Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. 695,025. Variable-sweep wings. Blackburn and General Aircraft Ltd. Application, June 23, 1950. Jn an aircraft in which the wings 10 can be moved from a spread position, TIG. 1, to a swept-back posi­ tion, FIG. 2, the spars 11 extend into the fuselage and into the inclined position shown during the approach, strcam, the tails 16 being hinged to the missile by so that the wheels are rotated by the passage of the pins 31 and separable therefrom as the result of the airstrcam through the turbines. When the desired pivotal movement of the noses. The front of each rotational speed is reached the wheels are moved rocket is secured to the body 10 by a lug 18 which back into their normal parallel position. The airflow engaged a spigot 19 through a screwed sleeve 22 through the wheels may be controlled by inlet guide within which is housed a plunger 23 and compression members on the undercarriage legs. spring 24. Each tail pipe 16 is encircled by a clamping ring 28 with arms 29 engaging the pin 31, which is 695,948. Centrifugal compressors. De Havilland carried by a collar segment 33, 34 or 35. Adjacent Engine Co. Ltd. Application, December 12, 1949. segments arc locked together by pins 38 which engage In order to reduce the outer diameter of a centri­ intcrfitting lugs 36, 37 on the respective segments, and fugal compressor, more particularly for a jet pro­ the complete collar is held on the body 10 by a weak pulsion unit, the gas discharged from the impeller rivet 40. Ignition of the rockets shears this rivet and J32 is directed into an annular receiving chamber C the rockets move forward against the springs 24, with curved walls C2, C3 which divert the gas through taking up a clearance x between the sleeves 21 and a right angle into an axially-extending annular dif- spigot ring 20. When the thrust of the rockets falls fuser fitted with a number of rows of short-chord below the force exerted by the springs 24, due to the blades D3, D4, D6, D", of a single row of blades with increasing thrust of the main motor, the springs dis­ engage sleeves 21 from spigots 19 and the forces on the vanes 17 cause the rockets to swing outwardly about the pivots 31. After a predetermined angular movement claws 32 at the ends of arms 29 engage the heads 39 of pins 38 which arc thus withdrawn from lugs 36, 37 to release the collar segments 33, 34, 35 and permit the rockets to fall away from the missile. 697,708. Supersonic wind tunnels. British Thomson- Houston Co. Ltd. Application, October 31, 1950. A two-dimensional wind tunnel with two throats 4, 8 is formed by two contour blocks 1, 2 to which arc attached in the region of the first throat two flexible wall members 11,12 which, under starting conditions are hinged together at 12, movement of the wings being effected by a hydraulic jack 14, 15 connected to links 13 whose ends are respectively connected to the spars and a fixed pivot 13'.Thc fore-and-aft movement of the wings consequent upon their angular adjust­ are, as shown, caused by rods 17, 18, 19, 20 to form ment ensures that the longitudinal trim of the machine a steadily diverging expansion section extending to a remains substantially constant. To prevent fouling of longer chords. To avoid or reduce turbulence in the point just downstream of the junction of the expan­ the leading edge root portions of the wings when the chamber C boundary layer control openings may be sion and working sections 5, 6 in the contour blocks. latter are spread, these portions arc formed as provided in the wall C2. After the shock wave 36 has been driven through the separate members 16 pivoted to the main wing second throat by increasing the pressure differential, sections at 17, their displacement being effected by the rods 17-20 are actuated to withdraw the walls links 18 whose rear ends are connected to fixed pivots 696,751. Jettisoning booster rockets. Faircy Avia­ 11, 12 so that they bear against the curved walls of 19 or, alternatively, against the action of springs 20 tion Co. Ltd. Application, January 25, 1949. the blocks 1, 2. By means of such an arrangement the when they engage fixed abutments 21. The wing loads Booster rockets 14 for a missile 10 are arranged to pressure differential required to move the shock wave are transmitted to the fuselage by vertical rods 23 be jettisoned in such a manner that their noses 15 are through the region of high Mach number is reduced secured to the fuselage, their upper and lower ends automatically separated from the missile after the to one only slightly greater than that required to engaging curved slots 22 in the wings, or by the re­ latter has been launched, inclined vanes 17 ensuring operate the tunnel after starting. verse arrangement in which vertical rods 37 are that they arc forced away from the missile by the air­ secured to the wings and engage slots 36 in the fuselage. 695,419. Prcrotating landing wheels. Compagnie Generate pour l'Equipcmcnt Aeronautique. Applica­ tion, June 26, 1950. To permit rotation of landing wheels 4, 8 prior to landing, axial-flow turbine blades are fitted between the wheel hubs and rims, the wheel axles 5 being swung forwards about vertical pivots 9 by jacks 7 in Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 26 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1954

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/month-in-the-patent-office-0mCwoUf99P

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032386
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

These abstracts of British Patent Specifications are condensed, by permission, from the official specifications. Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, price 2s. 8d. each. 695,025. Variable-sweep wings. Blackburn and General Aircraft Ltd. Application, June 23, 1950. Jn an aircraft in which the wings 10 can be moved from a spread position, TIG. 1, to a swept-back posi­ tion, FIG. 2, the spars 11 extend into the fuselage and into the inclined position shown during the approach, strcam, the tails 16 being hinged to the missile by so that the wheels are rotated by the passage of the pins 31 and separable therefrom as the result of the airstrcam through the turbines. When the desired pivotal movement of the noses. The front of each rotational speed is reached the wheels are moved rocket is secured to the body 10 by a lug 18 which back into their normal parallel position. The airflow engaged a spigot 19 through a screwed sleeve 22 through the wheels may be controlled by inlet guide within which is housed a plunger 23 and compression members on the undercarriage legs. spring 24. Each tail pipe 16 is encircled by a clamping ring 28 with arms 29 engaging the pin 31, which is 695,948. Centrifugal compressors. De Havilland carried by a collar segment 33, 34 or 35. Adjacent Engine Co. Ltd. Application, December 12, 1949. segments arc locked together by pins 38 which engage In order to reduce the outer diameter of a centri­ intcrfitting lugs 36, 37 on the respective segments, and fugal compressor, more particularly for a jet pro­ the complete collar is held on the body 10 by a weak pulsion unit, the gas discharged from the impeller rivet 40. Ignition of the rockets shears this rivet and J32 is directed into an annular receiving chamber C the rockets move forward against the springs 24, with curved walls C2, C3 which divert the gas through taking up a clearance x between the sleeves 21 and a right angle into an axially-extending annular dif- spigot ring 20. When the thrust of the rockets falls fuser fitted with a number of rows of short-chord below the force exerted by the springs 24, due to the blades D3, D4, D6, D", of a single row of blades with increasing thrust of the main motor, the springs dis­ engage sleeves 21 from spigots 19 and the forces on the vanes 17 cause the rockets to swing outwardly about the pivots 31. After a predetermined angular movement claws 32 at the ends of arms 29 engage the heads 39 of pins 38 which arc thus withdrawn from lugs 36, 37 to release the collar segments 33, 34, 35 and permit the rockets to fall away from the missile. 697,708. Supersonic wind tunnels. British Thomson- Houston Co. Ltd. Application, October 31, 1950. A two-dimensional wind tunnel with two throats 4, 8 is formed by two contour blocks 1, 2 to which arc attached in the region of the first throat two flexible wall members 11,12 which, under starting conditions are hinged together at 12, movement of the wings being effected by a hydraulic jack 14, 15 connected to links 13 whose ends are respectively connected to the spars and a fixed pivot 13'.Thc fore-and-aft movement of the wings consequent upon their angular adjust­ are, as shown, caused by rods 17, 18, 19, 20 to form ment ensures that the longitudinal trim of the machine a steadily diverging expansion section extending to a remains substantially constant. To prevent fouling of longer chords. To avoid or reduce turbulence in the point just downstream of the junction of the expan­ the leading edge root portions of the wings when the chamber C boundary layer control openings may be sion and working sections 5, 6 in the contour blocks. latter are spread, these portions arc formed as provided in the wall C2. After the shock wave 36 has been driven through the separate members 16 pivoted to the main wing second throat by increasing the pressure differential, sections at 17, their displacement being effected by the rods 17-20 are actuated to withdraw the walls links 18 whose rear ends are connected to fixed pivots 696,751. Jettisoning booster rockets. Faircy Avia­ 11, 12 so that they bear against the curved walls of 19 or, alternatively, against the action of springs 20 tion Co. Ltd. Application, January 25, 1949. the blocks 1, 2. By means of such an arrangement the when they engage fixed abutments 21. The wing loads Booster rockets 14 for a missile 10 are arranged to pressure differential required to move the shock wave are transmitted to the fuselage by vertical rods 23 be jettisoned in such a manner that their noses 15 are through the region of high Mach number is reduced secured to the fuselage, their upper and lower ends automatically separated from the missile after the to one only slightly greater than that required to engaging curved slots 22 in the wings, or by the re­ latter has been launched, inclined vanes 17 ensuring operate the tunnel after starting. verse arrangement in which vertical rods 37 are that they arc forced away from the missile by the air­ secured to the wings and engage slots 36 in the fuselage. 695,419. Prcrotating landing wheels. Compagnie Generate pour l'Equipcmcnt Aeronautique. Applica­ tion, June 26, 1950. To permit rotation of landing wheels 4, 8 prior to landing, axial-flow turbine blades are fitted between the wheel hubs and rims, the wheel axles 5 being swung forwards about vertical pivots 9 by jacks 7 in Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1954

There are no references for this article.