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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 136 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING May, 1932 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently comprise more than one channel overlapped and intercepto r 11 agains t th e resistance of a spring 16 11 . 359,146 . Aircraft spars . Budd Manufac­ riveted at the ends or butted together and riveted A spring 18 permits unimpeded movement of the turin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, Philadelphia , U.S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, t o a tapering channel fishplate. aileron beyond that necessary fully to raise the E . J. W.; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Penn­ interceptor , and a spring 16 maintains cable 15 in sylvania, U.S.A.) Sept. 12, 1930, No. 27301. tension at all times in the neighbourhood of the lever-and-link mechanism of the slat. Fig. 5 shows Convention date, Sept. 13, 1929. [Class 4.] a n application to a wing having a slat mounted on A truss particularly for use as an aeroplane spar a channel 21 movable in an arcuate path , th e lever comprises built-up booms with continuous Warren 13 being mounted on an arm 26 pivoted on the girder trussing between them, each boom com­ channe l 21 and moving forwardly with it as the prising an inner substantially flat element and an intercepto r is uncovered. A roller 28 on arm 26 oute r corrugated element secured to the inner engages with a ram p 29 a t the end of its travel and element a t th e bottoms of its corrugations so as to thereb y rocks th e arm 26 and lever 13 upwardl y to form a number of closed sections. The figure brin g roller 14 int o operative position. In a further shows a spar built up from continuous strip steel modification, Fig. 9, lever 13 is mounted on an stock, of high tensile stainless steel, in which all extension 30 of a lever 31 pivoted co-axially with th e parts are joined by spot welding. The booms th e link 4 and rotated on forward movement of comprise a flat strip 12 with turned-over edges 13 th e slat by means of a pin 33 on link 5 which engages an d a superimposed corrugated strip 14 which in a slot formed at its upper end. This lever overlaps th e flanges 13 and of which th e bottoms arrangemen t may be used with either of the con­ of the corrugations contact with the strip 12 as 360,976 . Controlling aeroplanes . Page, F . H., struction s previously described. In a further a t 15. The web is formed of continuous channel an d Page, Ltd., II., 40, Claremont Road, Crickle- modification the lever 13 is fixed to the wing and section strips 16 bent to Warren girder form, each wood, London. Aug. 15, 1930, No. 24479. [Class forward movement of the slat is utilized to take up stri p being opened out to plane section at its 4 ] slack in cable 15, a link carrying a pulley round apices for welding to strip 12 and provided at these which the cable is carried being interconnected point s with a strengthening groove. One member Wings having ailerons pivoted to their trailing wit h a moving part edges are provided with interceptors adapted, when of the slat mount­ brough t into operation, to disturb the air flow over ing. Fig. 12 shows th e upper surface of the wing, which interceptors a n application of ar e operable by the ailerons only when the wing th e invention to an approache s the stalling angle, or is stalled. In unslotte d wing, in one form, Figs. 1, 3 and 4, an automatic slat 2, which an incidence carried by links 4, 5 on the wing 1, is arranged to device consisting of uncover an interceptor 11 when it moves forwardly a small pivoted a t high angles of incidence. The interceptor 11 is aerofoil 40 static­ pivotally mounted at 12 an d is operated by a lever ally balanced by 13 pivoted at 141 on link 5, having a roller 14 on a counterweight 42 is moved upwardly at large its upper end and connected at its lower end with angles of incidence and serves to rotate a lever 45 one end of a cable 15 connected to aileron 3. The havin g a pin 48 engaging in a slot 49 of a rocking roller 14 is normally out of contact with the inter­ lever carrying lever 44. Slot 49 is so shaped that ceptor, and cable 15 is normally slack to allow of th e pin 48 locks th e lever 44 a t th e end of its forward operation of the aileron, but is rendered taut by trave l until freed again by downward movement forward movement of the slat and the links 4, 5, of the aerofoil 40. According to a modification a 16 is provided for each corrugation 11 and they Fig. 3, which also brings roller 14 int o contact with small .slat having no considerable slot action may are assembled in staggered relation, as shown. th e interceptor, thereafter upward movement of be employed. Th e method of assembly is first to secure th e parts th e aileron causes rotation of lever 13 to raise the 12 and 16 in position and pass them through a continuous welding machine, spot welding the apices of the web girders to parts 12; parts 14 are the n put in position and the bottoms 15 of the corrugations 11 contracted on to the surface of par t 12 and the edges 14 overlapped on to the flanges 13, the bottoms of the corrugations being welded to th e outer faces of members 12 and the edges 14 to the flanges 13. The number of sets of web bracings and of corrugations in the booms ma y be varied simultaneously along the length of th e spar, as well as their shapes. Boom members of one width may be connected to those of another b y overlapping and spot welding them in place [This patent illustrates the method of construction of the Budd all-steel version of the Savoia-Marchctli 5.31 , described in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. IV, February, 1932, p. 38.—EDITOR.] 361,010 . Aircraft framework . Potters, Ltd., an d Bruce, R. A., Westlan d Works, Yeovil, Somerset. Aug. 26, 1930, No. 25473. [Class 4.] Taperin g metal spar or girder members of sections such as shown in Fig. 1 are formed by folding taperin g metal blanks cut from flat sheet or strip in the manner shown in Fig. 2, which ensures the minimum waste of material. The girders may * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price 1s. each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ panied, by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 4 (5): 1 – May 1, 1932

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029552
Publisher site
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Abstract

136 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING May, 1932 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engine Specifications Published Recently comprise more than one channel overlapped and intercepto r 11 agains t th e resistance of a spring 16 11 . 359,146 . Aircraft spars . Budd Manufac­ riveted at the ends or butted together and riveted A spring 18 permits unimpeded movement of the turin g Co., E. G., 2500, Hunting Park Avenue, Philadelphia , U.S.A.—(Assignees of Ragsdale, t o a tapering channel fishplate. aileron beyond that necessary fully to raise the E . J. W.; Curren Terrace, Norristown, Penn­ interceptor , and a spring 16 maintains cable 15 in sylvania, U.S.A.) Sept. 12, 1930, No. 27301. tension at all times in the neighbourhood of the lever-and-link mechanism of the slat. Fig. 5 shows Convention date, Sept. 13, 1929. [Class 4.] a n application to a wing having a slat mounted on A truss particularly for use as an aeroplane spar a channel 21 movable in an arcuate path , th e lever comprises built-up booms with continuous Warren 13 being mounted on an arm 26 pivoted on the girder trussing between them, each boom com­ channe l 21 and moving forwardly with it as the prising an inner substantially flat element and an intercepto r is uncovered. A roller 28 on arm 26 oute r corrugated element secured to the inner engages with a ram p 29 a t the end of its travel and element a t th e bottoms of its corrugations so as to thereb y rocks th e arm 26 and lever 13 upwardl y to form a number of closed sections. The figure brin g roller 14 int o operative position. In a further shows a spar built up from continuous strip steel modification, Fig. 9, lever 13 is mounted on an stock, of high tensile stainless steel, in which all extension 30 of a lever 31 pivoted co-axially with th e parts are joined by spot welding. The booms th e link 4 and rotated on forward movement of comprise a flat strip 12 with turned-over edges 13 th e slat by means of a pin 33 on link 5 which engages an d a superimposed corrugated strip 14 which in a slot formed at its upper end. This lever overlaps th e flanges 13 and of which th e bottoms arrangemen t may be used with either of the con­ of the corrugations contact with the strip 12 as 360,976 . Controlling aeroplanes . Page, F . H., struction s previously described. In a further a t 15. The web is formed of continuous channel an d Page, Ltd., II., 40, Claremont Road, Crickle- modification the lever 13 is fixed to the wing and section strips 16 bent to Warren girder form, each wood, London. Aug. 15, 1930, No. 24479. [Class forward movement of the slat is utilized to take up stri p being opened out to plane section at its 4 ] slack in cable 15, a link carrying a pulley round apices for welding to strip 12 and provided at these which the cable is carried being interconnected point s with a strengthening groove. One member Wings having ailerons pivoted to their trailing wit h a moving part edges are provided with interceptors adapted, when of the slat mount­ brough t into operation, to disturb the air flow over ing. Fig. 12 shows th e upper surface of the wing, which interceptors a n application of ar e operable by the ailerons only when the wing th e invention to an approache s the stalling angle, or is stalled. In unslotte d wing, in one form, Figs. 1, 3 and 4, an automatic slat 2, which an incidence carried by links 4, 5 on the wing 1, is arranged to device consisting of uncover an interceptor 11 when it moves forwardly a small pivoted a t high angles of incidence. The interceptor 11 is aerofoil 40 static­ pivotally mounted at 12 an d is operated by a lever ally balanced by 13 pivoted at 141 on link 5, having a roller 14 on a counterweight 42 is moved upwardly at large its upper end and connected at its lower end with angles of incidence and serves to rotate a lever 45 one end of a cable 15 connected to aileron 3. The havin g a pin 48 engaging in a slot 49 of a rocking roller 14 is normally out of contact with the inter­ lever carrying lever 44. Slot 49 is so shaped that ceptor, and cable 15 is normally slack to allow of th e pin 48 locks th e lever 44 a t th e end of its forward operation of the aileron, but is rendered taut by trave l until freed again by downward movement forward movement of the slat and the links 4, 5, of the aerofoil 40. According to a modification a 16 is provided for each corrugation 11 and they Fig. 3, which also brings roller 14 int o contact with small .slat having no considerable slot action may are assembled in staggered relation, as shown. th e interceptor, thereafter upward movement of be employed. Th e method of assembly is first to secure th e parts th e aileron causes rotation of lever 13 to raise the 12 and 16 in position and pass them through a continuous welding machine, spot welding the apices of the web girders to parts 12; parts 14 are the n put in position and the bottoms 15 of the corrugations 11 contracted on to the surface of par t 12 and the edges 14 overlapped on to the flanges 13, the bottoms of the corrugations being welded to th e outer faces of members 12 and the edges 14 to the flanges 13. The number of sets of web bracings and of corrugations in the booms ma y be varied simultaneously along the length of th e spar, as well as their shapes. Boom members of one width may be connected to those of another b y overlapping and spot welding them in place [This patent illustrates the method of construction of the Budd all-steel version of the Savoia-Marchctli 5.31 , described in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. IV, February, 1932, p. 38.—EDITOR.] 361,010 . Aircraft framework . Potters, Ltd., an d Bruce, R. A., Westlan d Works, Yeovil, Somerset. Aug. 26, 1930, No. 25473. [Class 4.] Taperin g metal spar or girder members of sections such as shown in Fig. 1 are formed by folding taperin g metal blanks cut from flat sheet or strip in the manner shown in Fig. 2, which ensures the minimum waste of material. The girders may * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently published are specially compiled, by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from abridgments which are issued by the Office classified into groups. Sets of group abridgments can be obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton buildings, London, W.C.2, either sheet by sheet as issued on payment of a subscription of 5s. per group volume, or in bound volumes at 2s. each. Copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the same address, price 1s. each. Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccom­ panied, by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1932

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