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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office June, 1931 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 153 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 342,268 . Aircraft wing structures. Wallis, wit h an arm secured to spindle 18 tha t the valve B. N., Weybridge Works, Byfleet Road, Weybridge, is shut when the tail of the machine is up and Surrey. Oct. 26, 1929, No. 32574. [Class 4.] opened as the tail falls. Aircraft wings having a framework comprising longitudinal spars an d transverse ribs have stringers 343,097 . Cooling cylinders ; relief valves. connected to the ribs in the direction of the span Darby , M. O., Regent House, Kingsway, London, so tha t their outer surface projects outside the ribs, the outer surfaces of the stringers being so located an d Sidney, A. A., 22, Lodge Road , Croydon, Surrey. that a fair curve surrounding them in the direction Nov . 14, 1929, No . 1783. [Classes 7 (ii) and 7 (iii).] of the chord gives the required wing section, and a I n engines of the kind in which fuel is directly flexible oute r covering which when attached docs injected into a pre-combustion chamber located in not contact with the ribs but assumes the required th e cylinder head, the pre-combustion chamber is contour. formed with a portion which projects into the A wing, Fig. 1, comprises a built-up spar 1 combustion chamber while the remaining portion of the type described in Specification 334,405, projects out of the cylinder and is cooled by the [Class 4, Aeronautics], transverse ribs 4 supported surroundin g air. As shown in Fig. 2, the lower at the junctions of the spar bays, stringers 8, and portion A1 of the pre-combustion chamber A pro­ an outer covering 14. The stringers 8 arc arranged ject s into the conical part B 5 of the cylinder head to conform with the wing shape, for instance as B 1 , and the upper portion, which is provided with shown in Fig. 1, and the spacing between them is cooling fins A6, projects into the atmosphere. The adjusted to suit th e aerodynami c loading a t different pre-combustion chamber A engages a seat B 2 formed points in the chord. a t the top of the part B5 and is provided with a preven t operation of the brakes when the tail of flange A4 secured by bolts D to a flange B4 on the When fabric covering is used light flexible battens th e aircraft is lifted to a point a t which braking is cylinder head. To avoid damage from pre-ignition, may be arranged transversely or diagonally with dangerous, this control of th e braking being effected th e pre-combustion chamber may be resiliently respect to the stringers. Each rib 4, Fig. 2, b y th e rocking of th e wheel frame abou t its support mounte d by providing springs Dl between the A wheel-carrying frame comprising sheet-metal flange A4 and the nuts on the bolt D. In a modifi­ member s 13, 14, Fig. 3, which are shaped to form cation, the plate F carrying the fuel nozzle E seats a fairing for wheels 10, 11, Fig. 1, is connected by on th e top of th e pre-combustion chamber, the plate shock absorbing means to a strut or bracket 17 an d the pre-combustion chamber being both resili- fixed to the aircraft. The shock absorber com­ entl y secured in position by a bar bearing on the prises compression rubbers 34 arranged around to p of the fuel nozzle and engaging bolts projecting an d co-operating with an oil dashpot and is located from the cylinder head, springs being inserted within the planes in which lie th e ends of th e wheel between the bar and the nuts of the bolts. hubs . The outer cylinder 20 of the dashpot is keyed to a spindle 18 passing through a fork in membe r 17 and has a stud 24 on its lower end on which is mounted a bush 26 slidably engaging in a slot 22 formed in a downwardly extending arm 21 integral with member 17. The inner cylinder 28 is fixed to a base fitting 27 bolted between the frame member s 13, 14. Rebound rubbers 37 placed between a head 36 slidably mounted on the outer cylinder 20 and a flange 33 fixed to this cylinder tak e the weight of the undercarriage in flight. Th e spindle 18 is free to rotate in the fork of membe r 17 and thus allows the wheel frame to rock in a vertical plane between limits set by engagemen t of the stud 24 with the ends of the slot 22. In the form shown, in which fluid pressure 342,304 . Oil engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21 brake s are employed, th e conduit from th e pressure Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. Oct. 30, 1929, control means is placed in series with the bore of comprises wire braced leading and trailing edge No . 32963. Addition to 261,435. [Class 7 (iii). a cylinder 44 fixed to the spindle 18, and containing sections and upper and lower centre sections, each Internal-combustio n engines, Carburetting-appara- a piston 46 operated by a roller 50 engaging a fixed section being secured by plates 9 to the flanges of tus , &c., for]. [Class 7 (iii).] abutmen t 51 formed on the arm 21 of the member spar strengthening sleeves 2. The ribs comprise 17. When the tail of the aeroplane is off the angle members 4a, 4b, Fig. 2, connected by pressed A fuel-spraying device is disposed in the ground on landing the piston is at or near the bracing pieces 4c. The stringers are of similar con­ circumferential wall of a combustion chamber, botto m of its stroke and the brakes are inoperative; struction having flanges 8a, 8b and arc secured to an d its fuel emission orifices are disposed to rocking of the undercarriage as the tail falls causes the ribs b y angle-strips 10 riveted to the members produc e jets in substantially opposite directions in th e piston 46 to move upwardly reducing the 4a, 4b. The ribs need not bo shaped to the profile, a vertical plane. The mean direction of the jets capacit y of the cylinder an d thu s allowing or causing this being determined by the arrangement of the ma y be parallel to or inclined to the cylinder axis application of the brakes. In an application to stringers. The tubular spars may be formed from a t an angle of between 30 deg. and 45 deg. A wire-operated brakes, the wires may be looped over helically wound strip metal. series of jets may comprise two or more sprayers pulleys secured to the spindle 18 an d quadrant 21 spaced apar t circumfcrentially. Different angles of respectively in such a manner that the wires are 344,441. Aircraft wheel-brake and shock- inclination towards the cylinder axis may be used only tautened when the tail of the machine falls. absorbing gear . India-Rubber, Gutta Percha & for the upper and lower jets. Separate sprayers Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 106, Cannon Street, Similarly in an application to a pneumatic braking ma y be employed for producing the upward jet or and Avery, W. L., of India-Rubber, Gutta Percha syste m a valve through which th e air passes to the series of jets, these being disposed either in the & Telegraph Works, Silvertown, both in London. brake s is provided in the quadran t 21 and so linked same vertical plane or displaced circumferentially Nov. 27, 1929, No . 36318. [Class 4.] from those producing the downward jets ; in the latte r arrangement the sprayers may be located in In an undercarriage of the type in which a rigid th e same transverse plane. When using two or frame carries wheels mounted one behind the other more separate spraying devices these may be to rotate in the same vertical plane, the frame located at the ends of the combustion chamber, being pivoted between the wheels directly or th e jets being oppositely directed. In any of the indirectly to the aircraft, and in which one or more above arrangements the direction of the jets may of the wheels have brakes, means are provided to b e inclined to a vertical plane containing the axis of the combustion chamber thus providing a * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently tangentia l component which may be in the same published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery direction as, or opposite to, th e direction of rotation Office, from abridgements which are issued by the Office. Printed of the charge in the combustion chamber. The copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2. price one uppe r and lower series of jets may have tangential shilling each. component s acting in different directions. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied (This Specification is accompanied by a drawing) by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 3 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1931

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029415
Publisher site
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Abstract

June, 1931 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 153 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently 342,268 . Aircraft wing structures. Wallis, wit h an arm secured to spindle 18 tha t the valve B. N., Weybridge Works, Byfleet Road, Weybridge, is shut when the tail of the machine is up and Surrey. Oct. 26, 1929, No. 32574. [Class 4.] opened as the tail falls. Aircraft wings having a framework comprising longitudinal spars an d transverse ribs have stringers 343,097 . Cooling cylinders ; relief valves. connected to the ribs in the direction of the span Darby , M. O., Regent House, Kingsway, London, so tha t their outer surface projects outside the ribs, the outer surfaces of the stringers being so located an d Sidney, A. A., 22, Lodge Road , Croydon, Surrey. that a fair curve surrounding them in the direction Nov . 14, 1929, No . 1783. [Classes 7 (ii) and 7 (iii).] of the chord gives the required wing section, and a I n engines of the kind in which fuel is directly flexible oute r covering which when attached docs injected into a pre-combustion chamber located in not contact with the ribs but assumes the required th e cylinder head, the pre-combustion chamber is contour. formed with a portion which projects into the A wing, Fig. 1, comprises a built-up spar 1 combustion chamber while the remaining portion of the type described in Specification 334,405, projects out of the cylinder and is cooled by the [Class 4, Aeronautics], transverse ribs 4 supported surroundin g air. As shown in Fig. 2, the lower at the junctions of the spar bays, stringers 8, and portion A1 of the pre-combustion chamber A pro­ an outer covering 14. The stringers 8 arc arranged ject s into the conical part B 5 of the cylinder head to conform with the wing shape, for instance as B 1 , and the upper portion, which is provided with shown in Fig. 1, and the spacing between them is cooling fins A6, projects into the atmosphere. The adjusted to suit th e aerodynami c loading a t different pre-combustion chamber A engages a seat B 2 formed points in the chord. a t the top of the part B5 and is provided with a preven t operation of the brakes when the tail of flange A4 secured by bolts D to a flange B4 on the When fabric covering is used light flexible battens th e aircraft is lifted to a point a t which braking is cylinder head. To avoid damage from pre-ignition, may be arranged transversely or diagonally with dangerous, this control of th e braking being effected th e pre-combustion chamber may be resiliently respect to the stringers. Each rib 4, Fig. 2, b y th e rocking of th e wheel frame abou t its support mounte d by providing springs Dl between the A wheel-carrying frame comprising sheet-metal flange A4 and the nuts on the bolt D. In a modifi­ member s 13, 14, Fig. 3, which are shaped to form cation, the plate F carrying the fuel nozzle E seats a fairing for wheels 10, 11, Fig. 1, is connected by on th e top of th e pre-combustion chamber, the plate shock absorbing means to a strut or bracket 17 an d the pre-combustion chamber being both resili- fixed to the aircraft. The shock absorber com­ entl y secured in position by a bar bearing on the prises compression rubbers 34 arranged around to p of the fuel nozzle and engaging bolts projecting an d co-operating with an oil dashpot and is located from the cylinder head, springs being inserted within the planes in which lie th e ends of th e wheel between the bar and the nuts of the bolts. hubs . The outer cylinder 20 of the dashpot is keyed to a spindle 18 passing through a fork in membe r 17 and has a stud 24 on its lower end on which is mounted a bush 26 slidably engaging in a slot 22 formed in a downwardly extending arm 21 integral with member 17. The inner cylinder 28 is fixed to a base fitting 27 bolted between the frame member s 13, 14. Rebound rubbers 37 placed between a head 36 slidably mounted on the outer cylinder 20 and a flange 33 fixed to this cylinder tak e the weight of the undercarriage in flight. Th e spindle 18 is free to rotate in the fork of membe r 17 and thus allows the wheel frame to rock in a vertical plane between limits set by engagemen t of the stud 24 with the ends of the slot 22. In the form shown, in which fluid pressure 342,304 . Oil engines. Ricardo, H. R., 21 brake s are employed, th e conduit from th e pressure Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, London. Oct. 30, 1929, control means is placed in series with the bore of comprises wire braced leading and trailing edge No . 32963. Addition to 261,435. [Class 7 (iii). a cylinder 44 fixed to the spindle 18, and containing sections and upper and lower centre sections, each Internal-combustio n engines, Carburetting-appara- a piston 46 operated by a roller 50 engaging a fixed section being secured by plates 9 to the flanges of tus , &c., for]. [Class 7 (iii).] abutmen t 51 formed on the arm 21 of the member spar strengthening sleeves 2. The ribs comprise 17. When the tail of the aeroplane is off the angle members 4a, 4b, Fig. 2, connected by pressed A fuel-spraying device is disposed in the ground on landing the piston is at or near the bracing pieces 4c. The stringers are of similar con­ circumferential wall of a combustion chamber, botto m of its stroke and the brakes are inoperative; struction having flanges 8a, 8b and arc secured to an d its fuel emission orifices are disposed to rocking of the undercarriage as the tail falls causes the ribs b y angle-strips 10 riveted to the members produc e jets in substantially opposite directions in th e piston 46 to move upwardly reducing the 4a, 4b. The ribs need not bo shaped to the profile, a vertical plane. The mean direction of the jets capacit y of the cylinder an d thu s allowing or causing this being determined by the arrangement of the ma y be parallel to or inclined to the cylinder axis application of the brakes. In an application to stringers. The tubular spars may be formed from a t an angle of between 30 deg. and 45 deg. A wire-operated brakes, the wires may be looped over helically wound strip metal. series of jets may comprise two or more sprayers pulleys secured to the spindle 18 an d quadrant 21 spaced apar t circumfcrentially. Different angles of respectively in such a manner that the wires are 344,441. Aircraft wheel-brake and shock- inclination towards the cylinder axis may be used only tautened when the tail of the machine falls. absorbing gear . India-Rubber, Gutta Percha & for the upper and lower jets. Separate sprayers Telegraph Works Co., Ltd., 106, Cannon Street, Similarly in an application to a pneumatic braking ma y be employed for producing the upward jet or and Avery, W. L., of India-Rubber, Gutta Percha syste m a valve through which th e air passes to the series of jets, these being disposed either in the & Telegraph Works, Silvertown, both in London. brake s is provided in the quadran t 21 and so linked same vertical plane or displaced circumferentially Nov. 27, 1929, No . 36318. [Class 4.] from those producing the downward jets ; in the latte r arrangement the sprayers may be located in In an undercarriage of the type in which a rigid th e same transverse plane. When using two or frame carries wheels mounted one behind the other more separate spraying devices these may be to rotate in the same vertical plane, the frame located at the ends of the combustion chamber, being pivoted between the wheels directly or th e jets being oppositely directed. In any of the indirectly to the aircraft, and in which one or more above arrangements the direction of the jets may of the wheels have brakes, means are provided to b e inclined to a vertical plane containing the axis of the combustion chamber thus providing a * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently tangentia l component which may be in the same published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery direction as, or opposite to, th e direction of rotation Office, from abridgements which are issued by the Office. Printed of the charge in the combustion chamber. The copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.C.2. price one uppe r and lower series of jets may have tangential shilling each. component s acting in different directions. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied (This Specification is accompanied by a drawing) by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1931

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