Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 26 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G January, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 402,951 . Aircraft for launching other air­ craft. Mayo, R. H., 39, St. James's Street, Pall Mall, London. Jan. 14, 1933, No. 1311. Drawings to Specification. [Class 4.] A composite aircraft comprising two component aircraft capable of separate flight mounted one on to p of another and initially connected together by releasable locking means so as to take off, fly and land as a single unit, has the wings of its upper component formed of a profile and aspect ratio of appreciably wider angular range between the angle of no lift and the angle of maximum lift than the corresponding angular range of the profile and aspect ratio employed for the wings of the lower speed. The fuel, for example petrol, passes a component. As the speed of the composite craft valve 23, Fig. 8, adjustable by a hand-actuated increases the proportion of the lift taken by the cam 24, and enters an annular chamber 20, from wings of the upper component increases and that of which it is distributed to the cylinders by valves 26, th e lower component diminishes until a speed is Fig . 7, and conduits 2. The valves 26 are opened reached at which a force is available for ensuring by a rotating cam 34, 36, the throw of which, and th e safe separation of the components when the therefore the opening of the valves, is varied by locking means are released, without the necessity adjustmen t of the part 34 by an axially movable of adjusting the lift coefficient of the wings of the cone 42 connected to a centrifugal governor 43. upper component. The Fokker F VII or Göttingen Th e governor spring 46 is adjustable by means of a 387 wing section may be employed on the upper cam 48 connected by linkwork 49, 50, 51, to a component and the R.A.F. 15 or R.A.F. 34, or diaphrag m 55, th e upper side of which is connected according to th e Provisional Specification R.A.F. 31, to the air-inlet manifold, and the lower side sub­ for the lower component. Alternatively the angular jected to atmospheric pressure at ground level. range of the wings of the upper component may I3y this means, the amount of fuel injected is controlled flight of the upper one immediately be increased by the use of fixed or adjustable regulated in accordance with the density of the air after such separation. Additional locking means slots, in which case the R.A.F. 15 or R.A.F. 31 charge, while the centrifugal governor maintains released only by the combined or consecutive wing section may be used, or the wings of the th e volume of fuel injected constant for any par­ operation of controls located in both machines may lower component may have initially depressed ticular air pressure, whatever may be the speed be provided, and the flying controls of the upper flaps which are raised automatically or mechani­ of the engine. The injection valve 10, Fig. 5, is machine may be locked until the machines are cally as the speed increases so as to reduce their opened by the fuel pressure, the fuel entering in the abou t to separate. The release may also be made angular range. The invention may be combined form of a fine conical spray which is further atom­ contingen t upon correct air speed. The axle 5, with the means for adjusting the lift coefficient ized by a deflector 14. Alternatively, the dia­ Fig. 3, and a rear shaft on the upper machine rest of the wings of the upper component described phrag m 55 ma y actuate the adjusting-cam 24, and in forwardly inclined forks on the lower machine in Specification 400,292 in which case the difference th e cam 48 be hand-controlled. Also the cam 24 and the machines are held together by one or more in the angular range may be less or the amount of ma y be connected to the throttle in the air inlet. tension members 7, Fig. 2, which can be tightened adjustment provided for may be diminished. The The petrol may be supplied by a pump fitted by turnbuckles 12. The membe r 7 engage s a hooked releasing means described in Specifications 400,292 with a pressure regulator, or by reservoir fed by a membe r 10 connected to a spring 14 so that the and 402,997 may be incorporated. pum p and placed under pressure by air from the machines are held together until excess lift is supply used for the starter, brakes, shock-absorbers, sufficient to turn the member 10 agains t the tension &c. of the spring 14 and allow the member 7 to slip off 402,997 . Aircraft for launching other air­ th e hook. The member 10 may be normally held craft. Mayo, R. H., 39, St. James's Street, Pall against movement by a catch 16 connected by a Mall, London. April 27, 1933, No . 12310. [Class 4.] cable 19 to a lever 22 movable by a cable 24 from A composite aircraft comprising two aeroplanes, th e cockpit of the upper machine, the lever 22 in each capable of separate flight mounted one on top tur n being normally prevented from moving by of the other and connected by releasable locking a detent 26 connected to a cable 27 leading to means to enable the composite aircraft to take off, th e cockpit of the other machine. A spring 29 fly and land as a single unit, has means for prevent­ actin g on the detent' passes the dead centre when ing release of the locking means until the wings of th e cable 27 is pulled and a slot 28 allows the cable the upper aeroplane have sufficient lift to ensure to fall clear. There may be three automatic release safe separation of th e two machines and independent devices, two laterally placed ones being released before the centre one. Alternatively the upper machine may be prevented from moving out of the forks on the lower machine by spring pressed balls or rollers 30, Fig. 3, which yield when a predeter­ mined lift is reached. There may also be positive locking pins across the forks releasable by the combined or consecutive operation of two controls in the respective machines. There may also be levers across the forks connected to the engine controls of the lower machine to ensure the shutting down of the engines of the lower machine or for actuatin g air brakes or lift spoiling devices thereon as the upper machine leaves the forks. The means for locking the flying controls may be operated by th e same means. [Abstracts of Major Mayo's previous specifications on this subject were published in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. VI, May, 1934, p. 148.—EDITOR.]. 410,139 . Supplying liquid fuel; regu­ lating . Bendix Aviation Corporation, 401, Bendix Drive, South Bend, Indiana, U.S.A. Nov. 11, 1932, No. 31921. Convention date, March 8. [Classes 7 (iii) and 7 (vi).] The amount of fuel per stroke injected from a source under constant pressure is controlled in accordance with the pressure in the air-inlet mani­ fold, but is otherwise made independent of engine http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 7 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1935

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029895
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Abstract

26 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G January, 1935 A Selection of the More Important Aircraft and Engin e Specifications Published Recently 402,951 . Aircraft for launching other air­ craft. Mayo, R. H., 39, St. James's Street, Pall Mall, London. Jan. 14, 1933, No. 1311. Drawings to Specification. [Class 4.] A composite aircraft comprising two component aircraft capable of separate flight mounted one on to p of another and initially connected together by releasable locking means so as to take off, fly and land as a single unit, has the wings of its upper component formed of a profile and aspect ratio of appreciably wider angular range between the angle of no lift and the angle of maximum lift than the corresponding angular range of the profile and aspect ratio employed for the wings of the lower speed. The fuel, for example petrol, passes a component. As the speed of the composite craft valve 23, Fig. 8, adjustable by a hand-actuated increases the proportion of the lift taken by the cam 24, and enters an annular chamber 20, from wings of the upper component increases and that of which it is distributed to the cylinders by valves 26, th e lower component diminishes until a speed is Fig . 7, and conduits 2. The valves 26 are opened reached at which a force is available for ensuring by a rotating cam 34, 36, the throw of which, and th e safe separation of the components when the therefore the opening of the valves, is varied by locking means are released, without the necessity adjustmen t of the part 34 by an axially movable of adjusting the lift coefficient of the wings of the cone 42 connected to a centrifugal governor 43. upper component. The Fokker F VII or Göttingen Th e governor spring 46 is adjustable by means of a 387 wing section may be employed on the upper cam 48 connected by linkwork 49, 50, 51, to a component and the R.A.F. 15 or R.A.F. 34, or diaphrag m 55, th e upper side of which is connected according to th e Provisional Specification R.A.F. 31, to the air-inlet manifold, and the lower side sub­ for the lower component. Alternatively the angular jected to atmospheric pressure at ground level. range of the wings of the upper component may I3y this means, the amount of fuel injected is controlled flight of the upper one immediately be increased by the use of fixed or adjustable regulated in accordance with the density of the air after such separation. Additional locking means slots, in which case the R.A.F. 15 or R.A.F. 31 charge, while the centrifugal governor maintains released only by the combined or consecutive wing section may be used, or the wings of the th e volume of fuel injected constant for any par­ operation of controls located in both machines may lower component may have initially depressed ticular air pressure, whatever may be the speed be provided, and the flying controls of the upper flaps which are raised automatically or mechani­ of the engine. The injection valve 10, Fig. 5, is machine may be locked until the machines are cally as the speed increases so as to reduce their opened by the fuel pressure, the fuel entering in the abou t to separate. The release may also be made angular range. The invention may be combined form of a fine conical spray which is further atom­ contingen t upon correct air speed. The axle 5, with the means for adjusting the lift coefficient ized by a deflector 14. Alternatively, the dia­ Fig. 3, and a rear shaft on the upper machine rest of the wings of the upper component described phrag m 55 ma y actuate the adjusting-cam 24, and in forwardly inclined forks on the lower machine in Specification 400,292 in which case the difference th e cam 48 be hand-controlled. Also the cam 24 and the machines are held together by one or more in the angular range may be less or the amount of ma y be connected to the throttle in the air inlet. tension members 7, Fig. 2, which can be tightened adjustment provided for may be diminished. The The petrol may be supplied by a pump fitted by turnbuckles 12. The membe r 7 engage s a hooked releasing means described in Specifications 400,292 with a pressure regulator, or by reservoir fed by a membe r 10 connected to a spring 14 so that the and 402,997 may be incorporated. pum p and placed under pressure by air from the machines are held together until excess lift is supply used for the starter, brakes, shock-absorbers, sufficient to turn the member 10 agains t the tension &c. of the spring 14 and allow the member 7 to slip off 402,997 . Aircraft for launching other air­ th e hook. The member 10 may be normally held craft. Mayo, R. H., 39, St. James's Street, Pall against movement by a catch 16 connected by a Mall, London. April 27, 1933, No . 12310. [Class 4.] cable 19 to a lever 22 movable by a cable 24 from A composite aircraft comprising two aeroplanes, th e cockpit of the upper machine, the lever 22 in each capable of separate flight mounted one on top tur n being normally prevented from moving by of the other and connected by releasable locking a detent 26 connected to a cable 27 leading to means to enable the composite aircraft to take off, th e cockpit of the other machine. A spring 29 fly and land as a single unit, has means for prevent­ actin g on the detent' passes the dead centre when ing release of the locking means until the wings of th e cable 27 is pulled and a slot 28 allows the cable the upper aeroplane have sufficient lift to ensure to fall clear. There may be three automatic release safe separation of th e two machines and independent devices, two laterally placed ones being released before the centre one. Alternatively the upper machine may be prevented from moving out of the forks on the lower machine by spring pressed balls or rollers 30, Fig. 3, which yield when a predeter­ mined lift is reached. There may also be positive locking pins across the forks releasable by the combined or consecutive operation of two controls in the respective machines. There may also be levers across the forks connected to the engine controls of the lower machine to ensure the shutting down of the engines of the lower machine or for actuatin g air brakes or lift spoiling devices thereon as the upper machine leaves the forks. The means for locking the flying controls may be operated by th e same means. [Abstracts of Major Mayo's previous specifications on this subject were published in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. VI, May, 1934, p. 148.—EDITOR.]. 410,139 . Supplying liquid fuel; regu­ lating . Bendix Aviation Corporation, 401, Bendix Drive, South Bend, Indiana, U.S.A. Nov. 11, 1932, No. 31921. Convention date, March 8. [Classes 7 (iii) and 7 (vi).] The amount of fuel per stroke injected from a source under constant pressure is controlled in accordance with the pressure in the air-inlet mani­ fold, but is otherwise made independent of engine

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1935

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