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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 160 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1930 A Selection from Important Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications Published Recently have a framework comprising front and rear No . 325,041. Aircraft spars.—Chorlton, han d to those marked L, L1, the bracings inter­ spars, a, b, each having top and bottom flanges A. E. L., 55, Lower Belgrave Street; Haig, secting one another at the ends of the spokes. R. A. de H., 5, Clarendon Street, and Stieger, Th e spokes H, I, J, H1, I1, J1 may be arranged g, interconnected by a plurality of cross-mem­ H. J., 76, Somerset Road, Wimbledon, all in in one plane in which case two sets of six bers e to form bays f and a system of diagonal London. Dec. 7, 1928, Nos. 36,131/28 and bracings are required. Figs 11 and 12 show an bracing members h capable of withstanding 18,692/29. [Classes 4 and 20 (iv).] application to a spar having booms P , Q, joined compressive and tensile stresses arranged in or near each of the planes of the spar flanges. b y a web R ; struts S of triangular form have Cars and cabins ; framework ; planes, con­ The webs c of the spars a, b, ma y be of plywood their bases constituted by the web R and have struction of.—A spar or shaft intended to resist and have vertical stiffening members d. The their apices arranged on the circumference of torsional stresses has spokes or struts which members e are similar in construction to the a circle having a diameter formed by the web radiate or extend outwardly and are connected R. The strut s S are so constructed and arranged spars. The members A are arranged two in the a t their ends by opposed systems of helical along the span tha t their apices follow a helical plane of each pair of opposed webs in each bay ; tension bracings wound around the spar or curve. The bracing of this spar is similar to alternatively, or in addition, members h may shaft. Examples of spars of this type applied tha t shown in Fig. 8. Fig. 15 shows an applica­ extend from the corner of one bay to the to aeroplane fuselages are shown in Figs. 2, 8, tion to a box spar ; in this case pairs of struts opposite corner of th e next bay. Alternatively 11, 12 and 15. In Fig. 2 a single boom A has th e spars and cross members may be of sheet, W, WX, extend outwardly at right angles to an d the diagonal members h of tubular metal. th e webs and have opposed systems of helical The flanges of th e spars and cross-members may tension bracings W1 . . W4 which extend flat be formed integrally by pressing them from across the sides of the spar ; the struts W, Wx ma y be in one piece passing right through the sheets of metal and the units thus formed con­ spar. In each case the ends of the radiating nected together by the webs. More than two spokes or struts are connected by longitudinal spars may be employed. When the ,wing is bracings F, or F , G if there are more than one. formed in three portions the centre section may be similar in construction to the outer wing Specification No. 306,220 is referred to. sections or may be constructed as a large box 325,465 . Aircraft Spars. Chorlton, A. E. spar or girder to enable passengers, luggage or L., 55, Lower Belgrave Street, Haig, R. A. De H . 5, Clarendon Street, and Stieger, H. J., 76, Somerset Road, Wimbledon, all in London. Dec. 7, 1928, No. 24904/29. Divided on 325,041. [Class 4.] Cars and cabins ; framework.—A longitudin­ ally disposed cantilever spar for fuselages or fuel to be accommodated. Hinges are des­ other elongated hollow bodies on aircraft, is cribed which are placed at the ends of the rear especially designed to take torsional stresses and comprises two booms A, B, held apart by a web C and triangular bracings E E1, F F1, G G1, and H H1, on opposite sides of the spar. The apices of these triangles are connected together in pairs, as shown, and the apices on opposite sides of the spar are stayed apart one from the other by struts D Dl, and are also stayed in line by wires J J1. The tension members may be wires as shown, or more rigid connections such as tubes may be used. Secon­ spars and are so inclined to the centre line of the dar y auxiliary spars and/or ribs may be spar section that the wings are clear of the arranged around the struts and spar, fabric or ground in the folded position. The centre other covering completing a streamline outline. section may pass above, below, or through the radially extending spokes or struts 13, B1, C, Specification 306,220 is referred to. fuselage. According to the Provisional Specifi­ C1, the spokes B, B l forming one series and cation the wings may be arranged to fold for­ the spokes C, C1, a second series disposed in a [The 'Monospar ' system of wing construction, wards in which case the hinges are placed at plane at right angles to the first. Tension to which these patents refer, was fully described th e ends of the front spars. bracings D, E are wound round the spar in in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. I., pp. 187-190 helical convolutions of opposite hand to tension —Editor.] bracings D1, E1. The spokes B, B1, C, C1, may be of different lengths so that the sections of Classified Advertisements the fuselage constructed on the spar may be elliptical. In another arrangement the spokes 2/- per Line, 2 Line Minimum, Payable in Advance. may be arranged in one plane in the form of a cross, four pairs of opposed tension bracings being used. In Fig. 8 a spar is shown having O ALL AERONAUTICAL FIRMS.— spokes H, I, J, H1, I1, J 1 arranged in angular T The specialised advertising and marketing steps about 60 deg. apart . In this case ther e are service required in the aviation field is six tension bracings marked K . . K3 and L, provided by AEROMARINE ADVER­ L1, the bracings K . . K3 are wound opposite TISING LTD., 56-57 Fleet Street, London, 326,349 . Aircraft. Henderson, W. S. and Henderson, B. B., (trading as Hendy Aircraft E.C.4 (Tele.: Central 2423). This service * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently Co.), and Miles, H. A., Shoreham Aerodrome, published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationer is free to clients. Leading aeronautical firms Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed Sussex. March 7, 1929, No. 7532. [Class 4.] copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent use this specialised organisation, which has Planes, arrangement and construction of.— Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling been built up by aviation experts. Write each. Aircraft wings or tail planes of the pure canti­ Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied or 'phone. lever or semi-cantilever types, or parts thereof, by drawings if none is reproduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 2 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1930

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029283
Publisher site
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Abstract

160 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING June, 1930 A Selection from Important Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications Published Recently have a framework comprising front and rear No . 325,041. Aircraft spars.—Chorlton, han d to those marked L, L1, the bracings inter­ spars, a, b, each having top and bottom flanges A. E. L., 55, Lower Belgrave Street; Haig, secting one another at the ends of the spokes. R. A. de H., 5, Clarendon Street, and Stieger, Th e spokes H, I, J, H1, I1, J1 may be arranged g, interconnected by a plurality of cross-mem­ H. J., 76, Somerset Road, Wimbledon, all in in one plane in which case two sets of six bers e to form bays f and a system of diagonal London. Dec. 7, 1928, Nos. 36,131/28 and bracings are required. Figs 11 and 12 show an bracing members h capable of withstanding 18,692/29. [Classes 4 and 20 (iv).] application to a spar having booms P , Q, joined compressive and tensile stresses arranged in or near each of the planes of the spar flanges. b y a web R ; struts S of triangular form have Cars and cabins ; framework ; planes, con­ The webs c of the spars a, b, ma y be of plywood their bases constituted by the web R and have struction of.—A spar or shaft intended to resist and have vertical stiffening members d. The their apices arranged on the circumference of torsional stresses has spokes or struts which members e are similar in construction to the a circle having a diameter formed by the web radiate or extend outwardly and are connected R. The strut s S are so constructed and arranged spars. The members A are arranged two in the a t their ends by opposed systems of helical along the span tha t their apices follow a helical plane of each pair of opposed webs in each bay ; tension bracings wound around the spar or curve. The bracing of this spar is similar to alternatively, or in addition, members h may shaft. Examples of spars of this type applied tha t shown in Fig. 8. Fig. 15 shows an applica­ extend from the corner of one bay to the to aeroplane fuselages are shown in Figs. 2, 8, tion to a box spar ; in this case pairs of struts opposite corner of th e next bay. Alternatively 11, 12 and 15. In Fig. 2 a single boom A has th e spars and cross members may be of sheet, W, WX, extend outwardly at right angles to an d the diagonal members h of tubular metal. th e webs and have opposed systems of helical The flanges of th e spars and cross-members may tension bracings W1 . . W4 which extend flat be formed integrally by pressing them from across the sides of the spar ; the struts W, Wx ma y be in one piece passing right through the sheets of metal and the units thus formed con­ spar. In each case the ends of the radiating nected together by the webs. More than two spokes or struts are connected by longitudinal spars may be employed. When the ,wing is bracings F, or F , G if there are more than one. formed in three portions the centre section may be similar in construction to the outer wing Specification No. 306,220 is referred to. sections or may be constructed as a large box 325,465 . Aircraft Spars. Chorlton, A. E. spar or girder to enable passengers, luggage or L., 55, Lower Belgrave Street, Haig, R. A. De H . 5, Clarendon Street, and Stieger, H. J., 76, Somerset Road, Wimbledon, all in London. Dec. 7, 1928, No. 24904/29. Divided on 325,041. [Class 4.] Cars and cabins ; framework.—A longitudin­ ally disposed cantilever spar for fuselages or fuel to be accommodated. Hinges are des­ other elongated hollow bodies on aircraft, is cribed which are placed at the ends of the rear especially designed to take torsional stresses and comprises two booms A, B, held apart by a web C and triangular bracings E E1, F F1, G G1, and H H1, on opposite sides of the spar. The apices of these triangles are connected together in pairs, as shown, and the apices on opposite sides of the spar are stayed apart one from the other by struts D Dl, and are also stayed in line by wires J J1. The tension members may be wires as shown, or more rigid connections such as tubes may be used. Secon­ spars and are so inclined to the centre line of the dar y auxiliary spars and/or ribs may be spar section that the wings are clear of the arranged around the struts and spar, fabric or ground in the folded position. The centre other covering completing a streamline outline. section may pass above, below, or through the radially extending spokes or struts 13, B1, C, Specification 306,220 is referred to. fuselage. According to the Provisional Specifi­ C1, the spokes B, B l forming one series and cation the wings may be arranged to fold for­ the spokes C, C1, a second series disposed in a [The 'Monospar ' system of wing construction, wards in which case the hinges are placed at plane at right angles to the first. Tension to which these patents refer, was fully described th e ends of the front spars. bracings D, E are wound round the spar in in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Vol. I., pp. 187-190 helical convolutions of opposite hand to tension —Editor.] bracings D1, E1. The spokes B, B1, C, C1, may be of different lengths so that the sections of Classified Advertisements the fuselage constructed on the spar may be elliptical. In another arrangement the spokes 2/- per Line, 2 Line Minimum, Payable in Advance. may be arranged in one plane in the form of a cross, four pairs of opposed tension bracings being used. In Fig. 8 a spar is shown having O ALL AERONAUTICAL FIRMS.— spokes H, I, J, H1, I1, J 1 arranged in angular T The specialised advertising and marketing steps about 60 deg. apart . In this case ther e are service required in the aviation field is six tension bracings marked K . . K3 and L, provided by AEROMARINE ADVER­ L1, the bracings K . . K3 are wound opposite TISING LTD., 56-57 Fleet Street, London, 326,349 . Aircraft. Henderson, W. S. and Henderson, B. B., (trading as Hendy Aircraft E.C.4 (Tele.: Central 2423). This service * These abstracts of complete specifications of Patents recently Co.), and Miles, H. A., Shoreham Aerodrome, published are specially compiled by permission of H.M. Stationer is free to clients. Leading aeronautical firms Office, from abridgements appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed Sussex. March 7, 1929, No. 7532. [Class 4.] copies of the full specifications can be obtained from the Patent use this specialised organisation, which has Planes, arrangement and construction of.— Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling been built up by aviation experts. Write each. Aircraft wings or tail planes of the pure canti­ Except where otherwise stated, the specification is unaccompanied or 'phone. lever or semi-cantilever types, or parts thereof, by drawings if none is reproduced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1930

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