Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 176 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1934 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently Ruislip—all in Middlesex. Dec. 22, 1932, No. each pivoted a t one end T3 to the coupling member 402,236 . Aircraft framework. A. T. S. Co., and at the other to a piston T1. The ends T3 are Ltd. , 5, Clement's Inn, Strand, London; Dobson, 36329. [Class 4.] R. H., Ashgrove, Hollinwood, Lancashire; and concentrically arranged about the point P1, which A small amount of free lost motion is provided between the means for directly actuating an aircraft control surface and the means for actuating a servo flap thereon. A lever c connected by a link e to the pilot's control and by a link f to a servo-flap g has also telescopic connections h, j to arm s k on the main control surface. The con­ nections h, j may bo replaced by short chains, or ther e may be an angular gap between the lever c an d abutments on the control surface. Alterna­ tivel y th e lever c ma y have a pin-and-slo t connection t o an arm on one side of the pivot axis of the contro l surface. 403,380 . Regulating. Fedden, A. H. R., and Bristol Aeroplane Co., Ltd., Filton House, Bristol. Jun e 16, 1932, No. 17077. [Class 7 (vi).] I n engines with supercharging or with a high compression-ratio, and having separate regulating- valve s for fuel and air, manual means arc provided in connection with both valves, means actuated b y the pressure in the induction pipe also operate on both valves, while an altitude control operates is central, or approximately central, of the member Wylie, H. N., 5, Clement's Inn. Strand, London. 5 . The points P1, Q1, R1 are equally spaced from Oct . 28, 1932, No. 30298. [Class 4.] th e shafts P , Q, R, and all points of the member A tube or other structural member particularly S move in a circular path . The path s of th e points for use in aircraft is made from one or a number Q1, R1 intersect that of the point P1 and may of lengths of sheet metal rolled, drawn or pressed intersec t each other. The whole of the power t o shape and having outwardly flanged edges, ma y be supplied to, or taken from the shaft P, adjacent flanges being connected together by th e shafts Q, R serving only to control the move­ electric resistance welding and some or all of the men t of the shaft S, of the motion of two or all joints so formed being subsequently pressed in­ of the shafts P, Q, R may be externally utilised. wards so tha t they are accommodated within the Fo r example, all the shafts may carry gear-wheels contour of the member. In one form, a stream­ engaging a single-driven gear-wheel, or one or lined strut may be formed by welding the flanges mor e shafts may drive auxiliary apparatus such of two shaped strips of metal 8, 9 together and a s water-circulating pumps, oil pumps, ignition the n bending the flanges over and pressing them apparatus , or electrical equipment. down into the contour as in Fig. 2 or pressing them edgewise into the strut. In the latter case the depth of the flange may be decreased in th e process. I n a further modification a boom is formed from 403,163 . Airscrews. Fairey Aviation Co., five strips of metal, the seams 18 (Fig. 4) being Ltd. , Cranford Lane, Hayes, Middlesex, and pressed in and the flanges 17 being employed to Broadbent , W., 94, Shakespeare Road, Hanwell, join the booms to the web. The various members London. July 23, 1932, No. 20816. [Class 114.] ma y be formed of annealed metal, which is subse­ Means for indicating the position of an airscrew quentl y hardened by heat treatment. According blade in its socket, consists in the provision of a t o the Provisional Specification, a tube made in vernie r disposition of slots or holes in the two th e manner set out may be heat treated by the parts , into aligned holes of which a pin may be electric resistance process described in Specifications placed. The root a of the airscrew blade B is 207,279 and 240,902 [both in Class 83 (iv), Metals, formed with a series of holes b1, b2, b3 and b4, the Working] . axi s of which lie in a plane inclined to the longi­ on the fuel valve only. The invention is especially tudina l axis of the blade. The hub c is formed applicable to engines in which liquid fuel is in­ wit h a longitudinal slot d, the length of which is jected into the cylinders or into the induction 402,941 . Controlling aircraft. Fairey Avia­ equal to the over-all length of the series of holes tion Co., Ltd., Cranford Lane, Hayes; Williams, pipes. A lever 10 (Fig. 2) connected to the pilot's so tha t a pin may be passed through the slot d contro l is also connected by an arm 11 and toggle D . L. H., Hillside, Swakeley's Road, Ickenham; int o one of said holes which is in register therewith. links 12 13 to an arm 14 on a shaft 15 which an d Ordidge, F. H., Soircroft, Croft Gardens, If desired a second series of holes b3, b6, b7, b8, operate s the air-regulating valves, and which also an d a second slit d1 may be formed in the root carries another arm 14 (Fig. 3), which is connected an d hub to provide a greater range of angular b y toggle links 16, 17, bell crank 18, 19, and a adjustment . Alternatively the holes in the root rod 20, t o the fuel-pump control 21 . The automatic and hub may be formed circumferentially and dis­ device 34 actuated by induction-pipe pressure is posed vernier fashion. connected by a rod 36, arms 25, 26, and rod 24 t o the centre of th e toggle links 12, 13, so tha t the shaft 15 is actuated at low altitude to reduce the permissible opening of the air valve and also the fuel adjustment. In addition to this, a barometric device 35 is connected by rods 37, 38, arm s 28, 29, and a rod 27 t o the centre of the toggle links 16, 17, so as to adjust the fuel pumps automatically at all altitudes in accordance with the barometric pressure. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published arc specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationer Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from 404,272 . Driving-gear. Ricardo, H. R., the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, 21 , Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. May 26, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 1932, No . 14972. [Class 7 (ii).] 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, Thre e parallel crankshafts P, Q, R are connected price 1s. each. b y a coupling member 5 pivoted to them at points Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ P 1 , Q1, R1 off their axes, connecting rods T2 being panied by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 6 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1934

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029814
Publisher site
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Abstract

176 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1934 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently Ruislip—all in Middlesex. Dec. 22, 1932, No. each pivoted a t one end T3 to the coupling member 402,236 . Aircraft framework. A. T. S. Co., and at the other to a piston T1. The ends T3 are Ltd. , 5, Clement's Inn, Strand, London; Dobson, 36329. [Class 4.] R. H., Ashgrove, Hollinwood, Lancashire; and concentrically arranged about the point P1, which A small amount of free lost motion is provided between the means for directly actuating an aircraft control surface and the means for actuating a servo flap thereon. A lever c connected by a link e to the pilot's control and by a link f to a servo-flap g has also telescopic connections h, j to arm s k on the main control surface. The con­ nections h, j may bo replaced by short chains, or ther e may be an angular gap between the lever c an d abutments on the control surface. Alterna­ tivel y th e lever c ma y have a pin-and-slo t connection t o an arm on one side of the pivot axis of the contro l surface. 403,380 . Regulating. Fedden, A. H. R., and Bristol Aeroplane Co., Ltd., Filton House, Bristol. Jun e 16, 1932, No. 17077. [Class 7 (vi).] I n engines with supercharging or with a high compression-ratio, and having separate regulating- valve s for fuel and air, manual means arc provided in connection with both valves, means actuated b y the pressure in the induction pipe also operate on both valves, while an altitude control operates is central, or approximately central, of the member Wylie, H. N., 5, Clement's Inn. Strand, London. 5 . The points P1, Q1, R1 are equally spaced from Oct . 28, 1932, No. 30298. [Class 4.] th e shafts P , Q, R, and all points of the member A tube or other structural member particularly S move in a circular path . The path s of th e points for use in aircraft is made from one or a number Q1, R1 intersect that of the point P1 and may of lengths of sheet metal rolled, drawn or pressed intersec t each other. The whole of the power t o shape and having outwardly flanged edges, ma y be supplied to, or taken from the shaft P, adjacent flanges being connected together by th e shafts Q, R serving only to control the move­ electric resistance welding and some or all of the men t of the shaft S, of the motion of two or all joints so formed being subsequently pressed in­ of the shafts P, Q, R may be externally utilised. wards so tha t they are accommodated within the Fo r example, all the shafts may carry gear-wheels contour of the member. In one form, a stream­ engaging a single-driven gear-wheel, or one or lined strut may be formed by welding the flanges mor e shafts may drive auxiliary apparatus such of two shaped strips of metal 8, 9 together and a s water-circulating pumps, oil pumps, ignition the n bending the flanges over and pressing them apparatus , or electrical equipment. down into the contour as in Fig. 2 or pressing them edgewise into the strut. In the latter case the depth of the flange may be decreased in th e process. I n a further modification a boom is formed from 403,163 . Airscrews. Fairey Aviation Co., five strips of metal, the seams 18 (Fig. 4) being Ltd. , Cranford Lane, Hayes, Middlesex, and pressed in and the flanges 17 being employed to Broadbent , W., 94, Shakespeare Road, Hanwell, join the booms to the web. The various members London. July 23, 1932, No. 20816. [Class 114.] ma y be formed of annealed metal, which is subse­ Means for indicating the position of an airscrew quentl y hardened by heat treatment. According blade in its socket, consists in the provision of a t o the Provisional Specification, a tube made in vernie r disposition of slots or holes in the two th e manner set out may be heat treated by the parts , into aligned holes of which a pin may be electric resistance process described in Specifications placed. The root a of the airscrew blade B is 207,279 and 240,902 [both in Class 83 (iv), Metals, formed with a series of holes b1, b2, b3 and b4, the Working] . axi s of which lie in a plane inclined to the longi­ on the fuel valve only. The invention is especially tudina l axis of the blade. The hub c is formed applicable to engines in which liquid fuel is in­ wit h a longitudinal slot d, the length of which is jected into the cylinders or into the induction 402,941 . Controlling aircraft. Fairey Avia­ equal to the over-all length of the series of holes tion Co., Ltd., Cranford Lane, Hayes; Williams, pipes. A lever 10 (Fig. 2) connected to the pilot's so tha t a pin may be passed through the slot d contro l is also connected by an arm 11 and toggle D . L. H., Hillside, Swakeley's Road, Ickenham; int o one of said holes which is in register therewith. links 12 13 to an arm 14 on a shaft 15 which an d Ordidge, F. H., Soircroft, Croft Gardens, If desired a second series of holes b3, b6, b7, b8, operate s the air-regulating valves, and which also an d a second slit d1 may be formed in the root carries another arm 14 (Fig. 3), which is connected an d hub to provide a greater range of angular b y toggle links 16, 17, bell crank 18, 19, and a adjustment . Alternatively the holes in the root rod 20, t o the fuel-pump control 21 . The automatic and hub may be formed circumferentially and dis­ device 34 actuated by induction-pipe pressure is posed vernier fashion. connected by a rod 36, arms 25, 26, and rod 24 t o the centre of th e toggle links 12, 13, so tha t the shaft 15 is actuated at low altitude to reduce the permissible opening of the air valve and also the fuel adjustment. In addition to this, a barometric device 35 is connected by rods 37, 38, arm s 28, 29, and a rod 27 t o the centre of the toggle links 16, 17, so as to adjust the fuel pumps automatically at all altitudes in accordance with the barometric pressure. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published arc specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationer Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from 404,272 . Driving-gear. Ricardo, H. R., the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2, 21 , Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. May 26, either sheet by sheet as issued, on payment of a subscription of 1932, No . 14972. [Class 7 (ii).] 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, Thre e parallel crankshafts P, Q, R are connected price 1s. each. b y a coupling member 5 pivoted to them at points Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ P 1 , Q1, R1 off their axes, connecting rods T2 being panied by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1934

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