cam E . . E 3 are cut away along a line E10, a hinged tank s and may house a starter motor. According structure , as shown by the dotted lines in Fig. 3, cowling G being provided for this portion. An t o the Provisional Specification, steel or other an d then the cam lobes 59 actuate the levers 41 . engine H is mounte d on seats comprising horizontal blocks may be mounted beneath the bearers I, I1 Th e lobe 64 is fixed on the crankshaft to lift the plates , I, I1, Fig. 2, and vertical plates I2, I3 fixed for attachment to the engine feet. rocker levers before they contact with th e lobes 59, t o the inside of the nacelle body. These seats 363,891 . Oil Engines. Packard Motor Car Co., Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A. Feb. 16, 1931, No . 4896. Convention date, April 2, 1930. [Classes 7 (ii), 7 (iii), 7 (v), an d 7 (vi).] Th e plunger of a fuel-injection pump is operated a t different speeds relative to the speed of rotation of the crankshaft by a pair of cams, the cam in use a t the lower speed operating th e pum p plunger durin g normal running of the engine, and the cam in use a t the higher speed operating the plunger durin g slow running of the engine. In a radial- cylinder four-stroke engine, fuel is fed by a low- pressur e pump from a reservoir into a manifold 34 which is connected to fuel pumps associated with each cylinder. An overflow conduit 35 connected t o th e uppermost cylinder conducts excess fuel back thu s causing the lobes 59 to pass under the levers t o the reservoir. Fuel is drawn into pump barrels ineffectively, and th e lobes 59 ar e made so long tha t 30 when an inlet port 32 is uncovered by the th e levers ride on them after being raised by the plunger 31, an d is forced by the plunger through a lobe 64 so tha t th e lobe 64 operates only every other nozzle A after the plunger has closed the port 32. rocke r in each revolution. Between injection Each nozzle A an d pum p B ar e formed as a n integral strokes , the rockers contact with a base circle 56 structure . To vary the length of the plunger t o allow th e pump s t o fill wit h oil. The cam lobe 64 * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently stroke , each plunger bears on a spring-pressed ha s a gradually rising face to reduce shocks caused published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery membe r 36 and is actuated from a curved face 43 Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified b y th e contact of th e lobe with th e rocker levers. into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from of a rocker lever 41 throug h a link 40 an d a plunger- Crank casings.—A partition 12 in a barrel crank- the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, actuatin g rod 39. The link 40 is adjusted on the case 11 separates the compartment 13 containing either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of face 43 by turning a ring 44 to which is fixed a link 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of th e connecting-rods from a compartment 14 con­ the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, 45 joined to the link 40. The ring 44 is moved by tainin g the accessories. A rear cover 15 provided price 1s. each. a rack and pinion 48 operated by a lever 49. The wit h apertures 16 enables th e engine to be fixed to Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ levers 41 are provided with lateral extensions 67, panied by drawings if none is reproduced. a suitable support. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 4 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1932

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/month-in-the-patent-office-MuZH1M4uBq
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029575
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 362,453 . Oil engines; cylinders. Royce, pas s aft of the engine through the front frame Sir F. H., Nightingale Road, Derby. Sept. 4, an d taper rearwardly in width and depth. The 1930, No . 26399. [Classes 7 (ii) an d 7 (iii).] nacelle mountings are braced to the wing spars Scavenging air enters b y wires K attache d t o lugs D6 fixed t o th e clamping plate s D3 of the leading strut and the ring D of a two-stroke cylinder by th e trailing strut. Two or more nacelles may be tangentia l ports c3 and staye d apart laterally by struts L, Fig. 2, having exhaus t leaves b y one or sleeves L1 and locating blocks L2 clamped between more ports in a substan­ th e rings D, D1. In a modification, Fig. 5, the tially cylindrical com­ bustion chamber a3 into which liquid fuel is in­ jecte d by a transversely- arrange d injector c. A shoulde r aa2 is closely approache d by the pis­ ton , the clearance being thu s limited to th e com­ bustio n chamber a3 stru t and nacelle frames are combined, being com­ which preferably con­ posed of outer strips of metal M, M1 connected by tain s one large exhaust Hanged webs N, N1. Webs N, N1 are shaped to valv e b. Air is supplied form a central opening, ovoid in the case of the b y a blower t o a cham- front strut and circular for the rear strut. The be r e. The injector c strip s M, M1 may be laminated. Fairings are provided for the interplane and internacelle struts ma y have a single orifice and be radial or tangential o r alternatively, struts of streamline section may t o th e chamber a3. b e employed. The space within th e nacelle behind 363,109 . Mounting nacelles on aircraft. Fig . 2, so tha t they can be operated either by a Short, A. E., and Short, H. O., Seaplane Works, single lobe 64 o r b y four lobes 59 on a cam 56. The Rochester , Kent. Nov. 29, 1930, No. 35983. lobe 64 is carried a t one end of a n arm 54 pivoted a t [Class 4.] 55 and carrying a t the other end a weight 65 held Nacelles are mounted on the interplane struts agains t a casing 51 by a spring 66. The lobe 64 of multiplane aircraft by means of frames carried extend s through a peripheral opening in a cam b y tandem single struts, each strut being provided structur e consisting of members 51, 52 attache d to wit h an independent frame shaped to receive the th e crankshaft, and between which the arm 54 is skin of the nacelle which extends between the pivoted . The cam 56 is rotatably mounted on an struts . Tandem interplane struts B, B1, Fig. 1, extension of the member 52 an d is driven through of circular section carry sleeves C, C1 formed with reductio n gearing 60 . . 63 a t one-eighth crankshaft flat-sided locating blocks C2, C3, respectively, to speed in the opposite direction to th e crank shaft. which are clamped rings D, D1, Fig. 4, clamping Durin g slow running (i.e. below 1,400 r.p.m.), the plate s D2, D 3 being provided for the rings of the ca m lobe 64 is in th e position shown in th e full lines leading strut. The nacelle comprises overlapping in Fig. 3, and actuates th e levers 41 . As this lobe annula r metal sheets E, E1 . . E9, the junctions 64 is rotated a t crankshaft speed, it gives a faster betwee n the sheets being strengthened by angle- injection stroke to the pump plunger than that section hoops F. The sections E3, E8 fit round given by the slow moving lobes 59. As th e speed th e frames carried by the leading and trailing of revolution increases, th e lobe 64 becomes ineffec­ struts , respectively. The upper portions of sections th e engine may accommodate liquid fuel or oil tive , centrifugal force withdrawing it into th e cam E . . E 3 are cut away along a line E10, a hinged tank s and may house a starter motor. According structure , as shown by the dotted lines in Fig. 3, cowling G being provided for this portion. An t o the Provisional Specification, steel or other an d then the cam lobes 59 actuate the levers 41 . engine H is mounte d on seats comprising horizontal blocks may be mounted beneath the bearers I, I1 Th e lobe 64 is fixed on the crankshaft to lift the plates , I, I1, Fig. 2, and vertical plates I2, I3 fixed for attachment to the engine feet. rocker levers before they contact with th e lobes 59, t o the inside of the nacelle body. These seats 363,891 . Oil Engines. Packard Motor Car Co., Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A. Feb. 16, 1931, No . 4896. Convention date, April 2, 1930. [Classes 7 (ii), 7 (iii), 7 (v), an d 7 (vi).] Th e plunger of a fuel-injection pump is operated a t different speeds relative to the speed of rotation of the crankshaft by a pair of cams, the cam in use a t the lower speed operating th e pum p plunger durin g normal running of the engine, and the cam in use a t the higher speed operating the plunger durin g slow running of the engine. In a radial- cylinder four-stroke engine, fuel is fed by a low- pressur e pump from a reservoir into a manifold 34 which is connected to fuel pumps associated with each cylinder. An overflow conduit 35 connected t o th e uppermost cylinder conducts excess fuel back thu s causing the lobes 59 to pass under the levers t o the reservoir. Fuel is drawn into pump barrels ineffectively, and th e lobes 59 ar e made so long tha t 30 when an inlet port 32 is uncovered by the th e levers ride on them after being raised by the plunger 31, an d is forced by the plunger through a lobe 64 so tha t th e lobe 64 operates only every other nozzle A after the plunger has closed the port 32. rocke r in each revolution. Between injection Each nozzle A an d pum p B ar e formed as a n integral strokes , the rockers contact with a base circle 56 structure . To vary the length of the plunger t o allow th e pump s t o fill wit h oil. The cam lobe 64 * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently stroke , each plunger bears on a spring-pressed ha s a gradually rising face to reduce shocks caused published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery membe r 36 and is actuated from a curved face 43 Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified b y th e contact of th e lobe with th e rocker levers. into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from of a rocker lever 41 throug h a link 40 an d a plunger- Crank casings.—A partition 12 in a barrel crank- the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, actuatin g rod 39. The link 40 is adjusted on the case 11 separates the compartment 13 containing either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of face 43 by turning a ring 44 to which is fixed a link 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of th e connecting-rods from a compartment 14 con­ the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, 45 joined to the link 40. The ring 44 is moved by tainin g the accessories. A rear cover 15 provided price 1s. each. a rack and pinion 48 operated by a lever 49. The wit h apertures 16 enables th e engine to be fixed to Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ levers 41 are provided with lateral extensions 67, panied by drawings if none is reproduced. a suitable support.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1932

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month