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Month in the Patent Office

Month in the Patent Office 50 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING February, 1930 A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications No . 317,841. Aeroplanes. Soc. Anon. des Ateliers d'Aviation L. Bréguet, 115, Rue de la Pompe, Paris. March 19, 1929, No. 8932. Convention date, Aug. 24, 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. Controlling.—An aeroplane is provided with one or more narrow planes, above the main plane, which can be maintained automatically or by the pilot at a lesser angle of incidence tha n the main planes as th e latter approach the stalling angle. In some cases provision is made for differential movement of the narrow planes for lateral balancing. Fig. 3 shows one form in which a central ment of tracks is such that the trailing edge connected at their ends by links 17, 18. The narrow plane P is maintained at a normal is arranged to be lowered more than the link 17 is pivotally mounted at 19 in th e casing 3, angle of attack by tail planes E, El, and leading edge. Transverse ribs and compression and the link 18 is engaged by a fork 20 extending two side sections Pg, Pd are maintained at ribs are provided, the latter preferably forming rigidly from the handle 1. The toggles normally the required angle by springs rg, rd which th e housings for the tracks and some of the lie in a partly collapsed position, and are operating means therefor. A deflector 24 prevented from moving outwards by set extends beyond the upper face of the leading screws 22. When the handle 1 is pulled in section 23 and an extension 25 of the lower th e direction of the arrow acceleration of the face prevents air entering between the entering aircraft takes place in a vertical direction and and central section. The trailing edge section the weight 6 moves downwards. When the 31 ma y be moved b y means comprising a sliding acceleration reaches a predetermined amount shaft, crank arm, link, and horn. A universal th e rollers 11, 12 slip over the cone 9 and joint is provided and a slotted coupling is cause the collapse of the toggles 15, 16, The connected by an arm with an operating rod. handle 1 will then jerk rearward giving an Auxiliary ailerons are provided preferably indication to the pilot that he has reached supported by a pair of struts in positions cither th e maximum allowable acceleration. Upon vertically above or below the main airfoil, the moving the handle 1 forward again, the lateral stability being increased thereby during accelerometer weight rises in the control a high angle of attack. Preferably each aileron column tube and re-sets the toggles. Instead are subject to a differential control by the is pivoted to the struts at a point slightly in of the moving weight operating toggles it pilot for effecting the lateral balance of the advance of the centre of pressure thereon. ma y operate by making and breaking electric machine. Alternatively, tail planes may be contacts, or by actuating pneumatic valves provided on the sections Pg, Pd, or the No . 322,293 . Accelerometer for Aircraft. for controlling the signal device. central section P may be omitted. The springs Wimperis, H. E., Air Ministry, Kingsway, rg, rd couple the outer ends of links 3g, 3d to London. Oct. 22, 1928, No. 30,515. cams on a lever C pivoted in a fork tha t can be An accelerometer for use on aircraft has tilted laterally about an axis Xm, X1m by a means for giving to the pilot a tactile, visual lever M11 thereb y displacing the planes Pg, Pd or aural signal when a predetermined ac­ in opposite directions without interfering with celeratio n is th e automatic control of their incidence. A reached. A con­ machine also is described in which a narrow trol column has a forwardly staggered plane is placed above the handle 1 pivoted main plane and a t large incidences of the main a t 2 in a casing 3, plane is adjusted to smaller relative incidences. which is fast in th e upper end of No . 319,983 . Aeroplanes. Burnelli, V. J., a control column 247, Park Avenue, New York, and Wilford, tub e 4, inside K. B., 300, Linden Avenue, Merion, Pennsyl­ which a cylindri­ vania, both in U.S.A. Nov. 14, 1928, No. cal accelerometer weight 6, sup­ Planes and the like, construction of; steering, ported by a helical balancing, and regulating altitude of.—An aerofoil spring 7, is slid- is made with a central section 11, Fig. 2, abl y mounted. supporting telescopic end sections 22, 31, The upper end of which are capable of movement on arcuate the accelerometer tracks 15. Spars 23, 32, on the respective weight is designed sections are attached to arms 28, 281 formed in the form of two with racks 29, 29 l engaged by sprocket wheels 18 truncate d cones 8, driven from a sprocket wheel 20. The arrange­ 9, surmounted by a thin stem 10. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Bearing against Patents recently published are specially compiled th e cones are two by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from diametricall y abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed copies of the full specifications can be opposite rollers obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton 11, 12, mounted Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. in sliders 13, 14, Except where otherwise stated, the specification which are engaged is unaccompanied by drawings if none is repro­ by toggles 15, 16, duced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Month in the Patent Office

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 2 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1930

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029240
Publisher site
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Abstract

50 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING February, 1930 A Selection from Important Recently Published Aircraft and Aero Engine Specifications No . 317,841. Aeroplanes. Soc. Anon. des Ateliers d'Aviation L. Bréguet, 115, Rue de la Pompe, Paris. March 19, 1929, No. 8932. Convention date, Aug. 24, 1928. Not yet accepted. Abridged as open to inspection under Sect. 91 of the Acts. Controlling.—An aeroplane is provided with one or more narrow planes, above the main plane, which can be maintained automatically or by the pilot at a lesser angle of incidence tha n the main planes as th e latter approach the stalling angle. In some cases provision is made for differential movement of the narrow planes for lateral balancing. Fig. 3 shows one form in which a central ment of tracks is such that the trailing edge connected at their ends by links 17, 18. The narrow plane P is maintained at a normal is arranged to be lowered more than the link 17 is pivotally mounted at 19 in th e casing 3, angle of attack by tail planes E, El, and leading edge. Transverse ribs and compression and the link 18 is engaged by a fork 20 extending two side sections Pg, Pd are maintained at ribs are provided, the latter preferably forming rigidly from the handle 1. The toggles normally the required angle by springs rg, rd which th e housings for the tracks and some of the lie in a partly collapsed position, and are operating means therefor. A deflector 24 prevented from moving outwards by set extends beyond the upper face of the leading screws 22. When the handle 1 is pulled in section 23 and an extension 25 of the lower th e direction of the arrow acceleration of the face prevents air entering between the entering aircraft takes place in a vertical direction and and central section. The trailing edge section the weight 6 moves downwards. When the 31 ma y be moved b y means comprising a sliding acceleration reaches a predetermined amount shaft, crank arm, link, and horn. A universal th e rollers 11, 12 slip over the cone 9 and joint is provided and a slotted coupling is cause the collapse of the toggles 15, 16, The connected by an arm with an operating rod. handle 1 will then jerk rearward giving an Auxiliary ailerons are provided preferably indication to the pilot that he has reached supported by a pair of struts in positions cither th e maximum allowable acceleration. Upon vertically above or below the main airfoil, the moving the handle 1 forward again, the lateral stability being increased thereby during accelerometer weight rises in the control a high angle of attack. Preferably each aileron column tube and re-sets the toggles. Instead are subject to a differential control by the is pivoted to the struts at a point slightly in of the moving weight operating toggles it pilot for effecting the lateral balance of the advance of the centre of pressure thereon. ma y operate by making and breaking electric machine. Alternatively, tail planes may be contacts, or by actuating pneumatic valves provided on the sections Pg, Pd, or the No . 322,293 . Accelerometer for Aircraft. for controlling the signal device. central section P may be omitted. The springs Wimperis, H. E., Air Ministry, Kingsway, rg, rd couple the outer ends of links 3g, 3d to London. Oct. 22, 1928, No. 30,515. cams on a lever C pivoted in a fork tha t can be An accelerometer for use on aircraft has tilted laterally about an axis Xm, X1m by a means for giving to the pilot a tactile, visual lever M11 thereb y displacing the planes Pg, Pd or aural signal when a predetermined ac­ in opposite directions without interfering with celeratio n is th e automatic control of their incidence. A reached. A con­ machine also is described in which a narrow trol column has a forwardly staggered plane is placed above the handle 1 pivoted main plane and a t large incidences of the main a t 2 in a casing 3, plane is adjusted to smaller relative incidences. which is fast in th e upper end of No . 319,983 . Aeroplanes. Burnelli, V. J., a control column 247, Park Avenue, New York, and Wilford, tub e 4, inside K. B., 300, Linden Avenue, Merion, Pennsyl­ which a cylindri­ vania, both in U.S.A. Nov. 14, 1928, No. cal accelerometer weight 6, sup­ Planes and the like, construction of; steering, ported by a helical balancing, and regulating altitude of.—An aerofoil spring 7, is slid- is made with a central section 11, Fig. 2, abl y mounted. supporting telescopic end sections 22, 31, The upper end of which are capable of movement on arcuate the accelerometer tracks 15. Spars 23, 32, on the respective weight is designed sections are attached to arms 28, 281 formed in the form of two with racks 29, 29 l engaged by sprocket wheels 18 truncate d cones 8, driven from a sprocket wheel 20. The arrange­ 9, surmounted by a thin stem 10. * These abstracts of complete specifications of Bearing against Patents recently published are specially compiled th e cones are two by permission of H.M. Stationery Office, from diametricall y abridgments appearing in the Patent Journal. Printed copies of the full specifications can be opposite rollers obtained from the Patent Office, 25, Southampton 11, 12, mounted Buildings, London, W.2, price one shilling each. in sliders 13, 14, Except where otherwise stated, the specification which are engaged is unaccompanied by drawings if none is repro­ by toggles 15, 16, duced.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1930

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