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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING March, 1931 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently interior of the superstructures. These may 336,795 . Indicating and recording hav e a stressed outer covering, Fig. 9, or com­ torsiona l vibration of shafts. Gerard, I . J., prise an internal structure w, Fig. 11, and an and Carter, B . C , Royal Aircraft Establishment, South Farnborough, Hampshire, and Mansell, outer envelope v. H. C, Rathgar, Ashley Road, Walton-on- Thames. Oct. 17, 1929. No. 31565. [Class 106 (ii).] Dynamometers, rotary transmission: with tra l mirror 7 describes a circle representing no recording-apparatus.—Comprises a construction torque . The reference mirror 17 is adjusted to of the type in which the torsional vibrations give a concentric circle jus t within th e boundary of a shaft are used to tilt a mirror reflecting a of the screen. The radial distance from zero beam of light on to a screen of photographic position to the diagram is a measure of the plate. torque . Vibration of the shaft itself will pro­ A stiff tube 1 is inserted into a hollow duce irregularities in the inner circle and peaks Ladders.—Upright internal members of these air screw or like shaft 2 an d secured at the inner are produced corresponding to the number of superstructures are adapted to serve as ladders. end by a taper bolt 3 which is drawn into the firing impulses per revolution. Fig. 10 shows a wall t of a shaft s, Fig. 9, pro­ split end of the tube by differential screws 5, vided with footholes u, and Fig. 12 shows a 6 engaging respectively the bolt and tube to girder y forming part of th e structures w, Fig. 11, 338,043 . Aeroplanes. Dornier Metall- expand the latter into firm connection with the having treaded strips v. shaft. A mirror 7 is mounted on a carrier 8 bauten, Ges., and Dornier, C , Friedrichshafen, pivoted on an axis 9 formed by pointed screw Lake Constance, Germany. Dec. 23, 1929, 21 in a frame 10 adjustable in turn about a No. 39343. Convention date, April 20. 338,495 . Aeroplane Brakes. Bam [Classes 4 and 20 (ii).] bridge, F. E. A. 20, Clifton Road, Maida Vale, London. Aug. 13, 1929, Nos. 24699/29 and Planes, arrangement and construction of; pro­ 5644/30. [Class 4.] pelling.—Aeroplanes are provided either above or below, or above and below the principal wing with streamlined superstructures carrying gon­ dolas serving for th e accommodation of engines, weapons, etc., the superstructures or gondolas being interconnected by means of connecting members parallel to the principal wing and streamlined to act as supporting planes. Fig. 2 shows gondolas c mounted on super­ structures b and interconnected by members c, joints being provided at f. Fig. 6 illustrates a modification in which gondolas c are mounted on a continuous connecting wing d which may be extended in span beyond the outer gondolas. Gondolas h may similarly be mounted beneath the second axis at right-angles to the first and main wing a, the outer gondolas carrying formed by two sockets on the frame engaging floats two balls 12 on a housing 13 bolted to an adaptor secured to the outer end of the shaft 2. Th e connecting members d, i may A pin 15 parallel t o the axis 9 engages a longi­ be braced as shown or alternatively, when the tudinal slot in the outer end of the tube 1 member d is provided with an extension this The axle of an aeroplane under-carriage is which is supported in a self-aligning bearing 16. may be braced by struts from the gondola and fitted with wheel brakes and is slidably mounted A second mirror 17 is adjustably and eccentric­ from the main wing a a t the point of connection in slots formed in brackets fixed to the aero­ of the main bracing strut shown in Fig. 2. A ally mounted on a ring 18 mad e in th e form of a plane and arranged substantially parallel to crawling passage r, Fig. 7, is arranged in the socket bearing on the ball 19 of th e housing 13. th e longitudinal axis thereof, the arrangement wing a and communicates with passages in the A V-shaped camera box 23 is mounted over the being such tha t the reaction between the wheel housing 13 with only a running clearance. and the ground as the tail falls on landing causes the axle to move upwards in the slots The beam from a spot light 24 passes down one t o apply the brake. In one form an axle a, lim b of the box to the mirrors and is reflected Fig. 1, is mounted in slots e formed in brackets along the other limb to a ground glass or photo ­ b attached to the aeroplane by struts d. As graphic plate 25. A falling shutter 26 is th e tail of the aircraft falls on landing the axle provided with a slot which may be adjusted is forced upwards in the slots to the position t o engine speed so as to cover not more than shown and a cam k mounted on a shaft c which two revolutions. passes through a slot f formed in the stationary Th e mirrors are adjusted so that when the par t of the brake causes spreading of the brake shaft rotates slowly, light reflected from the cen- shoes. If the tail of the aircraft rises changing th e position of the slots the axle is enabled to move rearwardly to release the brake. An * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently over-riding control h is provided for releasing the published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed brake when the tail rests on the ground. copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent According to a modification a further slot may Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, price one shilling each. be provided in the bracket to receive the pin of Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied th e braking mechanism. by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 3 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1931

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029382
Publisher site
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Abstract

AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING March, 1931 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently interior of the superstructures. These may 336,795 . Indicating and recording hav e a stressed outer covering, Fig. 9, or com­ torsiona l vibration of shafts. Gerard, I . J., prise an internal structure w, Fig. 11, and an and Carter, B . C , Royal Aircraft Establishment, South Farnborough, Hampshire, and Mansell, outer envelope v. H. C, Rathgar, Ashley Road, Walton-on- Thames. Oct. 17, 1929. No. 31565. [Class 106 (ii).] Dynamometers, rotary transmission: with tra l mirror 7 describes a circle representing no recording-apparatus.—Comprises a construction torque . The reference mirror 17 is adjusted to of the type in which the torsional vibrations give a concentric circle jus t within th e boundary of a shaft are used to tilt a mirror reflecting a of the screen. The radial distance from zero beam of light on to a screen of photographic position to the diagram is a measure of the plate. torque . Vibration of the shaft itself will pro­ A stiff tube 1 is inserted into a hollow duce irregularities in the inner circle and peaks Ladders.—Upright internal members of these air screw or like shaft 2 an d secured at the inner are produced corresponding to the number of superstructures are adapted to serve as ladders. end by a taper bolt 3 which is drawn into the firing impulses per revolution. Fig. 10 shows a wall t of a shaft s, Fig. 9, pro­ split end of the tube by differential screws 5, vided with footholes u, and Fig. 12 shows a 6 engaging respectively the bolt and tube to girder y forming part of th e structures w, Fig. 11, 338,043 . Aeroplanes. Dornier Metall- expand the latter into firm connection with the having treaded strips v. shaft. A mirror 7 is mounted on a carrier 8 bauten, Ges., and Dornier, C , Friedrichshafen, pivoted on an axis 9 formed by pointed screw Lake Constance, Germany. Dec. 23, 1929, 21 in a frame 10 adjustable in turn about a No. 39343. Convention date, April 20. 338,495 . Aeroplane Brakes. Bam [Classes 4 and 20 (ii).] bridge, F. E. A. 20, Clifton Road, Maida Vale, London. Aug. 13, 1929, Nos. 24699/29 and Planes, arrangement and construction of; pro­ 5644/30. [Class 4.] pelling.—Aeroplanes are provided either above or below, or above and below the principal wing with streamlined superstructures carrying gon­ dolas serving for th e accommodation of engines, weapons, etc., the superstructures or gondolas being interconnected by means of connecting members parallel to the principal wing and streamlined to act as supporting planes. Fig. 2 shows gondolas c mounted on super­ structures b and interconnected by members c, joints being provided at f. Fig. 6 illustrates a modification in which gondolas c are mounted on a continuous connecting wing d which may be extended in span beyond the outer gondolas. Gondolas h may similarly be mounted beneath the second axis at right-angles to the first and main wing a, the outer gondolas carrying formed by two sockets on the frame engaging floats two balls 12 on a housing 13 bolted to an adaptor secured to the outer end of the shaft 2. Th e connecting members d, i may A pin 15 parallel t o the axis 9 engages a longi­ be braced as shown or alternatively, when the tudinal slot in the outer end of the tube 1 member d is provided with an extension this The axle of an aeroplane under-carriage is which is supported in a self-aligning bearing 16. may be braced by struts from the gondola and fitted with wheel brakes and is slidably mounted A second mirror 17 is adjustably and eccentric­ from the main wing a a t the point of connection in slots formed in brackets fixed to the aero­ of the main bracing strut shown in Fig. 2. A ally mounted on a ring 18 mad e in th e form of a plane and arranged substantially parallel to crawling passage r, Fig. 7, is arranged in the socket bearing on the ball 19 of th e housing 13. th e longitudinal axis thereof, the arrangement wing a and communicates with passages in the A V-shaped camera box 23 is mounted over the being such tha t the reaction between the wheel housing 13 with only a running clearance. and the ground as the tail falls on landing causes the axle to move upwards in the slots The beam from a spot light 24 passes down one t o apply the brake. In one form an axle a, lim b of the box to the mirrors and is reflected Fig. 1, is mounted in slots e formed in brackets along the other limb to a ground glass or photo ­ b attached to the aeroplane by struts d. As graphic plate 25. A falling shutter 26 is th e tail of the aircraft falls on landing the axle provided with a slot which may be adjusted is forced upwards in the slots to the position t o engine speed so as to cover not more than shown and a cam k mounted on a shaft c which two revolutions. passes through a slot f formed in the stationary Th e mirrors are adjusted so that when the par t of the brake causes spreading of the brake shaft rotates slowly, light reflected from the cen- shoes. If the tail of the aircraft rises changing th e position of the slots the axle is enabled to move rearwardly to release the brake. An * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently over-riding control h is provided for releasing the published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed brake when the tail rests on the ground. copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent According to a modification a further slot may Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, price one shilling each. be provided in the bracket to receive the pin of Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied th e braking mechanism. by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1931

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