Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office the pedal 311 is not depressed the universal joint between the lever 16 and the link 17 lies on the axis of the shaft 8 and the rudder is locked. When the pedal is depressed, the universal joint is displaced from the axis of the shaft 8 so that rotation of the shaft by the These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared control member 1 causes motion of the rudder 23, the abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, velocity ratio being determined by the extent of 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies depression of the pedal 311. of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each 605,968. Engine driving-gear. A. C. Elliott and J. P. Treen. Dec. 7, 1945, No. 33189. (Class 7 (ii).) 605,112. Regulating. J. Lucas, Ltd. and R. J. (Also in Groups XXIV and XXVIII.) Ifield. Dec. 27, 1945, No. 34,919. The flow of liquid Mechanism for converting reciprocating into rotary fuel from a variable delivery pump to the nozzle in a motion or vice versa and particularly applicable to combustion chamber of a prime mover is controlled by engines, pumps and compressors, comprises a recipro­ passing the fuel through a valve and a variable orifice, cating member 9, FIGS. 1 and 2, which is connected regulating the pump delivery by the pressure drop set to oppositely rotating crank discs 1, 1 by means of a up across the orifice and varying the orifice in response transversely arranged member 6, 61 mounted for a to air blower pressure, and controlling the valve certain amount of pivotal movement on pins 7. As by manually adjustable and temperature-responsive shown, the member 9 comprises a crosshead of a means. piston 12 and works in a guide 10 and the discs 1, 1 are provided with gear teeth 17 for co-operating with suitable gearing for the transmission of power. During its reciprocation the member 9 is also given a partial rotation and this may be utilized as shown in FIG. 4 to enable ports 14 in an extension 13 of the piston head 12 to control the admission and expulsion of gases in co-operation with ports 15 in the cylinder. In a multi-cylinder radial engine all the side discs on each side of a bank of cylinders are geared to a com­ mon collection wheel and in a multi-bank arrangement such a collection wheel may also be common to two adjacent banks of cylinders. These collection wheels may be interconnected by bevel gears the shafts of which may serve for driving the engine valve gear. Specification 6719/06 (Class 7) is referred to. off-centre position by the spring 11, having a groove 14 which is engaged in the off-centre position by an extension 13 of the starter solenoid plunger 20 which when energized rises out of engagement with the said groove 14 and compresses the spring 32 through the lever 31 so pressing the member 27 into a groove 28 in the shaft 4 and holding it in the centred position. This centering movement partially engages the pinion 47 with the engine gear 48, the full meshing of the gears 47, and 48, and the closing of the clutch 52, 53 being effected by the nut 49 on the screwed sleeve 39. When the engine fires and the pinion 47 is acclerated above the speed of the starter, the pinion 605,127. Ventilation systems for aircraft. Westland partially breaks mesh with the engine gear 48 and is Aircraft, Ltd. and P. J. Swaffield. Dec. 14, 1945, No. permitted to run freely by the breaking of the clutch 22,951. 52, 53 by the spring 55. 606,022. Emergency fittings. J. R. C. Quilter. An air-conditioning system, especially for aircraft, Jan. 8, 1946, No. 694. (Class 4.) (Also in Group VII.) comprises an air circulating fan which is driven by an 605,642. Aircraft control systems. R. A. Robert. An aircraft seat, which may be of the automatic air turbine or other prime mover operated by air Jan. 1, 1946. No. 112. Convention date, May 15, 1943. ejection type, is provided with one or more inertia delivered from a supercharger. A system for an air­ (Class 4.) locks 14 which control straps 10 of a safety harness. craft pressure cabin is shown, in which a turbine b is In an aircraft control system the rudder may, at In the normal position, the locks enable the harness driven by air suppled from the supercharger through the will of the pilot, be locked or be controlled by the to yield to voluntary movements of the occupant in an inlet a, the exhaust air passing to the cabin through same control means as the ailerons. The velocity ratio a discharge pipe d disposed concentrically within a between the rudder and the aileron control means larger pipe e, the annular space f between them form­ may be varied by the pilot. The movement of the ing a conduit for the passage of cabin air circulated aileron control member 1 is transmitted by chains and by a fan g directly coupled to the turbine b. The sprockets 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 to a shaft 8 on which is secured quantity of compressed air delivered to the cabin an arm 10 connected to the cables 11, 12 for control­ from the turbine is controlled by a piston valve i ling the ailerons 13. A lever 16 pivoted to a yoke 15 moving in a sleeve fitted with a number of escape on the shaft 8 about a transverse axis C—C is con­ ports It. The valve i is carried by a rod k to which is also nected by a link 17, to which it is universally jointed, attached a mushroom valve j enabling the air supply to one arm 19 of a bell-crank 20 whose other arm 21 from the turbine to be completely cut off, in which is connected to the cable 22 controlling the rudder case the air in the system is maintained in continuous 23. The connection 18 between the link 17 and the circulation by the fan g without replenishment. bell-crank 20 normally lies on the axis C—C so that Heating apparatus may be fitted between the outlet the rudder is not affected by movement of the lever 16 o of the pipe c and the cabin. about the axis C—C when the control member 1 is in its central position as shown. The lever 16 is moved about the axis C—C by the piston 29 on a fluid- pressure cylinder 30 mounted on the shaft 8 and supplied with pressure fluid through a flexible conduit 34 from a cylinder 33 operated by a pedal 311. When relation to his seat but will hold the harness tightly against sudden shocks. The locks 14 are controlled through vertical rods 15 by levers 16 at the ends of a shaft 17 at the base of the seat, the levers enabling the harness to be locked against all movement or completely freed. In the latter case, the rotation of the shaft 17 releases leg straps, attached to the seat, the ends of which are held by hinged pegs in arms on the 605,750. Turning-gear. Bendix Aviation Corpora­ shaft. An emergency actuator, adapted to release the tion. Jan. 3, 1946, No. 305. Convention date, Jan. 8, harness with a time lag after a shock operation of the inertia lock, consists of an explosive charge, within An engine starter with an armature 3 which a cylinder 25 and ignited by an inertia switch 26, which centralizes with respect to the field coils 2 when forces down a piston connected to a crank 24 on the energized, carries on one end of the armature shaft control shaft 17, thus rotating it. A small parachute 40 a pinion 47 connected to said shaft through a ten­ may be provided for slowing the descent of the scat sion spring 43 and over-running clutch 52, 53, the whilst the pilot takes to his own parachute. other end of the shaft 4, which is pressed into the March 1951 91 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 23 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1951

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032016
Publisher site
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Abstract

the pedal 311 is not depressed the universal joint between the lever 16 and the link 17 lies on the axis of the shaft 8 and the rudder is locked. When the pedal is depressed, the universal joint is displaced from the axis of the shaft 8 so that rotation of the shaft by the These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are taken, by permission, from the officially prepared control member 1 causes motion of the rudder 23, the abridgments classified in Groups. Sets of Group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, velocity ratio being determined by the extent of 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, sheet by sheet as issued, at a subscription of 10s. per Group. Copies depression of the pedal 311. of the full specifications are obtainable at the same address, price 1s. each 605,968. Engine driving-gear. A. C. Elliott and J. P. Treen. Dec. 7, 1945, No. 33189. (Class 7 (ii).) 605,112. Regulating. J. Lucas, Ltd. and R. J. (Also in Groups XXIV and XXVIII.) Ifield. Dec. 27, 1945, No. 34,919. The flow of liquid Mechanism for converting reciprocating into rotary fuel from a variable delivery pump to the nozzle in a motion or vice versa and particularly applicable to combustion chamber of a prime mover is controlled by engines, pumps and compressors, comprises a recipro­ passing the fuel through a valve and a variable orifice, cating member 9, FIGS. 1 and 2, which is connected regulating the pump delivery by the pressure drop set to oppositely rotating crank discs 1, 1 by means of a up across the orifice and varying the orifice in response transversely arranged member 6, 61 mounted for a to air blower pressure, and controlling the valve certain amount of pivotal movement on pins 7. As by manually adjustable and temperature-responsive shown, the member 9 comprises a crosshead of a means. piston 12 and works in a guide 10 and the discs 1, 1 are provided with gear teeth 17 for co-operating with suitable gearing for the transmission of power. During its reciprocation the member 9 is also given a partial rotation and this may be utilized as shown in FIG. 4 to enable ports 14 in an extension 13 of the piston head 12 to control the admission and expulsion of gases in co-operation with ports 15 in the cylinder. In a multi-cylinder radial engine all the side discs on each side of a bank of cylinders are geared to a com­ mon collection wheel and in a multi-bank arrangement such a collection wheel may also be common to two adjacent banks of cylinders. These collection wheels may be interconnected by bevel gears the shafts of which may serve for driving the engine valve gear. Specification 6719/06 (Class 7) is referred to. off-centre position by the spring 11, having a groove 14 which is engaged in the off-centre position by an extension 13 of the starter solenoid plunger 20 which when energized rises out of engagement with the said groove 14 and compresses the spring 32 through the lever 31 so pressing the member 27 into a groove 28 in the shaft 4 and holding it in the centred position. This centering movement partially engages the pinion 47 with the engine gear 48, the full meshing of the gears 47, and 48, and the closing of the clutch 52, 53 being effected by the nut 49 on the screwed sleeve 39. When the engine fires and the pinion 47 is acclerated above the speed of the starter, the pinion 605,127. Ventilation systems for aircraft. Westland partially breaks mesh with the engine gear 48 and is Aircraft, Ltd. and P. J. Swaffield. Dec. 14, 1945, No. permitted to run freely by the breaking of the clutch 22,951. 52, 53 by the spring 55. 606,022. Emergency fittings. J. R. C. Quilter. An air-conditioning system, especially for aircraft, Jan. 8, 1946, No. 694. (Class 4.) (Also in Group VII.) comprises an air circulating fan which is driven by an 605,642. Aircraft control systems. R. A. Robert. An aircraft seat, which may be of the automatic air turbine or other prime mover operated by air Jan. 1, 1946. No. 112. Convention date, May 15, 1943. ejection type, is provided with one or more inertia delivered from a supercharger. A system for an air­ (Class 4.) locks 14 which control straps 10 of a safety harness. craft pressure cabin is shown, in which a turbine b is In an aircraft control system the rudder may, at In the normal position, the locks enable the harness driven by air suppled from the supercharger through the will of the pilot, be locked or be controlled by the to yield to voluntary movements of the occupant in an inlet a, the exhaust air passing to the cabin through same control means as the ailerons. The velocity ratio a discharge pipe d disposed concentrically within a between the rudder and the aileron control means larger pipe e, the annular space f between them form­ may be varied by the pilot. The movement of the ing a conduit for the passage of cabin air circulated aileron control member 1 is transmitted by chains and by a fan g directly coupled to the turbine b. The sprockets 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 to a shaft 8 on which is secured quantity of compressed air delivered to the cabin an arm 10 connected to the cables 11, 12 for control­ from the turbine is controlled by a piston valve i ling the ailerons 13. A lever 16 pivoted to a yoke 15 moving in a sleeve fitted with a number of escape on the shaft 8 about a transverse axis C—C is con­ ports It. The valve i is carried by a rod k to which is also nected by a link 17, to which it is universally jointed, attached a mushroom valve j enabling the air supply to one arm 19 of a bell-crank 20 whose other arm 21 from the turbine to be completely cut off, in which is connected to the cable 22 controlling the rudder case the air in the system is maintained in continuous 23. The connection 18 between the link 17 and the circulation by the fan g without replenishment. bell-crank 20 normally lies on the axis C—C so that Heating apparatus may be fitted between the outlet the rudder is not affected by movement of the lever 16 o of the pipe c and the cabin. about the axis C—C when the control member 1 is in its central position as shown. The lever 16 is moved about the axis C—C by the piston 29 on a fluid- pressure cylinder 30 mounted on the shaft 8 and supplied with pressure fluid through a flexible conduit 34 from a cylinder 33 operated by a pedal 311. When relation to his seat but will hold the harness tightly against sudden shocks. The locks 14 are controlled through vertical rods 15 by levers 16 at the ends of a shaft 17 at the base of the seat, the levers enabling the harness to be locked against all movement or completely freed. In the latter case, the rotation of the shaft 17 releases leg straps, attached to the seat, the ends of which are held by hinged pegs in arms on the 605,750. Turning-gear. Bendix Aviation Corpora­ shaft. An emergency actuator, adapted to release the tion. Jan. 3, 1946, No. 305. Convention date, Jan. 8, harness with a time lag after a shock operation of the inertia lock, consists of an explosive charge, within An engine starter with an armature 3 which a cylinder 25 and ignited by an inertia switch 26, which centralizes with respect to the field coils 2 when forces down a piston connected to a crank 24 on the energized, carries on one end of the armature shaft control shaft 17, thus rotating it. A small parachute 40 a pinion 47 connected to said shaft through a ten­ may be provided for slowing the descent of the scat sion spring 43 and over-running clutch 52, 53, the whilst the pilot takes to his own parachute. other end of the shaft 4, which is pressed into the March 1951 91

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1951

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