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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 142 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 384,340 . Oil engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21, section. In a further modification, Fig. 2, arched Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. June 8, 1931, booms 4 are riveted to outwardly splayed side mem­ No. 16659. [Class 7 (iii).] bers 1 which have their abutting edge flanges 9 I n a compression-ignition engine of the type in riveted together, Fig. 5, and to a transverse tie which substantially the whole of the air charge is membe r 10 whic h may be continuous or may com­ forced into a spherical offset combustion chamber prise a number of spaced tie members. Stiffening F during the compression stroke, the fuel is dis­ post s 3 may be upwardly extended to support rib charged by an injector H in a compact stream which booms 6. In a modified form, Fig. 4, tubula r booms passes through the centre of the chamber and hav e inwardly extending flanges 11 between which impinges on an uncooled plug G, which forms the ar e nested the outer edges of the side-plates 1. lower portion of th e combustion chamber, a t a spot Th e features of the spars described above may be adjacent to a tapering passage G4 through which combined to form a triangular spar having a corru­ th e air is forced tangentially into the chamber; gate d boom forming one side of the triangle and an th e circumferential portions of the rotating air apical boom of tubular or arched form. charge are thus brought progressively into contact with the fuel spray as it impinges on the plug so tha t the air and fuel are thoroughly mixed immedi­ restriction B4, Fig. 2, which connects the two ately before the charge reaches th e inner end of the cylindrical end portions B2, B3 of the combustion passage G4, and the tendency for unconsumed air chamber . The cylinder head may have a flat t o be driven out of the chamber is reduced. No inner face, or it may be of the pent-house form fuel is injected directly into th e end of th e passage. shown in Fig. 3, in which four valves are provided, The passage ma y be of circula r cross section through­ th e two exhaust valves A'1 being located within out, or it may change t o a crescent or kidney shape th e cylindrical end portions of the combustion toward s its inner end, the area of the latter end chamber ; the piston head is shaped to conform being preferably three-fifths that at the outer. closely to the shape of the cylinder head. Fig. 6 Instead of th e passage traversing the plug, it may shows an alternative arrangement of the valves be formed by a groove cut in the outer cylindrical i n a head having a flat inner face; one inlet surface of the plug, th e direction of rotation of the valv e T opens directly into the cylinder, whilst charge thus being opposite to that obtaining in a n exhaust valve is located within the end R2 of the combustion chamber remote from the 385,074 . Screw propellers. Fairey Avia­ injector. The walls of the portion R2 of the com­ tion Co., Ltd., Cranford Lane, Hayes, Middlesex, bustion chamber may be tapered inwards towards an d Lobelle, M. J. O., Scalesclugh, Langley Road, th e cylinder, whilst a liner of heat-insulating Slough, Buckinghamshire. Nov. 11, 1931, No. meta l is provided in the portion R1. In each 31246. [Class 114.] arrangement , the two end portions may be fitted I n varying the pitch of screw-propeller blades wit h heat-insulating liners and the restricted below a predetermined speed the blade is secured portio n may be formed by fitting shaped blocks t o the hub by a tension member which is weak t o th e walls of a parallel-sided chamber. torsionally, the outer end of th e weak member being secured to a differential screw sleeve in the blade root . The blade 10 has a recess into which is 384,721 . Induction pipes. Armstrong Sidde- screwed a sleeve 24 that has an inner screw of ley Motors, Ltd., Viale, S. M., and Thomas, A., different pitch, the inner end of th e sleeve 24 has a Armstron g Siddeley Works, Park Side, Coventry. Fig. 1. The plug G is made of a heat-resisting numbe r of teeth adapted to be engaged by end Sept. 11, 1931, No. 25508. metal of low hea t conductivity ; it is fitted loosely in teet h on a sleeve 27 secured by a flange to the base [Class 7 (ii).] the mouth of a water-cooled pocket so that it is of the propeller root. A cylindrical member 22 A charge-mixing device com­ surrounded by a heat insulating air-space F1. A is slotted so as to be weak torsionally and at its prises an annular chamber 9 retaining ring G2 may be optionally provided, the inner end is secured by a pin to the socket 23 on the of decreasing cross section, off-set of the plug ensuring sufficient overlap propeller boss. At its outer end it is screwed into int o which the charge is led between the cylinder end and plug to retain the th e block 24 and carries radial teeth engaged by tangentiall y from the car­ latte r if th e ring is omitted. In the modified con­ corresponding teeth on a sleeve 25 also secured at burettor , and a flaring portion struction shown in Fig. 3, th e upper portion of the 26 t o th e blade root. The outer stiffening member 8 through which the charge combustion chamber is provided with a liner K 12 of the blade root is held on to the blade proper passes wit h a corkscrew motion which is insulated from th e water-cooled pocket by b y a coned nu t 12a and carries a flange 15 which is t o an annular distribution a n air gap ; the liner is supported by an integral adapte d when the propeller blade moves out­ chambe r 12. The portion 8 boss K1 which passes through a bore in the wall of wardl y under centrifugal force to abut against an ma y house a supercharging th e pocket and is secured by a ring K2. An elec­ interna l distance nu t 16 on the hu b socket 14. The fan 13 a s shown. trically heated hot wire J is employed at starting. blad e root carries a The injector socket passes through the water block which is con­ jacket chamber of the cylinder head to ensure 384,838 , Aircraft framework. A.T.S. Co., necte d by link s passing adequate cooling. Specification 371,025 is referred Ltd. , Wylie, H. N., and Sanders, S., 5 Clement's throug h an opening to . Inn , Strand, London. Feb. 8, 1932, No. 3624. 19 in th e hu b socket to [Class 4.] th e pitch controlling 384,674 . Oil Engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21, gear. At low propeller Taperin g tubular metal spars comprise booms Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. June 11, 1931, speeds th e flange 15 is whic h are either corrugated or of generally arched 'No. 16981. [Classes 7 (ii) and 7 (iii).] clear of its abutment or tubular cross section; when corrugated booms 16 and the blade can Fuel is sprayed in the form of a hollow cone ar e employed these are of considerable width and the n be given a pitch from one end of an elongated combustion chamber ar e interconnected by side members free from adjustmen t by over­ having a narrowed section a t or about the centre lightening holes each comprising a single flat coming the torsion of of its length, the whole of the inner side of the surface strengthened by stiff metal transverse th e sleeve 22. At chamber being open to the cylinder. The axis of members, and when booms of generally arched or highe r speeds the th e fuel jet E is substantially at right-angles to tubula r cross section are employed these side mem­ flange 15 bears on its th e cylinder axis and is directed towards the bers are bent outwardly t o form two or more flat abutemen t 16 and portion s interconnected by flanges and also stiffened bring s into pla y a fric- b y transverse members. Fig. 1 shows a rectangular tiona l resistance t o any spar comprising corrugated booms 4 and flat thin effort to alter the shee t side members I riveted at flanged edges 2 to pitch . The bolts 26 similar flanges 5 on th e booms 4. The sheets 1 are used for securing the reinforced by members 3 placed at intervals be­ sleeves 25 and 27 are twee n upper and lower flanges 28. The spar may unequall y spaced so as b e placed at the deepest part of the aerofoil and t o provide a varying according to modification be of generally trape­ adjustment . zoidal form to fit in a tapering part of the aerofoil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 5 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1933

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029692
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Abstract

142 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1933 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 384,340 . Oil engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21, section. In a further modification, Fig. 2, arched Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. June 8, 1931, booms 4 are riveted to outwardly splayed side mem­ No. 16659. [Class 7 (iii).] bers 1 which have their abutting edge flanges 9 I n a compression-ignition engine of the type in riveted together, Fig. 5, and to a transverse tie which substantially the whole of the air charge is membe r 10 whic h may be continuous or may com­ forced into a spherical offset combustion chamber prise a number of spaced tie members. Stiffening F during the compression stroke, the fuel is dis­ post s 3 may be upwardly extended to support rib charged by an injector H in a compact stream which booms 6. In a modified form, Fig. 4, tubula r booms passes through the centre of the chamber and hav e inwardly extending flanges 11 between which impinges on an uncooled plug G, which forms the ar e nested the outer edges of the side-plates 1. lower portion of th e combustion chamber, a t a spot Th e features of the spars described above may be adjacent to a tapering passage G4 through which combined to form a triangular spar having a corru­ th e air is forced tangentially into the chamber; gate d boom forming one side of the triangle and an th e circumferential portions of the rotating air apical boom of tubular or arched form. charge are thus brought progressively into contact with the fuel spray as it impinges on the plug so tha t the air and fuel are thoroughly mixed immedi­ restriction B4, Fig. 2, which connects the two ately before the charge reaches th e inner end of the cylindrical end portions B2, B3 of the combustion passage G4, and the tendency for unconsumed air chamber . The cylinder head may have a flat t o be driven out of the chamber is reduced. No inner face, or it may be of the pent-house form fuel is injected directly into th e end of th e passage. shown in Fig. 3, in which four valves are provided, The passage ma y be of circula r cross section through­ th e two exhaust valves A'1 being located within out, or it may change t o a crescent or kidney shape th e cylindrical end portions of the combustion toward s its inner end, the area of the latter end chamber ; the piston head is shaped to conform being preferably three-fifths that at the outer. closely to the shape of the cylinder head. Fig. 6 Instead of th e passage traversing the plug, it may shows an alternative arrangement of the valves be formed by a groove cut in the outer cylindrical i n a head having a flat inner face; one inlet surface of the plug, th e direction of rotation of the valv e T opens directly into the cylinder, whilst charge thus being opposite to that obtaining in a n exhaust valve is located within the end R2 of the combustion chamber remote from the 385,074 . Screw propellers. Fairey Avia­ injector. The walls of the portion R2 of the com­ tion Co., Ltd., Cranford Lane, Hayes, Middlesex, bustion chamber may be tapered inwards towards an d Lobelle, M. J. O., Scalesclugh, Langley Road, th e cylinder, whilst a liner of heat-insulating Slough, Buckinghamshire. Nov. 11, 1931, No. meta l is provided in the portion R1. In each 31246. [Class 114.] arrangement , the two end portions may be fitted I n varying the pitch of screw-propeller blades wit h heat-insulating liners and the restricted below a predetermined speed the blade is secured portio n may be formed by fitting shaped blocks t o the hub by a tension member which is weak t o th e walls of a parallel-sided chamber. torsionally, the outer end of th e weak member being secured to a differential screw sleeve in the blade root . The blade 10 has a recess into which is 384,721 . Induction pipes. Armstrong Sidde- screwed a sleeve 24 that has an inner screw of ley Motors, Ltd., Viale, S. M., and Thomas, A., different pitch, the inner end of th e sleeve 24 has a Armstron g Siddeley Works, Park Side, Coventry. Fig. 1. The plug G is made of a heat-resisting numbe r of teeth adapted to be engaged by end Sept. 11, 1931, No. 25508. metal of low hea t conductivity ; it is fitted loosely in teet h on a sleeve 27 secured by a flange to the base [Class 7 (ii).] the mouth of a water-cooled pocket so that it is of the propeller root. A cylindrical member 22 A charge-mixing device com­ surrounded by a heat insulating air-space F1. A is slotted so as to be weak torsionally and at its prises an annular chamber 9 retaining ring G2 may be optionally provided, the inner end is secured by a pin to the socket 23 on the of decreasing cross section, off-set of the plug ensuring sufficient overlap propeller boss. At its outer end it is screwed into int o which the charge is led between the cylinder end and plug to retain the th e block 24 and carries radial teeth engaged by tangentiall y from the car­ latte r if th e ring is omitted. In the modified con­ corresponding teeth on a sleeve 25 also secured at burettor , and a flaring portion struction shown in Fig. 3, th e upper portion of the 26 t o th e blade root. The outer stiffening member 8 through which the charge combustion chamber is provided with a liner K 12 of the blade root is held on to the blade proper passes wit h a corkscrew motion which is insulated from th e water-cooled pocket by b y a coned nu t 12a and carries a flange 15 which is t o an annular distribution a n air gap ; the liner is supported by an integral adapte d when the propeller blade moves out­ chambe r 12. The portion 8 boss K1 which passes through a bore in the wall of wardl y under centrifugal force to abut against an ma y house a supercharging th e pocket and is secured by a ring K2. An elec­ interna l distance nu t 16 on the hu b socket 14. The fan 13 a s shown. trically heated hot wire J is employed at starting. blad e root carries a The injector socket passes through the water block which is con­ jacket chamber of the cylinder head to ensure 384,838 , Aircraft framework. A.T.S. Co., necte d by link s passing adequate cooling. Specification 371,025 is referred Ltd. , Wylie, H. N., and Sanders, S., 5 Clement's throug h an opening to . Inn , Strand, London. Feb. 8, 1932, No. 3624. 19 in th e hu b socket to [Class 4.] th e pitch controlling 384,674 . Oil Engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21, gear. At low propeller Taperin g tubular metal spars comprise booms Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. June 11, 1931, speeds th e flange 15 is whic h are either corrugated or of generally arched 'No. 16981. [Classes 7 (ii) and 7 (iii).] clear of its abutment or tubular cross section; when corrugated booms 16 and the blade can Fuel is sprayed in the form of a hollow cone ar e employed these are of considerable width and the n be given a pitch from one end of an elongated combustion chamber ar e interconnected by side members free from adjustmen t by over­ having a narrowed section a t or about the centre lightening holes each comprising a single flat coming the torsion of of its length, the whole of the inner side of the surface strengthened by stiff metal transverse th e sleeve 22. At chamber being open to the cylinder. The axis of members, and when booms of generally arched or highe r speeds the th e fuel jet E is substantially at right-angles to tubula r cross section are employed these side mem­ flange 15 bears on its th e cylinder axis and is directed towards the bers are bent outwardly t o form two or more flat abutemen t 16 and portion s interconnected by flanges and also stiffened bring s into pla y a fric- b y transverse members. Fig. 1 shows a rectangular tiona l resistance t o any spar comprising corrugated booms 4 and flat thin effort to alter the shee t side members I riveted at flanged edges 2 to pitch . The bolts 26 similar flanges 5 on th e booms 4. The sheets 1 are used for securing the reinforced by members 3 placed at intervals be­ sleeves 25 and 27 are twee n upper and lower flanges 28. The spar may unequall y spaced so as b e placed at the deepest part of the aerofoil and t o provide a varying according to modification be of generally trape­ adjustment . zoidal form to fit in a tapering part of the aerofoil

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1933

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